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Comment Re:T-Mobile, despite issues (Score 1) 99

same here. For the price and extras they are the best deal for me. Coverage is fine and I travel overseas so the free data and texting are a big plus. I can Skype on the slow speed data just fine so calling works and my clients Skype routinely so they are used to reaching people that way, and 90% of my needs are covered by texting for non-business needs. Even with clients a quick text is generally the prefered method anyway. Their customer service is great, any issues I have had with billing were resolved quickly. The last time I had a problem they even credited a full months service, above what I was owed, for my troubles even though I only asked them to credit what I was owed. The free line lets me use unlimited data on my iPad; before that the 200mb free per month let me use email without any overage. Coverage is good as I live in a major metropolitan area. I'm paying 1/2 of what I paid with ATT so I left them after quite a few years and don't regret it. YMMV but my mileage is fine.The best hint that happened for consumers, IMHO, is ATT didn't buy them so T-Mobile has been able to shake up the industry to everyone's benefit. ATT, in contrast, sent me bills for 0 dollars every month for a year before they realized I was no longer with ATT; even though they had already ported my number to another carrier. When I calle dream they said since I was on a corporate account they could not close the account unless the person in charge of phones closed the account. I worked for a major international company who had no one "in charge of phones" and all it took to get their rate was for me to call ATT and say I worked at X and they put me on the account. I eventually had a friend still there call, say they were in charge of phones and to take me off the account. ATT's coverage was great but their customer service wasn't; at one point I kept getting transferred from corporate accounts to personal ones, while I tried to get them to fix the problem, because neither could figure out who was responsible for it since it was my personal number with a corporate rate. As I have had the number for years, even pre ATT when I was on VZW so I could not afford to lose the number and have clients all of a sudden not reach me or get a black mark on my credit score for not paying 0 dollars. When I asked what would happen if I simply didn't pay if I had a bill they said "No problem we just would bill the corporate account and not cut off service." At one point I even called the President's office to get it fixed (I had a friend who worked with the CEO so he gave me the number to call) and even they couldn't figure it out. My friend there said if I didn't pay they would just write off the loss eventually; but I didn't want to go that route as it wouldn't be right. They magically stopped billing me finally and all is well but I would not want to be held hostage by the Death Star so I will not go back to them. I also had VZW for a few years and was happy with their service. VZW, while they were a lot better than ATT and even sent me new phones for free before my contract was up, their CDMA technology limited my ability to use a phone overseas and I didn't want to have to get a new number on a prepaid card every time I traveled and give clients a new number every time I traveled. I realize they now have world phones but since TMobile meets my needs there is no compelling reason to go back to VZW.

Comment Re:If the NSA wasn't evil (Score 1) 79

They would immediately tell Intel, Microsoft, and Mr Torvalds exactly what flaws they are exploiting so they could be closed. Instead, being the evil assholes they are, they won't tell anyone. Cuz we all know the NSA is smarter than the Chinese, Russians, and random hacker groups who exploit the same holes.

I guess it's a difference of philosophy. I want my computing to be as secure as possible. The NSA wants to hack anyone's system at anytime.

My philosophy is comment sense, the NSA's is pure evil considering it lessens my security.

Wrong. The government is ordering to put the flaw in!! If Snowden is correct under the American Patriot Act they can arrest those who do not comply making their products with backdoors so the government doesn't have to get a court order.

To me that is pure evil. You think Apple and Android LOVE putting in hidden apps that secret turn your phones into recording devices that send the GPS and conversations wihtout you knowing while appearing off?

Comment It makes sense (not in a bad way) (Score 1) 27

Reason being is Salesforce is kind of scaring me as too powerful and a threat to I.T. jobs.

If it is cross platform which MS is heading too we can put down the hate on MS like its 1999 still. From what I gather is it is not ads, but rather MS won the desktop wars by integrating and doing proprietary tricks to link stuff together ALA Visual Basic COM objects. You had everything tie together.

Today in 2017 Windows is not longer the guerala. But MS is hardly dead in the workplace. So instead of integrating components and doing proprietary standards they are doing open standards with TypeScript, .NET, Android in Visual Studio, SQL Server for Linux, Powershell for Mac/Linux, and MS Code editor for Linux, and embracing Linux Vms, and even making MS Code available for Linux and Mac. Their browsers are all fully W3C compliant now and Office 365 is the reason why.

