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Submission + - Teachers can use this to see who's learning (sciencedaily.com)

wisebabo writes: Until now, researchers had not had a good way to study how people actually experienced what is called "epiphany learning."

In new research, scientists at The Ohio State University used eye-tracking and pupil dilation technology to see what happens as people figured out how to win a strategy game on a computer.

"We could see our study participants figuring out the solution through their eye movements as they considered their options," said Ian Krajbich, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology and economics at Ohio State.

"We could predict they were about to have an epiphany before they even knew it was coming."

This might be useful to determine when you are trying to teach a difficult subject to someone who you're afraid might be inclined to just nod their head. Or maybe this is how the Voight-Kampff test works. (Are you a replicant?) http://www.bfi.org.uk/are-you-...

Submission + - SPAM: Bosch And University Of Amsterdam Launch Joint AI Lab

An anonymous reader writes: German engineering giant Bosch has partnered with researchers at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) to develop deep learning technologies for application in intelligent cameras, self-driving cars, homecare and beyond. The joint initiative will see teams from the university’s Delta Lab (Deep Learning Technologies Amsterdam) and the Bosch Center for Artificial Intelligence design models and algorithms specifically for the processing of huge amounts of data collected from sensors and vehicles. Based at the Amsterdam Science Park, the collaborative project aims to promote stronger knowledge sharing between the academic and business worlds to help accelerate innovation around AI and deep learning analytics.

Submission + - Destructive KillDisk Malware Turns Into Ransomware (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: A recently discovered variant of the KillDisk malware encrypts files and holds them for ransom instead of deleting them. Since KillDisk has been used in attacks aimed at industrial control systems (ICS), experts are concerned that threat actors may be bringing ransomware into the industrial domain.

CyberX VP of research David Atch told SecurityWeek that the KillDisk variant they have analyzed is a well-written piece of ransomware, and victims are instructed to pay 222 bitcoins ($210,000) to recover their files, which experts believe suggests that the attackers are targeting “organizations with deep pockets.”

Submission + - Cisco: Zeus spawn "Floki bot" malware gaining use, cyber-underworld notorieity (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: “[Floki bot] is based on the same codebase that was used by the infamous Zeus trojan, the source code of which was leaked in 2011. Rather than simply copying the features that were present within the Zeus trojan ‘as-is’, Floki Bot claims to feature several new capabilities making it an attractive tool for criminals,” Talos wrote.

Submission + - Industrial IoT Market worth 151.01 Billion USD by 2020 (marketsandmarkets.com)

Mauli246 writes: According to the new market research report "Industrial IoT Market by Technology (Sensors, RFID, Industrial Robotics, 3D Printing, DCS, Condition Monitoring, Smart Meter, Autonomous Haulage System, Yield Monitors, Guidance & Steering, GPS/GNSS), Software, & Geography — Global Forecast to 2020", the IIoT market is expected to reach USD 151.01 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of 8.03% between 2015 and 2020

Submission + - Terabit-Scale DDoS Events Are On The Horizon (helpnetsecurity.com)

Orome1 writes: Corero Network Security has disclosed a new DDoS attack vector observed for the first time against its customers last week. The technique is an amplification attack, which utilizes the LDAP: one of the most widely used protocols for accessing username and password information in databases like Active Directory, which is integrated in most online servers. While experts have so far only observed a handful of short but extremely powerful attacks originating from this vector, the technique has potential to inflict significant damage by leveraging an amplification factor seen at a peak of as much as 55x. When combined with other methods, particularly IoT botnets, we could soon see attacks reaching previously unimaginable scale, with far-reaching impact. Terabit scale attacks could soon become a common reality and could significantly impact the availability of the Internet.

Submission + - Deep Space Network glitches worry scientists (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Earlier this year, the Cassini spacecraft screwed up an orbital maneuver at Saturn because of a problem with its radio connection to Earth. The incident was one of several recent glitches in the Deep Space Network (DSN), NASA’s complex of large radio antennas in California, Spain, and Australia. For more than 50 years, the DSN has been the lifeline for nearly every spacecraft beyond Earth’s orbit, relaying commands from mission control and receiving data from the distant probe. On 30 September, in a meeting at NASA headquarters, officials will brief planetary scientists on the network’s status. Many are worried, based on anecdotal reports, that budget cuts and age have taken a toll that could endanger the complex maneuvers that Cassini and Juno, a spacecraft now at Jupiter, will require over the next year.

