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Comment Re:Germany is getting smarter (Score 1) 376

Here is VW building a new plant
Here is Daimler's second factory
Here is Seimans

For the regular car maker, the battery is about 1/3-1/2 of the price because they have not gotten their costs down low. OTOH, Tesla has batteries that costs a fraction of what the big players do. As it is, Tesla now sells more batteries than all the rest combined. With the Model 3, it alone will sell more batteries, than the entire rest of the industry, which includes the Model S and X.

The major car makers will be bankrupt again, unless they learn to start making their own cars and parts.

Comment Re: Note that what's large... (Score 3, Informative) 68

Venus has multiple "tropopauses" and "stratospheres", depending on how you define them. The atmosphere is like a layer cake with multiple convection zones (like Earth's troposphere) separated by areas of dynamic stability (like Earth's stratosphere). And again, ~50-70km is an awfullly long way from the surface, and surface winds are weak. But, there's a lot about Venus that we don't understand.

Comment Re:Well Trump has one thing right (Score 1) 529

What complete and utter shite are you spewing?

Actual experience of my wife with H1-B employees (including the "chagrined when discovering the forged credentials" case).

When getting your H1-B you need to provide documentation from your university as proof of your degree. The university must be on a list recognized by the US government. They validate the information with the university rather than just rubberstamping it.

Any of the following would explain that:
  - The agency faked the references, too.
  - The government didn't do the validation you claim it does in every case.
  - The government doesn't do the validation you claim and you're talking through your hat.

Please put your flamage aside for the moment and give us a reference to documentation showing that the government officials actually check credentials, rather than doing spot-checks or taking the applicant's word for them (or bribes).

Comment Note that what's large... (Score 3, Informative) 68

.... is the size, not the intensity. The air moves only slightly faster or slower than the surrounding atmosphere as one passes through the wave.

They weren't expected on Venus, though. Venus's surface is dozens of kilometers down, thick and "soupy" there, transitioning to thinner layers above. It was surprising to see that surface features that far away, in a fluid that can compress, would still make clear phenomena like gravity waves in the high atmosphere.

Comment This is insanely obvious (Score 1) 263

Manning should get a full pardon and a medal of honour. S/he has done more for this country than Biden ever did, and that was after getting a forcible deployment against regimental doctor's orders.

The worst Manning is truly guilty of is exploiting severe violations of DoD regulations by the unit s/he was in. Those violations, and not her actions,compromised national security, as did Manning's superior officer. Those people were under strict orders on not deploying the severely mentally ill into Iraq and to withdraw clearance from such folk, but violated those orders in order to look pretty. That is a serious crime. A crime they, not Chelsea, are guilty of.

Under DoD regulations, computers holding top secret information may NOT be secured by just a password and may NOT support USB devices. I was working for the military when they did the cutover from passwords to passwords plus Class III digital certificate on a smartcard. The USB restriction has been there more-or-less from the introduction of USB, as it violates Rainbow Book standards requiring enforceable multi-level security.

I should not have to point this out on Slashdot, half the three digit IDers were probably involved in writing the standards! And the rest know all this because we had to look the bloody stuff up to get the NSA's SELinux working!

She was also under orders, remember, to ensure that no war crime was concealed by the military. Concealing a war crime, even if that's your sole involvement, is a firing squad offence under international law. Has been since the Nuremberg Trials. Nor is it acceptable to be ordered to carry out such a cover-up. You are forbidden from obeying such orders on pain of death.

Those are the rules. The U.S. military's sole defence is that nobody is big enough to enforce them. If someone did, the U.S. population would be noticeably smaller afterwards. We know that because of Manning.

But Manning's service doesn't end there. Military philosophers, tacticians and strategists will be poring over those notes for decades, running simulations to see when, where and how the U.S. was eventually defeated in Afghanistan and Iraq. They will compare actions carried out with the military philosophies the U.S. officially abandoned in favour of modern theories. They will search for ways in which the new approaches worked and where they should have stuck with the traditional.

Because modern computers can run millions, even billions, of tactical simulations in just a few hours, it is certain that, inside of a decade, someone will have done this and published a book on where the military went wrong and where the Taliban and Iraqi army went wrong as well. This core material allows for that.

These wars may turn out to be our Sun Tzu Moment, when through cataclysmic defeats at the hands of, essentially, barbarians (and make no mistake, they're defeats), a systematic analysis of all that went wrong will be conducted in order to produce a guide on how to have things guaranteed to go right.

Without Manning's data, this couldn't happen. Direct footage, real-time tactical information, logistics, international political interactions, there's enough there to actually do that.

I'd prefer it to be us, because nothing stops the next terror group to form from performing the same study. Historically, it has been shown that a smart army can defeat a confident opponent with superior technology and ten times the numbers, or with inferior technology and a hundred times the numbers. No reason to assume these are hard limits.

If it is us that figures it out, the Pentagon (still fixated on Admiral Poyndexter and his psychic warriors) won't be involved, it'll be people on the outside with more nous and fewer yes-men. And for that, Manning deserves the highest reward.

Besides, it'll annoy the neoconservatives and that's worth their weight in gold-plated latium.

Comment Re:battery life a braindead argument (Score 4, Interesting) 208

Falsehood #2. Wifi is still a pretty uncommon feature, and even when present is fairly problematic, finicky, and requires an unreasonable number of steps to initiate.