So MS is doing the data and service integration instead. If the company owner, your employees, and yourself all use LinkedIn, Yammer, and other tools which run on multiplatforms it gets rid of a reason to use Salesforce.com.

MS maybe getting too powerful in this area but Office 365 is rapidly getting more apps and mobile programs like Dwell, PowerBI, etc. LinkedIN is the glue that ties this together to keep business to business relationships on the ecosystem ... rather than crappy COM win32 standards.

Comment Re:Pilots don't work (Score 1) 320

Will a child growing up in a UBI household have a different attitude towards the need to get a job or attend school? Is there even any point in getting an education if you know that the state will provide everything - and that there probably won't be any jobs for you anyway?

Well we have research on welfare clients here in Norway indicates it might be "inheritable", but not massively so. So I think it would be more "as a child in an UBI society..." and as for the latter I assume basic will mean quite basic. Here in Norway you have a basic guarantee (sosialstønad) if you are a legal resident and have no savings or other means to support yourself, for singles it's 5950 NOK + housing which in USD is about $700/month, but since Norway is more expensive it's effectively $500/month. And housing can easily mean a 100 sqft room with shared kitchen and bathroom facilities.

Essentially if you take your basic needs like food, clothes, personal care, a monthly card for public transportation and misc. household articles the budget is nearly spent. You can afford a microwave, cellphone, a TV, a crap PC and that's it. You're not going to any pubs, cafes, restaurants, concerts, cinemas or theaters. You don't have a car. You're not going on any vacations. You exist comfortably, if all you want is a $15/month WoW subscription. Most people want a little more in life...

Comment Re:Privacy (Score 3, Interesting) 65

Seems that the US is actually the anomaly, having a high GDP *but* happily providing all their personal information to be abused by marketeers/advertiser, by three-letter agencies, and by pirates leaking databases and personal photo collections.

I dunno if it is so much "happily provide", but likely last not, too uneducated, ill-informed, or ignorant of the fact that massive data even IS being collected on them, much less the implications of such massive data collection and analyzation can do the people and their privacy.

I'm guessing that sure, a lot of folks wouldn't care, but I would posit that the majority of the populace using social media even is NOT aware of the massive information collection going on, nor how it is used.

Comment Re:FSF = not practical (Score 2) 152

When he started there was no such thing as an entire operating system of free software and no hardware you could run it on. This exists today - it didn't then. It's not as readily and easily available as it should be - but it exists. And, as he rightfully pointed out, if he had compromised the ideal of that existing - it would still not exist at all. It only exists because he never settled for less than that.

Well evil tounges would suggest that without Linus we'd still be waiting on GNU/Hurd. GCC forked off and became ECGS. "Linux libc" forked away from glibc and was only later "gnu-ified" again like ECGS. The rest the FSF made seems mostly to be small utilities, for sure having a GNU/free ls, awk, sed, grep etc. is important but hardly the showstopper. His one (admittedly huge) crowning achievement was writing the GPL, but most the projects seemed to refuse his leadership.

And even then the adoption by some of the core players seemed to be more by chance than ideological success, like Linus primarily wanted to see what other developers were doing to learn so he could run it on his box. User freedom was never a big deal for him nor most other Linux kernel core developers, which is why the GPLv3 was met with a "meh". X11 and Wayland doesn't use the GPL. Apache isn't using the GPL. Android isn't using the GPL except the kernel. It is popular? Yes. Is it the only commonly used open source license? Very far from it.

According to Black Duck GPLv3 + LGPLv3 + Affero GPL = ~10% of all projects and GPLv2 + LGPLv2 ~20% so most projects haven't really been following Stallman since 2007. And that's not counting the non-GPL licenses, my impression is that the Apache license has gained a lot of popularity particularly with corporations like Google (Android), Apple (Swift) and Microsoft (ASP.Net). The kernel is the one project that seems to get away with copyleft because you can run any userspace on top. And because it doesn't really crack down on shims and driver blobs.

