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Submission + - Programming Languages We Love to Hate But Can't Live Without

snydeq writes: Tools masquerading as languages, maddening syntax, dusty code that won’t die — InfoWorld's PeterWayner discusses seven programming languages we love to hate even though we can't live without them. 'From Gödel and Turing, we’ve learned that logical mechanisms have edges where scary things occur. Sure, maybe it’s our own fault, we humans, for misusing or misprogramming. But if the programming languages force our brains into weird yoga poses, it’s hard not to blame them for our ills,' Wayner writes. 'And we often can’t do anything about it. The installed base may be too large for us to jettison the language that irks us. The boss may love a stack so much he can’t hear the screams coming from the cubicle farms. The cruel truth is that there may be no better options.' What languages have you shaking your fists at the console?

Submission + - Bitcoin exchange operatores arrested, BitInstant now down (bbc.co.uk)

Grantbridge writes: "The Department of Justice said Robert Faiella, known as BTCKing, and Charlie Shrem from BitInstant.com have both been charged with money laundering.
The authorities said the pair were engaged in a scheme to sell more than $1m (£603,000) in bitcoins to users of online drug marketplace the Silk Road." from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/tech...

It seems that BTCKing and Bitinstant have had people arrested over money laundering charges, and are now unavailable. If running an exchange counts as money laundering, then is the USA making itself a no-go area for bitcoin exchanges? Or will a reputable bank step up and run one complying with money laundering regulations.

Submission + - How Do You Move a City? (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: The town of Kiruna in Lapland, Sweden, is known for its Jukkasjårvi Ice Hotel and for hosting the recent Arctic Council summit. It also sits within the Arctic Circle, on one of the world’s richest deposits of iron ore. Now in danger of collapse due to extensive deep mining, the city center is to be relocated.

Submission + - The True Color of Ancient Sea Creatures (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Looking a bit like a dolphin, but with a long slim snout filled with pointy teeth, one species of ichthyosaur was practically invisible in the murky depths of Jurassic seas, thanks to dark pigmentation that covered its entire body. That’s one conclusion of a new study that provides an unprecedented peek at the coloration of sea creatures alive during or soon after the dinosaur era. The approach involves bombarding fossils with charged particles and then analyzing the particles that are knocked from the surface, which reveals remnants of ancient pigments. Dark pigmentation may have helped ichthyosaurs and other predators camouflage themselves in the murky depths while they hunted prey.

Submission + - Chang'e-3 lunar rover landing tomorrow at 13:40 UTC (planetary.org)

savuporo writes: The Chinese Chang'e-3 probe will be landing on the moon tomorrow, 13:40 UTC. CCTV is likely to carry the event life as they did for initial launch. According to technical overview of the mission scenario and instruments the landing will be fully autonomous with active landing hazard avoidance, which is the first time this has been attempted on any planetary landing. More real-time updates can be found on Twitter with ChangE3 hash tag and NASASpaceFlight forums live event section.

Submission + - Critics Reassess 'Starship Troopers' as a Misunderstood Masterpiece 2

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Calum Marsh writes in The Atlantic that when Paul Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers hit theaters 16 years ago today, American critics slammed it as a “crazed, lurid spectacle” featuring “raunchiness tailor-made for teen-age boys" and “a nonstop splatterfest so devoid of taste and logic that it makes even the most brainless summer blockbuster look intelligent.” But now the reputation of the movie based on Robert Heinlein's Hugo award winning novel is beginning to improve as critics begin to recognize the film as a critique of the military-industrial complex, the jingoism of American foreign policy, and a culture that privileges reactionary violence over sensitivity and reason. "Starship Troopers is satire, a ruthlessly funny and keenly self-aware sendup of right-wing militarism," writes Marsh. "The fact that it was and continues to be taken at face value speaks to the very vapidity the movie skewers." The movie has rightfully come to be appreciated by some as an unsung masterpiece. Coming in at number 20 on Slant Magazine’s list of the 100 best films of the 1990s last year, the site’s Phil Coldiron described it as “one of the greatest of all anti-imperialist films,” a parody of Hollywood form whose superficial “badness” is central to its critique. "That concept is stiob, which I'll crudely define as a form of parody requiring such a degree of over-identification with the subject being parodied that it becomes impossible to tell where the love for that subject ends and the parody begins," writes Coldiron. "If you’re prepared for the rigor and intensity of Verhoeven’s approach—you’ll get the joke Starship Troopers is telling," says Marsh. "And you’ll laugh."

