Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Industrial IoT Market worth 151.01 Billion USD by 2020 (marketsandmarkets.com)

Mauli246 writes: According to the new market research report "Industrial IoT Market by Technology (Sensors, RFID, Industrial Robotics, 3D Printing, DCS, Condition Monitoring, Smart Meter, Autonomous Haulage System, Yield Monitors, Guidance & Steering, GPS/GNSS), Software, & Geography — Global Forecast to 2020", the IIoT market is expected to reach USD 151.01 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR of 8.03% between 2015 and 2020

Submission + - Terabit-Scale DDoS Events Are On The Horizon (helpnetsecurity.com)

Orome1 writes: Corero Network Security has disclosed a new DDoS attack vector observed for the first time against its customers last week. The technique is an amplification attack, which utilizes the LDAP: one of the most widely used protocols for accessing username and password information in databases like Active Directory, which is integrated in most online servers. While experts have so far only observed a handful of short but extremely powerful attacks originating from this vector, the technique has potential to inflict significant damage by leveraging an amplification factor seen at a peak of as much as 55x. When combined with other methods, particularly IoT botnets, we could soon see attacks reaching previously unimaginable scale, with far-reaching impact. Terabit scale attacks could soon become a common reality and could significantly impact the availability of the Internet.

Submission + - Deep Space Network glitches worry scientists (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Earlier this year, the Cassini spacecraft screwed up an orbital maneuver at Saturn because of a problem with its radio connection to Earth. The incident was one of several recent glitches in the Deep Space Network (DSN), NASA’s complex of large radio antennas in California, Spain, and Australia. For more than 50 years, the DSN has been the lifeline for nearly every spacecraft beyond Earth’s orbit, relaying commands from mission control and receiving data from the distant probe. On 30 September, in a meeting at NASA headquarters, officials will brief planetary scientists on the network’s status. Many are worried, based on anecdotal reports, that budget cuts and age have taken a toll that could endanger the complex maneuvers that Cassini and Juno, a spacecraft now at Jupiter, will require over the next year.

Submission + - SPAM: Biometric Skimmers: Future Threats To ATMs

SecurityNews writes: Kaspersky Lab experts investigated how cybercriminals could exploit new biometric ATM authentication technologies planned by banks. While many financial organizations consider biometric-based solutions to be one of the most promising additions to current authentication methods, cybercriminals see biometrics as a new opportunity to steal sensitive information. The investigation into underground cybercrime concluded there are already at least 12 sellers offering skimmers capable of stealing victims’ fingerprints. In addition, at least three underground sellers are already researching devices that could illegally obtain data from palm vein and iris recognition systems.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - EU court: Linking without permission violates copyright

BarbaraHudson writes: From the "look-but-don't-link dept

Reuters is reporting that Playboy has won a lawsuit against a Netherlands news site for linking to photos without permission.



"It is undisputed that GS Media (which owns GreenStijl)provided the hyperlinks to the files containing the photos for profit and that Sanoma had not authorised the publication of those photos on the internet," the Luxembourg-based Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) said in a statement.

"When hyperlinks are posted for profit, it may be expected that the person who posted such a link should carry out the checks necessary to ensure that the work concerned is not illegally published.

The European Commission, the EU executive, is set next week to propose tougher rules on publishing copyrighted content, including a new exclusive right for news publishers to ask search engines like Google to pay to show snippets of their articles.

Submission + - How To Use Print Screen On A Mac OS X Computer (usefulpcguide.com)

tonytranupc writes: It's very easy to take a screenshot on a Mac (use Print Screen Mac function) for users who have been using Mac OS X for years — nothing strange with the features and functions of Mac OS X. But if you have recently switched from Microsoft's Windows or Linux to Mac OS X, you might feel unfamiliar with this new platform and don't really know how to use its features.

Submission + - SPAM: NASA and space policy are missing from the 2016 Democratic Party platform

MarkWhittington writes: As the Democratic Party continues to craft its platform, NASA Watch’s Keith Cowing noticed a conspicuous omission. Apparently, no mention exists about NASA or civilian space policy. Cowing puts this down to the idea that space is a “niche issue.” On the other hand, sections exist supporting statehood for Washington D.C. and closing Guantanamo, two matters that have not been in the news as of late.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - AMD lands 3 large semi-custom SoC orders, expects revenue of $1.5 Billion over n (arstechnica.com)

John Smith writes: AMD announced an expected 15% income gain in Q2 2016 (and even larger ones in Q3 2016) mostly driven by three semi-custom SoC orders. They expect these three to bring in $1.5 billion in revenue over the next 3-4 years.
We know one of them is the new PlayStation from various leaks, but what are the other two? General suspicion seems to be the Nintendo NX and a Xbox refresh. This would among other things suggest that Nintento is going for an SoC design over their previous PowerPC/AMD chips, and that an Xbox refresh is coming soon.
However, whatever these turn out to be we are going to be seeing them soon. According to Ars Technica, "At least one of those three SOC deliveries will begin "ramping" in the second half of this year, with all of those SOCs launching by 2017."