Comment Not really (Score 1) 371

I work far more with SQL than programming languages really, but I do work a lot with doing operations on large data sets so I definitively try to avoid looping through a million rows. I use in-memory or temp tables to chain operations without storing state. And that's all neat and well, but without a ton of state in between those set operations to say what's ready, what's running, what's done etc. I'd go nuts. The functional bits are the stretches between the state almost like barriers in computer shaders and other synchronization methods. A pure functional application well I couldn't really imagine it unless it read one file as input and spit out a result, it just flows through the whole application. Every time I try to understand state in FP my head hurts.

Comment Re:FSF = not practical (Score 1) 152

Stallman is more like the kind of political extremist who would tell everybody not to vote because it perpetuates the system. He doesn't force anybody to do anything, he only forces himself and suggests to others. Forcing is what he's against.

And how is this not wanting to use the force of law to impose his ideological views on others?

"Instead of the DMCA, which makes it a crime to show people how to break DRM, it should be a crime to make, import or lease or sell devices with DRM," Stallman says. "Both the players and the media. It should be a crime. The executives of the companies that are now pulling the strings of the W3C, they should go to jail for doing DRM. "

Comment El nino would cool Great Barrier (Score 1) 93

Last I checked the western hemisphere's tropical and subtropical oceans warm while the eastern cool during an El Nino, while the opposite is true during a La Nina. We had one of the longest La Ninas lasting many years until last year which is why the California drought became so severe.

Am I wrong?

Comment Re:Fortran (Score 1) 616

I'm not quite old enough to have used FORTRAN.

What does age have to do with anything? I took a computational linear algebra course in the late '90s that used FORTRAN nearly exclusively.

That said, I started out, like most kids in the '80s, with BASIC and assembly language (6809 and 6502, in my case). I started college early enough that the introductory computer-science courses were still in Pascal, but pretty much every course that needed to do real work used anything but Pascal...lots of C, with a systems-programming course splitting time between 8086 assembly and VAX assembly and a database course that introduced us to SQL (of course).

The computational linear algebra course mentioned above was a math course specifically for computer-science majors; other engineering students took a different linear-algebra course.

Comment Re:We ran the same calculus (Score 1) 214

However....backup, anti-virus, spam filtering, and a DR solution drives up the cost very quickly.

The marginal cost of backup and DR when you're *already* doing those things for an on-prem server environment is pretty close to zero, and if you're already virtualized and have a virtual-oriented backup software you probably already have DR integrated into your backup. AV and anti-spam are almost always done best these days by a third party service and the good ones do both anyway.

From the numbers I've run, it usually is cheaper to do it on prem above about 50 users with a 3 year benchmark. If you time the upgrade right, you can probably get 5 years out of it without falling more than a rev behind and cut the 50 user number way down.

It's pretty obvious Microsoft is heading subscription-only for everything. Since 2013, Exchange has lost much of its GUI which I think has been a way to scare on-prem admins away. They will ultimately either price on prem high enough that only a few compliance/security focused large organizations will consider it or support hybrid only (meaning you're paying for O365, used or not).

Cloud is about permanent vendor-lock in and rent-seeking, not economics. The marginal cost of a 5-9s commercial data center for hosting cloud services is greater than the marginal savings to users, which is why hosted systems always end up being so expensive unless you're doing something really trivial like a static web site.

You guys are somethign else. You bashed WIndows NT and then called Windows Server for years for not having a CLI. Hey look at Unix we do not have to sit in front of the server to admin it etc. Now MS has powershell and it is BEH WHERE IS THE GUI?! Exchange is a very complex project because many organizations have complex uses. If your admin can't handle scripting and commands then he is incompetent. If you are paying someone +$75,000 a year he or she should be a master at that price and have years of experience.

Comment Re: Time to switch (Score 1) 214

Dude it is 2017. Wordperfect and Lotus 123 lost. Deal with it. The world runs on Microsoft. You can't have your sales team making documents misformatting in potential clients computers. Customers make custom Sharepoint sites and use MS teams to arrange things.

I am not saying this as a super MS fanboy. I am just stating reality. If Libreoffice was around in the early days of the internet in the 1990s maybe this wouldn't be a thing, but the office runs on MS and Intune, Office, Skype, Sharepoint, MS project, etc.

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