Submission + - Lime: An Open Source Sublime Text Clone (github.com)

jones_supa writes: A clone of the popular Sublime Text text editor has been released under the 2-clause BSD license. As the author Fredrik Ehnbom announces the project:

I love the Sublime Text editor. I have created several plugins to make it even better. One thing that scares me though is that it is not open sourced and the pace of nightly releases have recently been anything but nightly, even now that version 3 is out in Beta. There was a period of about 6 months after the Sublime Text 2 “stable“ version was released where pretty much nothing at all was communicated to the users about what to expect in the future, nor was there much support offered in the forums. People including myself were wondering if the product was dead and I personally wondered what would happen to all the bugs, crashes and annoyances that still existed in ST2. This lack of communication is a dealbreaker to me and I decided that I will not spend any more money on that product because of it. As none of the other text editors I've tried come close to the love I had for Sublime Text, I decided I had to create my own. The frontend(s) are not ready to replace your favourite editor, but the backend itself I believe isn't too far away.

Submission + - Company to Balloon Tourists to the Edge of Space for $75,000 (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: If the thought of a rocket ride to space — or the $250,000 price tag to get there — leaves you feeling queasy, an Arizona firm thinks it has a gentler, less expensive alternative. World View, an offshoot of privately owned Paragon Space Development Corp., is developing a balloon-launched, near-space (30 kilometers) ride for $75,000 — less than one-third the current cost to fly on Virgin Galactic's suborbital SpaceShipTwo. “It really is very gentle. You can be up at altitude for hours, for days for research if you need to be... I think we have the opportunity to give a really, really incredible experience to people — and for a lot less than most of what’s out on the market right now,” project co-founder and Paragon president Jane Poynter told Discovery News.

Submission + - Experian sold social security numbers to ID Theft Service

realized writes: Experian — one of the three national US credit bureaus — reportedly sold SSNs through its subsidiary, Court Ventures, to the operators of SuperGet.info who then offered all of the information online for a price. The website would advertise having "99% to 100% of all USA" in their database on websites frequented by carders.

Hieu Minh Ngo, the website owner, has recently been charged with 15-count indictment filed under seal in November 2012, charging him with conspiracy to commit wire fraud, substantive wire fraud, conspiracy to commit identity fraud, substantive identity fraud, aggravated identity theft, conspiracy to commit access device fraud, and substantive access device fraud.

Submission + - Learning to Code: Are We Having Fun Yet? 1

theodp writes: Nate West has a nice essay on the importance of whimsy in learning to program. "It wasn’t until I was writing Ruby that I found learning to program to be fun," recalls West. "What’s funny is it really doesn’t take much effort to be more enjoyable than the C++ examples from earlier...just getting to write gets.chomp and puts over cout > made all the difference. Ruby examples kept me engaged just long enough that I could find Why’s Poignant Guide to Ruby." So, does the future of introductory computer programming books and MOOCs lie in professional, business-like presentations, or does a less-polished production with some genuine goofy enthusiasm help the programming medicine go down?

Submission + - World's largest OTEC power plant planned for China (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: Lockheed Martin has been getting its feet wet in the renewable energy game for some time. In the 1970s it helped build the world’s first successful floating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system that generated net power, and in 2009 it was awarded a contract to develop an OTEC pilot plant in Hawaii. That project has apparently been canceled but the company has now shifted its OTEC sights westward by teaming up with Hong Kong-based Reignwood Group to co-develop a 10 MW pilot plant that will be built off the coast of southern China.

Submission + - Teen stunned at portrayal as Mass. bombing suspect (bostonherald.com)

Okian Warrior writes: The 4chan crowd, poring over images of the Boston marathon, identified two dark-skinned and bag-carrying suspects (among others). This was then picked up by The New York Post, who ran the image on Thursday's front page with the headline "Feds seek these two pictured at Boston Marathon". And now, a completely innocent teen now finds himself scared to leave his home.
Science

Submission + - Forbes 2013 career list flamed by university professors (forbes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Forbes list of "least stressful jobs" for 2013 is headlined by... university professors. This comes at a time in which the academic community has been featured on controversies about 100-hour week work journeys, doctors live on food stamps, tenured staff is laid off large science institutions, and the National Science Foundation suffers severe budget cuts, besides the well known (and sometimes publicized) politics of publish or perish. The Forbes reporter has received abundant feedback and published a shy, foot-note "addendum"; however, their cited source, CareerCast (which does not map to any recognizable career journalist, but rather to a Sports writer), does not seem to have had the same luck. The comments of the Forbes reporter on the existence of a Summer break for graduates ("I am curious whether professors work that hard over the summer") are particularly noteworthy.
Government

Submission + - Scary Toothbrush prompts shutdown of world's busiest airport (ajc.com)

McGruber writes: The big buzz for travelers today is the story (http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/atlanta-airport-closed-by-toothbrush/nTmqK/) of how a scary toothbrush prompted the closure of Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport: "Airport officials told Channel 2 Action News that an electric toothbrush began vibrating inside a bag checked onto an AirTran flight, causing workers to alert airport officials to the strange noise." The terminal and the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) subway were both temporary closed "out of an abundance of caution".

ATL has been the world's busiest airport by passenger traffic since 1998, and by number of landings and take-offs since 2005.[

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