Actually, I've never found it finicky. The problem is that the actual maximum speed of wireless is GARBAGE for transferring photos, much less video. Wi-Fi is more than an order of magnitude too slow to be practical. Anybody who thinks otherwise has almost certainly never shot photos with anything more capable than a toy iPhone camera.

To give some context, my brand-new, high-end 5D Mark IV shoots photos that can be from 30–70 megabytes each depending on RAW settings. Even though it supports 802.11n, if memory serves, all devices in IBSS mode (without infrastructure Wi-Fi) are limited to 802.11g speeds. So in practice, unless you bring a Wi-Fi router along with you (no camera supports the captive portal Wi-Fi that you'll find in every hotel on the planet), you'll be limited to only 54 megbits per second.

At 54 megabits per second, transferring a typical daily run of 500 photos at 70 megabytes each takes almost an hour and a half, and that's actually slightly optimistic. I do use the wireless functionality to transfer a few pics at a time from my camera to my iPhone while traveling so that I can quickly post pics from my real camera on Facebook. It works well for that, because I'm only grabbing five or six pics at a time, and I'm getting a much smaller JPEG copy instead of a RAW file.

At night, though, the flash card comes out of the camera and goes into the side of my laptop, where I spend only about four or five minutes to import that entire batch of photos. If Apple had bothered to keep their SD card reader hardware up-to-date, it would take under two minutes, but the two minutes saved isn't worth the hassle of trying to dig a flash card reader out of my bag.

With a laptop that lacks a flash reader, however, the entire equation changes. Suddenly, my choices are to either try to dig out an SD card reader (which will always be hard to dig out of a camera bag) or carry a retractable USB 3.0 cable (which turns out to be easier to put in a place where it is accessible, because it is so thin) and use the camera itself as a reader, albeit with the same poor performance as Apple's old SD card reader, and draining the camera battery the whole time. Both choices are approximately equally bad, and the decision to hobble their hardware by removing such a convenient way of importing content makes me seriously question Apple's commitment to the photography market.

Then again, I never used Aperture. If I had, I'd probably have much stronger negative comments....

And finally, Falsehood #5. What universe are you from? Have you even shopped for cameras ever? I cannot even fathom where you're pulling all this nonsense from.

Pretty much. Apart from cellular phones (where nobody uses the micro-SD slot anyway), pretty much the only cameras that use micro-SD are the little cameras built by GoPro. All pro cameras use either CF or full-size SD, because when the camera isn't a tiny little toy, the size savings of micro-SD aren't enough of a benefit to make up for the smaller contact size and the resulting decrease in reliability and robustness.

Nothing you say is true to the point where you're either delusional or trolling.

Trolling, I'd imagine. Either that or it's an Apple employee astroturfing. Hard to say which.

Comment Re: Bradley Manning needs a HOSTS file (Score 1) 263

Define "male". Not in terms of social norms - those vary between societies. And, since you didn't accept the suggestion of a genetics test, you don't get to use that either. Historical records are of no interest, you weren't there when they were made so you can't vouch for them. Besides, plenty of species have individuals change gender. History proves nothing.

You could try a neurological test, but I'll wager you that it shows Manning to be female. The feelings come from the brain, there's no such thing as a spirit outside of hard liquor.

So what have you got to offer?

Comment Re:Just what the world needed most urgently... (Score 1) 184

Interesting, given that micro plugs are rated for more insertions than minis:
"The newer Micro-USB receptacles are designed for a minimum rated lifetime of 10,000 cycles of insertion and removal between the receptacle and plug, compared to 1,500 for the standard USB and 5,000 for the Mini-USB receptacle." [ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... ]

Comment Needed environment for me is 7, 7pro, 8, 8.1 only (Score 1) 442

Meanwhile Win 3.11... Is still running fine on test equipment. The manufacturer says do not upgrade to any other version of Windows.

I have a gang-programming-and-testing production tool from one of the top three (or so) manufacturers of BLE systems-on-a-chip. Our startup needs this (or a suitable alternative) to go into volume production of our initial products.

It comes with an application - in source in a build environment. This allows it to be customized, to add tests for the peripherals added to make the final assembly, and to integrate into production processes and databases.

But the build environment is only supported in Windows 7, 7 Pro, 8, and 8.1, using Visual Studio 2012. The executables and DLLs produced run only on those or XP.

The executable/DLLs use .NET, too, and the way they use it breaks the GUI under wine, even with genuine Microsoft .NET installed. They run correctly, but the status display is corrupted in a way that makes it unusable. So at the production site it needs to run on genuine Windows at one of those levels. B-b

As of the last time I checked (a couple months ago), the manufacturer is unwilling to port to another OS or version - even though all of them (except maybe 7 Pro) have been end-of-lifed by Microsoft.

Comment Re:FAA wil not allow it (Score 1) 126

A flying vehicle adds 4 additional degrees of freedom (up-down, pitch, roll, yaw)... so much more that can go wrong.

Current flying vehicles have those extra degrees of freedom because of their design, but in principle, you could design a flying vehicle that has only one additional degree of freedom (altitude), keeping the vehicle approximately horizontal at all times and using horizontally oriented secondary fans to steer. And arguably, you should, because at that point, it would be much more practical for a driver to take control if needed.

Comment Re:Is it a car or a drone by another name? (Score 1) 126

A car that is light enough to get off the ground is too fragile to survive a collision of any consequence.

I think the key phrase is "Self-driving". If there's any significant collision risk, the car could simply go straight up to avoid it. Surviving on-ground collisions should be basically a non-goal at that point.

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