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Submission + - Star Trek Fan Forced to Surrender 'ASIMIL8' License Plate for Being Offensive (gizmodo.com)

schwit1 writes: A Star Trek fan in Canada has been forced to turn over his personalized license plate after people complained its message, ASIMIL8, was insulting to indigenous people.

Manitoba Public Insurance revoked Nick Troller’s personalized license plate that read ASIMIL8, a nod to the Borg in Star Trek. According to a report in the Toronto Star, Troller had been driving around with it for two years, and it was accompanied by a license frame that said “We Are the Borg” and “Resistance is Futile.” Troller said fellow fans liked his license plate and asked to take pictures with it, and complained that critics were being too sensitive about the issue.

Submission + - Robots hit the streets -- and the streets hit back (cnn.com)

An anonymous reader writes: As robots begin to appear on sidewalks and streets, they're being hazed and bullied. Last week, a drunken man allegedly tipped over a 300-pound security robot in Mountain View, California... Knightscope, which makes the robot that was targeted in Mountain View, said it's had three bullying incidents since launching its first prototype robot three years ago. In 2014, a person attempted to tackle a Knightscope robot. Last year in Los Angeles, people attempted to spray paint a Knightscope robot. The robot sensed the paint and sounded an alarm, alerting local security and the company's engineers... the robot's cameras filmed the pranksters' license plate, making it easy to track them down.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How would you build a global wireless mesh network? 1

An anonymous reader writes: How would you start a grassroots effort to build a self organizing global radio mesh network where all devices can communicate with all other devices and where there is no central authority. There is nothing in the rules of mathematics or laws of physics that prevents such a system. But how would you break the problem up so it could be crowd funded and sourced? How would you build the radios? And what about government spectrum rules? This seems like biggest blocker. How would you persuade governments to allow for the use of say, 1%, of the spectrum for an unlicensed mesh experiment? In the US it would probably take a Act of Congress to overrule the FCC but a grassroots effort with potential for major technology advances backed by celebrity scientists might be enough to tilt the issue but would there be enough motivation? Thanks for any advice, hints, suggestions, insults, etc.. I love all of you:)

Submission + - Access to Wikipedia blocked in Turkey (turkeypurge.com)

stikves writes: It looks like another major Internet service is blocked in Turkey, hopefully for a short time. Wikipedia is the subject to a latest ban, and unfortunately more details are not available:

Access to Wikipedia has been blocked in Turkey as a result of “a provisional administrative order” imposed by the Turkish Telecommunications Authority (BTK).
The Internet Freedom watchdog, the Turkey Blocks said it has verified restrictions affecting the Wikipedia online encyclopedia in Turkey. “A block affecting all language editions of the website detected at 8:00AM local time Saturday 29 April,” the watchdog said on Saturday.
Turkey Blocks said an administrative blocking order is usually expected to precede a full court blocking order in coming days.
While the reason for the order was unknown early on Saturday, a statement on the BTK’s website said: “After technical analysis and legal consideration based on the Law Nr. 5651, ADMINISTRATION MEASURE has been taken for this website (wikipedia.org) according to Decision Nr. 490.05.01.2017.-182198 dated 29/04/2017 implemented by Information and Communication Technologies Authority.”

Submission + - Wikipedia blocked in Turkey (turkeyblocks.org)

Ilgaz writes: The Turkey Blocks monitoring network has verified restrictions affecting the Wikipedia online encyclopaedia in Turkey. A block affecting all language editions of the website detected at 8:00AM local time Saturday 29 April. The loss of availability is consistent with internet filters used to censor content in the country.

Submission + - A Russian-controlled telecom hijacked 24 Financial Services' Internet Traffic (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: On Wednesday, large chunks of network traffic belonging to MasterCard, Visa, and more than two dozen other financial services companies were briefly routed through a Russian government-controlled telecom under unexplained circumstances that renew lingering questions about the trust and reliability of some of the most sensitive Internet communications.

Anomalies in the border gateway protocol—which routes large-scale amounts of traffic among Internet backbones, ISPs, and other large networks—are common and usually the result of human error. While it's possible Wednesday's five- to seven-minute hijack of 36 large network blocks may also have been inadvertent, the high concentration of technology and financial services companies affected made the incident "curious" to engineers at network monitoring service BGPmon. What's more, the way some of the affected networks were redirected indicated their underlying prefixes had been manually inserted into BGP tables, most likely by someone at Rostelecom, the Russian government-controlled telecom that improperly announced ownership of the blocks.

Submission + - Open Ports Create Backdoors in Millions of Smartphones (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Mobile applications that open ports on Android smartphones are opening those devices to remote hacking, claims a team of researchers from the University of Michigan. Researchers say they've identified 410 popular mobile apps that open ports on people's smartphones. They claim that an attacker could connect to these ports, which in turn grant access to various phone features, such as photos, contacts, the camera, and more. This access could be leveraged to steal photos, contacts, or execute commands on the target's phone. Researchers recorded various demos to prove their attacks. Of these 410 apps, there were many that had between 10 and 50 million downloads on the official Google Play Store and even an app that came pre-installed on an OEMs smartphones.

Research on the mobile open port problem started after researchers read a Trend Micro report from 2015 about a vulnerability in the Baidu SDK, which opened a port on user devices, providing an attacker with a way to access the phone of a user who installed an app that used the Baidu SDK. That particular vulnerability affected over 100 million smartphones, but Baidu moved quickly to release an update.

The paper detailing the team's work is entitled Open Doors for Bob and Mallory: Open Port Usage in Android Apps and Security Implications, and was presented Wednesday, April 26, at the 2nd IEEE European Symposium on Security and Privacy that took place this week in Paris, France.

Submission + - MIT creates 3D-printing robot that can construct a home off-grid in 14 hours (mit.edu)

Kristine Lofgren writes: Home building hasn't changed much over the years, but leave it to MIT to take things to the next level. A new technology built at MIT can construct a simple dome structure in 14 hours and it's powered by solar panels, so you can take it to remote areas. MIT's 3D-printing robot can construct the entire basic structure of a building and can be customized to fit the local terrain in ways that traditional methods can't do. It even has a built-in scoop so it can prepare the building site and gather its own construction materials.

Submission + - Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing' (yahoo.com)

boley1 writes: Elon Musk on why he doesn't like flying cars: 'That is not an anxiety-reducing situation'.

According to Musk, the main challenges with flying cars are that they'll be noisy and generate lots of wind because of the downward force required to keep them in the air. Plus, there's an anxiety factor.

"Let's just say if something is flying over your head...that is not an anxiety-reducing situation," he said. "You don’t think to yourself 'Well, I feel better about today. You’re thinking'Is it going to come off and guillotine me as it comes flying past?'

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