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Comment Re:Look up laws on booby traps (Score 1) 205

Hence what I said about "overly literal geeks". You think so long as you can find something that you consider to be logically consistent, that'll work and you are out of trouble. I'm telling you that is NOT how it works in a court. They very much take the "reasonable man" approach and factor in intent. Doesn't matter how clever you think you are, what matters is what the law says and how the judge applies it.

Comment Re: No More Muslims (Score 1) 422

That's not how voting works. The US is divided into "electoral votes" which basically is divided up among states (and in some cases, counties). Trump got ~57% of the "country's" vote, you don't vote directly which is what many Dems are missing in these cases, popular votes don't matter, have never mattered.

Comment Re:Well there would be a lot of it (Score 1) 56

That's a pretty big "if". The escape velocity of a star, even a brown dwarf, is pretty high, and if you though that the Earth's atmosphere got in the way of space flight, whew! They'd need to go directly to nuclear rocket.

Then there's the question of how large the minimum intelligent entity would be. They need to be diffuse enough to float. Whoops, that means that their brain "cells" need to communicate with each other via wireless transmission. And that implies at each entity would need a huge transmission spectrum. Possibly they could do it at the microwave level, but they might need to go to terahertz or infrared. But the diffuse means that they require an immense volume.

Then there's the question of what they build the vehicle out of. It has to be something that will float in the area of the cloud within which they can live...or they've got to have some kind of remote manipulator.

I really think that space flight is extremely unlikely for this kind of life form. But they might well be able to think extremely well. Possibly they would be "inherently telepathic" to the extent of only having a group mind, as the individual floating entity would probably be too simple to be intelligent.

Comment Re:Just blacklist the keywords of a click bait (Score 1) 107

I don't think that would suffice, though it's certainly a reasonable weighing consideration. And what they specified as the technique wouldn't suffice, either, though it would reduce the fake news considerably. And invite a "fake news" arms race.

At some point verification requires somebody you reasonably trust actually going and checking. I suppose a video might count, but you need to consider that every video is going to provide you with a biased view, selected by the angles from which observation happens. And fake videos aren't unknown, so you need to start including ways to detect whether the video was altered...which invites another arms race.

And you'll never be really sure. You shouldn't be sure of even things that you personally saw, because memory is fallible.

So consider this program as something that improves the signal-to-noise ratio. If that's the goal there are lots of things that can be done, and the early versions should be succeeded by more advanced versions for a long time. And even the early things are useful.

For comparison, consider the progress in e-mail filters. And the twin problems of false positives and false negatives. Now imagine trying to do without ANY e-mail filter.

Comment Re:Those who something, something (Score 1) 422

>Left-wing government-funded "news" service

If you think that NPR is left wing, you are a fucking idiot. It hasn't been left wing since the end of the Clinton administration. Indeed, it has become completely corporatist since then.

There isn't any"left wing" on media today except outside of the us and random YouTube channels. It's all corporate oriented programming, especially considering that the mainstream media is owned by just a handful of companies.

Lastly, the Koch brothers are major donors to NPR.

Wake the fuck up.

--
BMO

Comment Re:Curing Greed. (Score 1) 426

You've probably heard that it takes money to make money. It's true.The more money you have the more you can make. Loop forever.

More concretely. Lets say you and I both start businesses making widgets. People like widgets. But I have more money than you, so I can get a 10% discount on widget parts by ordering in larger quantities. So I can sell my widgets for less than you can. So I sell my widgets and make money and you get stuck with a stock of widgets.

It could be a number of factors. Perhaps I can afford to sell at a loss long enough to drive your business under (AKA dumping). Perhaps I own my factory building outright and you have to pay rent for yours. Every month, I see ROI on my property and you flush rent down the toilet. Your landlord might make more money on your business than you do.

This will always be true (as Marx suggests) unless government specifically intervenes and makes it a regulated market.

Comment Re:Bad Headline (Score 1) 422

The other companies gave no answer, which for any company that didn't have a history of inadvertently enabling genocide was IMO the right thing to do. Such political trolling really shouldn't even be dignified with a response, in general.

But you're right about IBM. Ethically speaking, they should have been the first to say no, given what happened the last time they helped with a database of everyone in a particular religious group. Then again, it is also possible that because IBM and its employees were not punished for their role in enabling the Holocaust, the bean counters that run the place would dutifully enable another one. Scary thought.

Submission + - Virginia spent over half a million on cell surveillance that mostly doesn't work (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: In 2014, the Virginia State Police spent $585,265 on a specially modified Suburban outfitted with the latest and greatest in cell phone surveillance: The DRT 1183C, affectionately known as the DRTbox. But according to logs uncovered by public records website MuckRock, the pricey ride was only used 12 times — and only worked 7 of those times. Read the full DRTbox documents at MuckRock.

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