Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Trust the World's Fastest VPN with Your Internet Security & Freedom - A Lifetime Subscription of PureVPN at 88% off. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:Boo hoo, just stop rainwater from leaching lead (Score 1) 115

You might not think so, because elemental lead is not water-soluble. However compounds of lead like hydroxides or carbonates are soluble and can form from elemental lead by contact with water, e.g., 2Pb + O2 + 2H2O -> 2 Pb(OH)2.

This is why it's perfectly safe to drink wine from leaded crystal wine glasses, but a bad idea to store wine in a leaded crystal decanter.

Comment Software freedom for cars is necessary. (Score 1) 82

I don't think that will be sufficient or even a good plan for the car owner.

The correct and complete solution is simple (and it's high time /. readers start endorsing this to each other and to their Congressional representatives): complete corresponding source code for all of the car's software licensed to the car owner under a free software license. I recommend the AGPLv3 or later in order to help maintain software freedom when people provide remote services to do this job. This would allow the car owner to have an application they trust running on and in the car which allows them to list all connections to other parties and selectively break whichever connections they wish ad-hoc. Few dealers would prefer this because it cuts them out of the loop; only dealers that genuinely want you to have the best available support and service, even extending beyond the dealer's business.

Practical problems with a dealer-only arrangement include: no possibility of getting this fixed ad-hoc (dealers in the US often don't do business on Sundays) which means your privacy means less to them than their ability to engineer new monopolies, no way to trust that the connection to someone's monitor is complete (you're trusting the dealer not to screw you but they have already shown a desire to do that in other ways), dealers are like any other business in that they sometimes go out of business which leaves car owners in the dark for getting this operation done, cooperative dealers are sometimes too far to realistically deal with (if I sell the car from the US mainland to someone in Hawaii they won't want to ship the car back to get this done because their Hawaiian dealer either doesn't exist or isn't cooperative).

Comment Re:Boo hoo, just stop rainwater from leaching lead (Score 1) 115

So as long as you keep the lead from escaping into groundwater (could bury them in a landfill with a clay or plastic lining in a big mountain), this is fine. If lead prices are so cheap that it's easier to mine new lead than it is to recycle it from CRT glass,

True, and true, with reservations. Somebody has got to pay for keeping the lead from escaping into groundwater. Should it be everyone, or the people who benefited from the use of the lead?

And if everyone pays, human nature being what it is people will pay to make the problem "go away" without looking too closely at the details, where "go away" includes "making it someone else's problem."

The thing is, if you could completely internalize all those expenses so the cost of dealing with never just "went away", the market would do a fine job of efficiently managing lead and disposal management as a resource. But that doesn't happen naturally, by itself.

Comment Re:Travel phone (Score 1) 403

You *do* need Facebook to log in to various other services. I used it, until recently, for Tinder, for example.

This doesn't mean you actually have to post stuff on there, or do anything substantive with it besides use it as a login service. The only things I use my FB account for are logins (and not even that at the moment; I have a girlfriend now so I don't log into Tinder now), and being "friends" with a few distant friends and not-so-distant family members who insist on using it. I never post anything.

Comment Re:Shiva Ayyadurai is a fraud. (Score 3, Interesting) 66

Well, it's possible that he's mildly delusional, as most of us are about beliefs about ourselves that we hold dear.

It strikes me that Ayyadurai is in a legal catch-22 situation. Let's suppose for a moment he did "invent" email. That would make him a public figure, and the legal standard used to establish defamation is "actual malice. That's a difficult standard to meet.

I assume Ayyadurai's complaint are claims that he is a "fake" or a "liar". Suppose some random shmoe is interviewing for a job, and you tell the interviewer that he's a "liar". That is defamation, unless you have actual reason to believe he is a liar. But if you say the same thing about a politician running for office, it's NOT defamation unless you have actual reason to believe he is NOT a liar. That's because the politician is a public figure.

It seems to me nearly impossible to defame someone by calling him a liar in the context of his claiming to invent anything. His very demand to be recognized for his achievement makes him a public figure, whether that claim is true or not.

Comment Re:simple (Score 1) 403

I don't have a dropbox account (truthfully), so I can't give that up.

You can claim you don't have a Google account, if you're not carrying an Android phone. Carry a Windows phone and it'll seem believable. With the current popularity of Windows Phones (hehe), you should be able to get one of those really, really cheap now.

Comment Re:Are local managers more destructive ? (Score 3, Interesting) 128

The only reason they can possibly be more productive is that the local management is toxic.

Oh come on. Local management not being toxic is the exception, not the rule. It's a rare workplace where you have really effective and competent management (and I don't mean just one manager, I mean the whole chain; I've had good direct managers, but they were hamstrung by the idiocy directly above them).

Comment Re:Seriously WTF? (Score 1) 403

Look, I'm sorry but this whole thread is about the gestapo like police force you've allowed

your willingness to put up with it

Organize yourselves America, start calling your "representatives"

What's that going to do? We've voted these people into office. That's the way representative democracy works: you elect someone to do the job the way they think it should be done, after they've campaigned and told you their positions. None of this is a surprise with these politicians. Calling them now isn't going to make a difference; most of their constituents are happy with the way they're doing their jobs: Congress is infamous for most Americans being extremely *un*happy with its performance, *except* for their own Congressman who they love. These representatives already are doing the jobs we've elected them to do. A minority of us bitching and complaining isn't going to change things, because most Americans *like* it this way, or they wouldn't have voted this way.

Comment Re:Travel phone (Score 1) 403

So if there is no evidence of an email account, no settings for connecting to it, or no evidence of use of social media on the phone or laptop you are carrying with you can you still be compelled to provide that information?

How? How would they know you have an email account someplace unless you tell them?

Now they could give you a hard time if you refuse to give them access to *any* email account. But that's easily solved: create a fake email account (Yahoo is perfect for this!) that you don't do anything with except receive some ads or something at. Give them the password to that one.

Social media is a little trickier. Perhaps you could disable your FB account before crossing the border? Claiming you have no such account could get you in trouble if they do a quick search with your name and find one that's obviously yours.

Slashdot Top Deals

The party adjourned to a hot tub, yes. Fully clothed, I might add. -- IBM employee, testifying in California State Supreme Court

Working...