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Comment For example (Score 1) 10

Blocklist: Trump, Hilary, Clinton, DNC, RNC, Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Green, gun control, s**t, f**k, h**l, ...

Actual posts filtered:

  • Google Trumps Apple as #1 on NASDAQ
  • California Drought Finally Over? Green Grass Says "Maybe"
  • Shitake Mushrooms Pulled Over E. Coli Concerns
  • Hello. My Name is...

Word bans don't work. They never did. To do this right would involve significant amounts of machine learning, and you wouldn't need a list of things to ban if they were doing that.

Comment Re:For those who may have forgotten (Score 3, Interesting) 55

Are you kidding? The breakup removed Bell's ability to prevent people from attaching arbitrary non-Bell equipment to the phone lines, which made modems practical, which basically made the Internet viable. It also made multiple long distance carriers available to a lot more people than had options previously, which was responsible for a lot of the cash that Sprint eventually used to build a cellular network. So basically, we have the Internet and multiple cellular carriers because the government broke up Ma Bell.

Comment Re:Teams (Score 1) 244

There's only one sane way for companies to respond: by continuing to post about the Ol****cs, but avoid using any of their trademarked terminology. For example, they could censor it (eg. Ol****c G***s), or even better, use hashtag #LameGames reflecting the way they are running things.

And if they sue, countersue. Try for at least a ten-figure payout.

Comment Re:Headphone Jack is Pretty Crappy (Score 5, Informative) 533

So what's the objection to everyone using BT headsets? People hate wires today.

In no particular order:

  • Hitting pause on NetFlix, then hitting play again, and having no sound for the first two seconds, thus missing half a line of dialog
  • Relatively poor sound quality
  • Having a radio transmitter basically in my ear
  • Having another device to charge every day, and possibly more than once per day

That first one by itself is a showstopper for me. The rest just add more reasons to question the sanity of Apple's upper management. Not that I needed more reasons to question their sanity given that they're still trying to make the d**n things thinner even after they were forced to reengineer parts of the iPhone 6 Plus to fix bending problems....

Comment Re:Headphone Jack is Pretty Crappy (Score 4, Insightful) 533

This has been my experience as well. Not every jack fails - but it still happens more often than for any other jack type that I commonly use.

If that is true, then it is true because it is the jack that you use far more often than any other type of jack. I treat headphones like crap, and headphone jacks even more horribly. The last time I had one actually break was on a PowerBook 145 (where I broke at least two or three headphone jacks). Even with massive abuse, I haven't broken one in any hardware built in the past twenty years.

On my first iPhone, I did have one instance where the jack thought headphones were plugged in when they weren't. That took a little bit of jiggling with a pair of headphones to resolve. But at no point have I ever seen a modern jack break. Not in my gear, not in gear belonging to anyone I know.

I have, however, seen Lightning plugs break off in the jacks. Not only will you lose your headphones when that happens, but also the ability to charge your phone. On the plus side, Apple is going to sell a LOT more AppleCare plans after people break their third or fourth Lightning jack. So my stock loves the idea....

Comment Re: How? (Score 1) 346

The reason that companies like Logitech get cranky is that they assume the goods are probably grey market imports, which you're allowed to do, but you have to clearly advertise the fact that it has no U.S. warranty. But if you have receipts to prove that it was purchased in the U.S., they have no legal grounds to challenge you reselling it as new.

Last I checked, most (if not all) major retailers routinely take unopened returns and put them back on the shelves as new. So if the law considers those to not be new, then that is the most consistently ignored law in the history of the world. And I've dug through California's code, and I see nothing that defines "new" in any way other than "not used". And an unopened package clearly precludes use of the product, so at least in California, I'm about 99% sure that you're wrong. Obviously the answer may vary from state to state, but it seems unlikely that an unopened product could ever be considered anything but new by a reasonable person.

Again, as I said, for automobiles, the law is explicitly different. Once it is transferred to a non-dealer, it is considered used. But as far as I know, that is the only product for which this is the case, and only because there is a specific body of law that explicitly defines the transfer of an automobile to a consumer as "use".

Comment Re:How? (Score 1) 346

Yes, even to a toaster oven, there is a legal definition of "NEW" and if you buy it at Walmart and resell it on Amazon, it is actually no longer "NEW".

As far as I know, there's no commonly accepted legal definition of "new". That's why various companies like eBay and Amazon explicitly describe what is meant by "new". Through most of those channels, "new" does not mean "sold by a licensed dealer", but rather "unopened". Up until you open the packaging, something is generally considered "new", no matter how many times it changes hands, and no matter whose hands it goes through in the process, because there's no practical difference between purchasing a product directly from a store and purchasing it from someone who purchased it from a store, so long as no warranty registration occurred. (You should, of course, apply for a tax exemption if you resell new items frequently, because otherwise you're getting charged sales tax twice, but that's orthogonal.)

The only absolute exceptions I can think of are vehicle sales, where "new" means "never previously owned by anyone who isn't a car dealer licensed by the manufacturer," but that's more an artifact of the way cars are sold than anything else (no packaging, franchise dealerships, etc.), and doesn't really apply to consumer goods.

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