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Comment Yes you do (Score 1) 228

You're assuming the charge here for is a failed upgrade. The charge is for a failed forced upgrade. If Microsoft had informed users with a list of new features, what would happen in the upgrade process, and a disclaimer outlining the risks present in any upgrade, I think they would've been ok.

But they didn't do that. They did nearly everything they could to force the Win 10 upgrade down people's throats, including misclassifying it as a security update, constantly pestering people who had already said they didn't want the upgrade, and breaking long-established UI paradigms like clicking the X to dismiss a dialog, to make it the same as clicking OK. Once you inadvertently authorized the upgrade, the computer would often upgrade on its own overnight without user intervention. No information, no disclaimers. If that's how you're going to treat your users, then you deserve to be fully liable for all the problems your shenanigans cause.

OSS is fine because using it is completely voluntary. An OSS project might get into trouble if, say, Ubuntu forcibly upgraded pre-existing Ubuntu systems using sysv init to systemd. But no OSS project would be crazy enough to try that with pre-existing systems. The only reason Microsoft did it was because they knew software lock-in would prevent most users frustrated by their shenanigans from fleeing to a different OS.

Comment silent s (Score 1, Insightful) 213

I'm sure the "so called" security experts you deride would point out that the S in HTTPS is not simply encryption spelled in a funny way. Security != Encryption and the role of the certificate is Authentication not Encryption. If it doesn't authenticate anything then it is worthless, and the whole bloody point of a public CA IS to be the internet's watchdog or there is no point in trusting them.

Or do they feel that the only role of an adult is to buy liquor for children ?

Comment Most accidents have multiple causes (Score 3, Insightful) 217

Most people try to pin the blame for an accident on a single cause. Most liability laws are based on this same (erroneous) concept.

Airline accident investigations are really good at demonstrating how an entire chain of events led up to the accident. And that any single factor happening differently could've prevented the accident. e.g. The Concorde crash was caused by (1) debris on the runway from a faulty repair on a previous plane, (2) failure of the Concorde's tires when it struck the debris, (3) failure of the undercarriage to withstand tire debris striking it from a blowout at take-off speed, (4) the manufacturer not making any procedures or provisions to recover from a double engine failure on a single side because it was considered so unlikely. Any one of these things doesn't happen and the Concorde doesn't crash.

Safety systems layer multiple accident-avoidance measures on top of each other. This redundancy means that only when all of those measures fail is there an accident. Consequently, even if the self-driving car was not legally at fault, that it was involved in an accident still points to a possible problem. e.g. If I'm approaching an intersection and I have a green light, I don't just blindly pass through because the law says I have the right of way. I take a quick glance to the left and right to make sure nobody is going to run their red light, or that there aren't emergency vehicles approaching which might run the red light, or that there's nobody in the crosswalk parallel to me who might suddenly enter into my lane (cyclist falls over, dog or child runs out of crosswalk, etc).

So even if the autonomous car wasn't legally at fault, that's not the same thing as saying it did nothing wrong. There may still be lessons to learn, safety systems which were supposed to work but didn't, ways to improve the autonomous car to prevent similar accidents in the future.

Comment Re:Not a Republican defeat (Score 1) 499

I was listening to Ryan on the radio talking about not rejecting the good because it was not perfect and accepting compromise etc. If the voice had been slightly different and the timing a year ago I could easily have believed it was Obama saying those things.

For that matter, if the opportunity had been better to run against Hillary in the primary I could easily see us looking at president Trump the Democrat.

What I want to see more than anything else is a healthy working opposition, not just everyone switching hats between a "Party of no" and the party of "cmon, let's just work together to get it done", but rather two parties promoting, contrasting, and building support for their ideas, but as it is, the opposition are not rewarded for co-operation or punished for blatant obstructionism it seems.

Comment Re:Let's see if I have this right (Score 5, Insightful) 499

Contrary to what the pundits on the left like to believe, the GOP is not one monolithic voting bloc in fact if you explore voting history along party lines, you'll find it's the Democratic party which votes more as a bloc. (Sort by "votes with party" and it's mostly Democrats at the top.)

Half the GOP wants to replace Obamacare with Obamacare-lite, half wants to completely end government involvement in health care. That was the impasse. Ideally, the moderate Democrats and moderate Republicans would get together and come up with something, giving a middle finger to the hard left Democrats and the hard right Republicans. But the two parties are under the control of the hard left and hard right, and will ostracize any moderates who fail to toe their respective party line.

Comment more healthcare (Score 3, Interesting) 499

I think it depends on what's said on Fox in the morning. I don't think H1B reform is a hot button issue for its own sake, or for the sake of employers or visa holders, but if it can be co-mingled with outrage over someone who can be an easy target for blame and looks like they're getting a better deal than they deserve regardless of the facts then it will rise to be the next big thing. I doubt he's walked away from healthcare, there's plenty of rage left to be mined there.

Comment Re:If I had my way... (Score 5, Insightful) 221

If I had my way, you could patent whatever you like about the device. But the moment you sell the device to someone they can do whatever they damn well want with it. As with copyright, the only thing patent protection should prevent is me from distributing copies of the device without the patent holder's permission. If I want to fill the cartridge with oatmeal and put it in my printer, it should be my right to do so by the First Sale doctrine (aka the exhaustion rule mentioned in summary).

If the patent holder wishes to claim they still control the printer and cartridge, then they didn't sell it to me. They rented it to me. And like a landlord who is responsible for repairing things that break down in a rented apartment, they are responsible for fixing the printer if it breaks for as long as they claim they control the cartridge. i.e. If they claim the control the cartridge forever, then that is the same thing as saying the printer has a transferable lifetime warranty.

Comment Re:Wonder why (Score 2) 202

I've lived in a couple nice areas like that inside cities. I'm also in the 80th percentile income bracket.

What's housing in the city like for people in the 50th percentile income bracket? For the typical 50th percentile person. Not the one who got lucky and snagged a rent-controlled apartment whose previous 90 year old tenant died of a heart attack and they happened to know her grand-niece so heard about the apartment being available before it was advertised. Comparisons should be made based on averages, not on extremes.

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