Submission + - SPAM: Biometric Skimmers: Future Threats To ATMs

SecurityNews writes: Kaspersky Lab experts investigated how cybercriminals could exploit new biometric ATM authentication technologies planned by banks. While many financial organizations consider biometric-based solutions to be one of the most promising additions to current authentication methods, cybercriminals see biometrics as a new opportunity to steal sensitive information. The investigation into underground cybercrime concluded there are already at least 12 sellers offering skimmers capable of stealing victims’ fingerprints. In addition, at least three underground sellers are already researching devices that could illegally obtain data from palm vein and iris recognition systems.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - EU court: Linking without permission violates copyright

BarbaraHudson writes: From the "look-but-don't-link dept

Reuters is reporting that Playboy has won a lawsuit against a Netherlands news site for linking to photos without permission.



"It is undisputed that GS Media (which owns GreenStijl)provided the hyperlinks to the files containing the photos for profit and that Sanoma had not authorised the publication of those photos on the internet," the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) said in a statement.

"When hyperlinks are posted for profit, it may be expected that the person who posted such a link should carry out the checks necessary to ensure that the work concerned is not illegally published.

The European Commission, the EU executive, is set next week to propose tougher rules on publishing copyrighted content, including a new exclusive right for news publishers to ask search engines like Google to pay to show snippets of their articles.

Submission + - How To Use Print Screen On A Mac OS X Computer (usefulpcguide.com)

tonytranupc writes: It's very easy to take a screenshot on a Mac (use Print Screen Mac function) for users who have been using Mac OS X for years — nothing strange with the features and functions of Mac OS X. But if you have recently switched from Microsoft's Windows or Linux to Mac OS X, you might feel unfamiliar with this new platform and don't really know how to use its features.

Submission + - SPAM: NASA and space policy are missing from the 2016 Democratic Party platform

MarkWhittington writes: As the Democratic Party continues to craft its platform, NASA Watch’s Keith Cowing noticed a conspicuous omission. Apparently, no mention exists about NASA or civilian space policy. Cowing puts this down to the idea that space is a “niche issue.” On the other hand, sections exist supporting statehood for Washington D.C. and closing Guantanamo, two matters that have not been in the news as of late.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - AMD lands 3 large semi-custom SoC orders, expects revenue of $1.5 Billion over n (arstechnica.com)

John Smith writes: AMD announced an expected 15% income gain in Q2 2016 (and even larger ones in Q3 2016) mostly driven by three semi-custom SoC orders. They expect these three to bring in $1.5 billion in revenue over the next 3-4 years.
We know one of them is the new PlayStation from various leaks, but what are the other two? General suspicion seems to be the Nintendo NX and a Xbox refresh. This would among other things suggest that Nintento is going for an SoC design over their previous PowerPC/AMD chips, and that an Xbox refresh is coming soon.
However, whatever these turn out to be we are going to be seeing them soon. According to Ars Technica, "At least one of those three SOC deliveries will begin "ramping" in the second half of this year, with all of those SOCs launching by 2017."

Submission + - Senior Homeland Security official says Internet anonymity should be outlawed (dailydot.com) 1

Patrick O'Neill writes: A senior Homeland Security official recently argued that Internet anonymity should outlawed in the same way that driving a car without a license plate is against the law.

“When a person drives a car on a highway, he or she agrees to display a license plate,” Erik Barnett, an assistant deputy director at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and attache to the European Union at the Department of Homeland Security, wrote. “The license plate’s identifiers are ignored most of the time by law enforcement. Law enforcement will use the identifiers, though, to determine the driver’s identity if the car is involved in a legal infraction or otherwise becomes a matter of public interest. Similarly, should not every individual be required to display a ‘license plate’ on the digital super-highway?”


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