Submission + - Senior Homeland Security official says Internet anonymity should be outlawed (dailydot.com) 1

Patrick O'Neill writes: A senior Homeland Security official recently argued that Internet anonymity should outlawed in the same way that driving a car without a license plate is against the law.

“When a person drives a car on a highway, he or she agrees to display a license plate,” Erik Barnett, an assistant deputy director at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and attache to the European Union at the Department of Homeland Security, wrote. “The license plate’s identifiers are ignored most of the time by law enforcement. Law enforcement will use the identifiers, though, to determine the driver’s identity if the car is involved in a legal infraction or otherwise becomes a matter of public interest. Similarly, should not every individual be required to display a ‘license plate’ on the digital super-highway?”


Submission + - Introductory SW Engineering Projects (HS level)

mtapman writes: List three suggested introductory software engineering projects for a high school level student. Assume the student can do basic math (up through Algebra I or Statistics I) but is new to logic and computer science. Each project should take no more than four hours to complete including research, coding, and testing.The intent is to introduce the student to software engineering (and computer science) through practical and fun examples. Classic CS problems are welcome. One of the key criteria is available research/reference material to allow the student to make progress with 30-60 minutes of online research.

Some ideas that came to my mind (not necessarily good ones) are: (1) pick a sorting algorithm and sort a list of ten words alphabetically, (2) write a program to convert characters from lower to upper case, (3) write a program to divide two numbers in two different programming languages and compare the results to determine the differences between the languages.

Submission + - How we know North Korea didn't detonate a hydrogen bomb

StartsWithABang writes: The news has been aflame with reports that North Korea detonated a hydrogen bomb on January 6th, greatly expanding its nuclear capabilities with their fourth nuclear test and the potential to carry out a devastating strike against either South Korea or, if they’re more ambitious, the United States. The physics of what a nuclear explosion actually does and how that signal propagates through the air, oceans and ground, however, can tell us whether this was truly a nuclear detonation at all, and if so, whether it was fusion or fission. From all the data we’ve collected, this appears to be nothing new: just a run-of-the-mill fission bomb, with the rest being a sensationalized claim.

Submission + - Seattle Passes First Uber Drivers' Union Into Law (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The city council of Seattle has unanimously voted in favour of a proposal which will require Uber — and driving-related companies which operate on the same principle — to allow its drivers to be represented by a union, the first of its kind in the US. The lead-up to the vote was hallmarked by opposition from Seattle's mayor Ed Murray, and by a publicity campaign from Uber, which opposed the bill. Though the law will allow collective bargaining for drivers which are effectively on zero-hours contracts, any effect it has on current disputes as to whether Uber drivers are employees or contractors will be ambient rather than direct.

Submission + - Germany (probably) responsible for Eurozone crisis

An anonymous reader writes: According to a "descent" opinion by Peter Bofinger, a member of the prominent German Council of Economic Experts which advises the German government, Germany might carry the sole responsibility for the Eurozone crisis. While the consensus narrative is now that "...the Crisis should not be thought of as a government debt crisis in its origin. Instead they regard large intra-Eurozone capital flows that emerged in the decade before the crisis as the real culprit..." but then goes further, declaring that "...While this narrative is correct, it is incomplete. With its focus on the deficit countries, it neglects the role of Germany, by far the largest member state, and its contribution to the imbalances in the years preceding the Crisis."

In the early 2000s, Germany intentionally froze nominal wages, according to a pact agreed between the government and major unions, and thus through lower inflation increased its export competitiveness relative to the other countries of Eurozone. While many will think this is a legitimate action, it is really a textbook example of the "beggar-thy-neighbor" policy, e.g. in the 1930s such policies lead to competing serial devaluations and currency wars. With a common currency this is evidently not possible so that an internal devaluation was invoked, preventing participation of workers in efficiency gains, causing drop in aggregate expenditure which hurt trade partners in the rest of Europe, all while trade surpluses were increasing profits of German corporations which fueled large capital flows to the Eurozone periphery, inflating its real-estate bubbles which burst during the Great Recession. Furthermore, Germany was plunged into having one of the largest minimum-wage workforces among the developed countries.

Submission + - 900 Embedded Devices Share Hard-Coded Certs, SSH Host Keys

An anonymous reader writes: Embedded devices of some 50 manufacturers has been found sharing the same hard-coded X.509 certificates (for HTTPS) and SSH host keys, a fact that can be exploited by a remote, unauthenticated attacker to carry out impersonation, man-in-the-middle, or passive decryption attacks. SEC Consult has analyzed firmware images of more than 4000 embedded devices of over 70 vendors — firmware of routers, IP cameras, VoIP phones, modems, etc. — and found that, in some cases, there are nearly half a million devices on the web using the same certificate.

Slashdot Top Deals

What is now proved was once only imagin'd. -- William Blake

Working...