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Submission + - BleachBit stifles investigation of Hillary Clinton

ahziem writes: The IT team for presidential candidate Hillary Clinton used the open source cleaning software BleachBit to wipe systems "so even God couldn’t read them," according to South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy on Fox News. His comments on the "drastic cyber-measure" were in response to the question of whether emails on her private Microsoft Exchange Server were simply about "yoga and wedding plans."

Perhaps Clinton's team used an open source application because, unlike proprietary applications, it can be audited, like for backdoors. In response to the Edward Snowden leaks in 2013, privacy expert Bruce Schneier advised, "Closed-source software is easier for the NSA to backdoor than open-source software," in an article in which he stated he also uses BleachBit. Ironically, Schneier was writing to a non-governmental audience.

Comment Re:chain of custody (Score 1) 66

Apple may have to come very clean about how this works or it may not hold up in court.

I doubt it is intended to hold up in court. More likely the idea is to provide the phone's owner (perhaps in conjunction with the police) with information about who took their phone, so that they then know where to look to find more solid evidence.

Comment Re:Numbers not adding up... (Score 1) 148

The percentages are percentages of the 58% of failing devices. Of the devices that failed, 29% were iPhone 6, 23% were the 6s, and 14% were the 6s Plus. Add those together and we're missing the final 33% of failed devices but it's safe to assume that a random collection of 6 Plus, 5SE, 5s, 5c, etc. make up that final 33% of the 58%.

So let me see if I understand this epic math fail correctly. Given n devices, there were k devices that were brought in for repair. Of those k devices, 58% were iOS devices, and of those 58%, 29% were iPhone 6 devices.

Which tells us absolutely nothing about the actual failure rate without knowing how the makeup of those n devices relates to the makeup of those k devices. It tells us nothing about the actual failure rate without knowing what percentage of each model within k were junked and replaced without notifying the service center in question. It tells us nothing about whether the Android and iOS users have similar levels of self-sufficiency in terms of figuring out how to solve their own problems. And there are probably at least three or four other fairly fundamental errors that make this data essentially pure noise.

Arguments over minor methodology points, such as whether to count specific types of failures in the reliability numbers, are basically moot, because the "data" is purely anecdotal and is not mathematically related to the actual rate of failure to begin with. This isn't statistically any better than saying, "Of my friends, more people have had problems with Android phones than iOS phones" or vice versa. If you know nothing about whether the sample population has similar distribution to the general population and you know nothing about whether the data is even an accurate measurement of the sample population itself, then these numbers are quite literally no better than a random number generator with a Gaussian distribution. You might as well arrive at the results by throwing darts at a dartboard. It will be approximately as meaningful.

Am I missing something?

Trust me, if even 1% of iPhone hardware failed during its warranty period, heads would roll, much less 58%.

Comment Numbers not adding up... (Score 2) 148

A 58% failure rate? In one quarter...that's three months? Or is it that the article is as of Q2 2016...in which case I'd want to know the overall period covered, and the definition of "failure." If it's a 3-year period and replacing the phone with an upgrade is classifying it as having "failed," then I could see how this rate would be possible...but out of purely anecdotal insight from the fact that nearly everyone I know (and everyone I work with) has an iPhone, I don't see how this can be right.

But what's REALLY odd is that 58% is an average of the various IOS devices, right? So how is it possible for the overall rate to be 58% if the device with the highest rate of failure only had a rate of 29%? How do you average 29 with any combination of lower numbers to get 58?

Straight from the website from which you can download the actual report (linked in the TFA):

Out of the 58 percent of iOS devices that failed, iPhone 6 had the highest failure rate (29 percent), followed by iPhone 6S (23 percent) and iPhone 6S Plus (14 percent).

When I try to solve for 58% using those numbers, Excel just gives me the Skeptical African Kid Meme.

Comment Re:I read the version with the photos (Score 1) 4

Yes, it was. I had the maid show me how to work the coffeemaker later. I'd have known if I'd bothered to read the coffee packet.

Some of the blur may have been because I was so shaky after hiking outside with all those books and falling down. That last photo is bad because there wasn't much light,

Comment Re:I read the version with the photos (Score 1) 4

The blurry pics are from Patty's new Samsung. I reduced resolution as well, because when I run out of hosting space at mcgrewbooks.com where the photos actually are (they won't fit in the mcgrew.info's 10 megs) it will cost a lot more. The Sith is cropped way down, he was across the room.

That first picture, the worldcon logo, came from Google. The covers to "Random Scribblings" are GIMPed photos I took with the same phone I took to Worldcon.

I would have probably made a fool of myself if I'd gone to the first Midamericon in 1969 in St. Louis, but I was seventeen.

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