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Comment Re:Digital Rights? (Score 1) 63

And normal Joe's call it "bullshit that pisses ya off and sends you straight to TPB" ala the classic oatmeal strip.

AAMOF the ONLY DRM I've seen that doesn't piss people off and actually gets shit right? Steam. It has offline mode so you can still play your games if your connection goes tits up, and the platform actually does things FOR the consumer instead of simply being a tool for big corps to use against the user. It keeps all your games updated, gives creators of games an easy way to support modders and an easy way for players to use mods with Steam workshop, gives you chat,hassle free matchmaking, its convenient as hell which is what the media companies never seem to grasp, people want CONVENIENCE.

But instead the big corps will shit all over it in their endless greed and fuck it up, they always do. Hell we have a perfect example with MSFT and PlaysForSure. They had a great ecosystem with tons of shops you could buy and rent from, devices at every price point from sub $10 to over $400 that worked with it, both major and minor players supporting it....then MSFT got fucking greedy and killed it for their shitty iPod clone and in less than 2 years completely wiped out every inch they had gained in the market and had nothing to show for it besides a warehouse full of shit brown Zunes.

So don't worry fellow geeks, they will shit all over this thing as they always do. they will have the content split among a dozen different places, half of which won't play nice with the other half and ALL charging too much, it won't work worth a piss with any mobile that is older than 5 minutes ago, and it'll go the way of SecuROM and RMA files because if its one thing we've seen is true of big media? Its owned by a bunch of old farts that have ZERO clue what the consumers want.

Comment Re:I use them quite a lot (Score 1) 204

I think there's a lot of truth here. We see it in so many other stupid UI fads too, especially the whole flat-UI trend that's been going on for 4-5 years now I think. These designers are all part of a big cargo cult, not experts putting real thought and feedback data into their design decisions.

Comment Re:Two Solutions (Score 1) 233

So what kind of software and usage did your code have?

For comparison, we have 10,000 seats. Multiprocessor license. My code typically clocks 3 CPU months per year per user. The minimum config machine for our software is 16 processors, 64 GB memory, typical installation is 32 processor and 128 GB. Going with 5000 users average over 20 year span, I estimate my code has clocked around 300,000 x 30 x 86,400 cpu seconds. 860 billion cpu seconds almost. Which means our FE solver has clocked 4 trillion cpu seconds!

As of today I have 1 high priority and 58 total known defects.

Comment Re:How wiretaps actually work... (Score 1) 519

... and I get a cookie for calling it.

I said: "Assuming that Mr. Trump had contacted Russians or those suspected of being Russians then his network would already be flagged as interesting and you'd already have transcripts."

and today...

Politico: "House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes declared Wednesday that members of Donald Trumpâ(TM)s transition team, possibly including Trump himself, were under inadvertent surveillance following Novemberâ(TM)s presidential election."

Comment Re:Tractor Breakers, not Fixers. (Score 1) 445

When you say "void the warranty", that implies that the mfgr is able to refuse ALL warranty claims, and that the product is no longer covered by any warranty. This is flatly illegal.

What mfgrs *can* do is refuse to honor the warranty for specific claims when they can prove that the customer caused the problem in the first place, such as with a shoddy repair or faulty part.

So if you change your own oil and strip out the drain bolt and the oil all leaks out and your engine seizes, the mfgr does not have to repair your engine. But if you change your own wiper blades with Anco blades from Walmart, they are not allowed to refuse to fix your car when the engine fails, because the wiper blades have nothing to do with the engine. If you change your own oil and the brakes fail, again they cannot refuse to fix it. If you change your own brake pads and the brakes fail, they still cannot refuse to fix it unless they can reasonably prove that you did something wrong or used a bad part. General maintenance/consumable things like oil/filters, brake pads have lots of aftermarket support so it's not easy to prove that the Fram/Purolator/Bosch filter caused your engine problem.

Comment Re:Huh? I use these all the time. (Score 1) 204

This gets down to something that used to be a common UI design principle before software became so feature-ful it became impractical: manifest interface.

The idea of a manifest interface (which also is a principle in language and API design) is that if the software has a capability you should be able to see it. You shouldn't have to root around to stumble upon it. Tabs follow this principle; there's enough visual and behavioral cues to suggest that you need to click on a tab. The little "x" in the tab also follows this principle.

But context menus you access by right-clicking break this rule, which means that there may be millions of people laboriously clicking on "x" after "x", unaware that they can make all the extraneous tabs in their browser disappear with just two clicks.

This, by the way, is why Macintoshes were designed with one button on the mouse. But even Mac UI designers couldn't get by with just single and double-click, so you have option-click too, bit by in large you could operate most programs without it.

Anyhow, to make sure people know about this kind of feature, your program is going to have to watch their behavior and suggest they try right clicking. But that way lies Clippy...

Comment Re:I've noticed that, but something else interesti (Score 1) 154

Those aren't errors in the GPS, but the data it's working with.

I'm curious what you'd rank as an 'error in the GPS'. I completely glossed over other classes of 'error'; such as the GPS guessing which way you are facing on a road when you start a trip so you drive six feet and then it recalculates a new route based on the fact that you are going the other direction but that's just 'bad data too'. Or then there are the times its positional reckoning is off -- so it tells you to turn but you are actually a block away from where it thinks you are but that's just 'bad data' too.

Are those errors in the GPS, Or in the data its working from...it seems to be a distiction without a difference to me.

We validate what the GPS is telling us to do, but we don't ignore it's instructions and plan our own path. If one can't turn left, they pass the turn and wait for the GPS to figure things out.

As often as not, it simply reroutes you around the block back to the same intersection you couldn't use the first time. If you are lucky it'll at least have you approach it from a new angle so you can legally turn... i've been unlucky on many occasions. And if the road is simply closed for construction or something you are boned when it does that.

If you can't get in the correct lane in time, again, no panic, just keep driving until the GPS recalculates.

Yeah, that's usually where the GPS starts insisting you make illegal U-turns at major intersections, or emergency vehicle access roads, etc...

Comment Re:Use Mahindra & Mahindra (Score 1) 445

but it all catches up with everyone eventually.

Not necessarily. This board is likely full of people who are fairly well-off, have valuable tech skills that are highly transferable, and have the ability to leave a sinking ship for other nations if need be. Rural farmers don't have that so much, and can't just pack up and skip the country if things go south in a bad way. The rural voters have really screwed themselves.

Comment Re:With cellular plans starting... (Score 1) 122

With american cellular plans starting to offer reasonable amounts of "unlimited*" data, it's getting easier to actually cut the cord.

Well, that's just fine when you're out and about or traveling and want to watch stuff....

But when I'm at home, I want full quality and no limits....

I didn't buy 55" OLED 4K tv's to just watch them at low rez, and have to worry about data caps/slowdowns hitting...

I suppose if you watch your media on nothing ever bigger than a 8" screen, then this would work, but for many that made a reasonable living and have nice TVs at home, you need a larger, more dependable pipe...

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