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Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 665

You should be aware that you don't need to be an engineer to perform most work. The exceptions where you do need to be an engineer are things like designing industrial machinery and bridges.

Or medium- to high-voltage electrical equipment, which is what anyone claiming to be an "electrical engineer" is asserting that they're competent to do.

Really, it should be required for anything where poor design can negatively impact the public. At a minimum, that should include safety-critical things like the software running on medical equipment, but I would argue that the scope should be much broader, e.g. by holding IoT device makers accountable for their product's lack of security.

Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 665

So because of falling bridges, you can't solder your own radio?

That's a strawman argument. You can solder your own radio all you want, obviously.

What you can't do is offer your radio-building services to the public, claiming that your expertise as an engineer means they can trust that the radios you create will be (a) electrically safe (which is an issue once you're talking about stuff with more transmission power than a cellphone or walkie-talkie) and (b) comply with FCC regulations.

such for specific projects rather than for extremely vague words such as "engineer" in a broad sweep?

Except for low-voltage electronics (that have only become prevalent relatively recently -- i.e., in the least few decades), the vast majority of things engineers do are safety-critical! Claiming to be an "electrical engineer" is claiming to be competent to design things like high-voltage electrical substations, or (if you want consumer product examples) at least cathode ray tubes, microwave ovens or switching power supplies -- i.e., stuff that actually can kill people if someone screws up the design. It's not just about insignificant shit like integrated circuits and PCBs.

Comment Re: Correcting myself (Score 1) 665

and saying "I'm am engineer" to lend his letter more weoght.

AND THAT'S THE PROBLEM!

If you haven't proven yourself to be competent (e.g. by earning the license), you don't deserve to have more weight lent to your opinion. Claiming to be something you're not in order to gain advantage is fraud.

Comment Re:I like functions... (Score 1) 408

It's quite a bit more than that, at least if you're talking about pure functional programming. You also have to get rid of most all of your old notions of flow control. Imperative programming is about defining sequences of steps, some of which are conditional. Functional programming is all done with nested transformations; there are no sequential steps, there are no branches, there is no iteration.

If you think about it, those are inevitable consequences of the constraints I mentioned. However, it's good that you highlighted them.

If this sounds freakish and impossible to someone raised on imperative programming paradigms... yes, it is. Functional programming requires thinking in an entirely new way.

Yep, both recursion and constructs like map/filter are incredibly useful (even in procedural/OO languages) once you get the hang of them.

Comment Re:I like functions... (Score 3, Insightful) 408

Yes, it means your functions aren't allowed to have side effects (i.e., all parameters are passed by value and the only result is the value returned to the caller).

Personally, I like it because it's a good way to manage complexity -- kind of like the encapsulation of object-oriented programming, except applied to the verbs instead of the nouns.

Comment Re:No brainer (Score 4, Insightful) 173

The other thing which bugs me is the white washing of old news articles how often that trick gets pulled, I might personally remember an event but find the contemporary records are missing that happens a lot especially in Politics when a past stance becomes embarrassing and then you get told black was white...

This is the single most important reason there could ever be!

Comment Re:Do you code? (Score 1, Interesting) 388

Also you have interface complexity. Adding these features requires some way to use the features, possibly including configuration options, menu items, hotkeys and so on. Prior to the Ribbon, Microsoft tried to fix this in Word by hiding all the menu items you had not used yet, so you'd never know those features were there to be used. My boss constantly asks me to remove menu items and "simplify" but he never has any answers on where he thinks users should go to access those features if they're no longer in the menu. Relevant Dilbert.

Google

In The First Months of Trump Era, Facebook And Apple Spent More On Lobbying Than They Ever Have (buzzfeed.com) 54

An anonymous reader shares a report: According to federal lobbying disclosures filed Thursday, Facebook and Apple set their all-time record high for spending in a single quarter. Facebook spent $3.2 million lobbying the federal government in the first months of the Trump era. During the same period last year, Facebook spent $2.8 million (about 15% less). The company lobbied both chambers of Congress, the White House, and six federal agencies on issues including high-tech worker visas, network neutrality, internet privacy, encryption, and international taxation. Facebook was the 12th-highest spender out of any company and second-highest in tech. [...] Apple spent $1.4 million, which is just $50,000 more than during the final months of the Obama presidency, when it set its previous record, but the most it has ever spent in a single quarter. Apple lobbied on issues including government requests for data, the regulation of mobile health apps, and self-driving cars. Google, once again, outspent every other technology company. It was 10th overall, tallying $3.5 million.

Submission + - SPAM: Cycling to Work Can Cut Cancer and Heart Disease

randomErr writes: Want to live longer, reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease? Then cycle to work, say scientists. The five-year study of 250,000 UK commuters also showed walking had some benefits over sitting on public transport or taking the car. Published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) today, the University of Glasgow study compared those who had an ‘active’ commute with those who were mostly stationary on their journey to work. However, the effect was still there even after adjusting the statistics to remove the effects of other potential explanations like smoking, diet or how heavy people are.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Operation Gotham Shield: U.S. Gov't To "Simulate Nuke Blast Over Manhattan" (infowars.com)

schwit1 writes: It is a tabletop, joint agency exercise during April 24-26th, involving FEMA, Homeland Security and a myriad of law enforcement and military agencies. WMD, chemical and biological units will all be on hand as a response is tested for a “simulated” nuclear detonation over the United States’ foremost urban center, in the iconic and densely populated island of Manhattan and nearby shores of New Jersey.

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