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Comment Re: yes, if the ipad can have a 2048x1536 screen.. (Score 1) 591

That's not really true anymore. Just about every app I run across is Retina-enabled at this point, even Microsoft Office 2011. And for most legacy apps you can trick them into displaying at least the fonts in Retina resolution by editing the Contents/Info.plist file, adding a NSHighResolutionCapable tag towards the bottom. http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20120731145025768

Submission + - Minnesota Supreme Court rejects DUI challenges based on buggy software (startribune.com)

bzzfzz writes: In a case with parallels to the Diebold Voting Machine fiasco, the Minnesota Supreme Court upheld the reliability of the Intoxilyzer 5000EN breath testing machine on a narrow 4-3 vote. Source code analysis during the six-year legal battle revealed a number of bugs that could potentially affect test results. Several thousand DUI cases that were pending the results of this appeal will now proceed.

The ruling is one in a series of DUI-related court victories for police and prosecutors. Other recent cases upheld a conviction of a person with no evidence that the vehicle had been driven and convictions based solely on urine samples that may only show impairment hours before driving.

The Intoxilyzer 5000EN is now considered obsolete, and replacement devices are being rolled out with the last jurisdictions in the state scheduled to retire their 5000ENs by the end of the year.


Submission + - Apple Makes North Carolina Data Centre 100 Percent Renewable (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Stung by continued criticism from Greenpeace and protests at Apple's headquartersover its use of electricity from non-renewable sources, Apple has promised that its data centre in Maiden, North Carolina will use 100 percent renewable electricity,, 60 percent of it generated by Apple itself. The update is possible because it is building a second giant solar array, and because its data centre only needs 20MW at full capacity, instead of the 100MW which Greenpeace had estimated."

Submission + - HP to cut 30,000 jobs (nytimes.com)

Axolotl_Rose writes: Hewlett-Packard’s chief executive, Meg Whitman, plans to cut 30,000 or more jobs next week, according to officials familiar with the plan. Her goal, they said Thursday, is to spend the money she saves on increasing the efficiency of the company’s sales force and on creating new products.... ...China, which is one of H.P.’s highest growth areas, will probably be spared, as will its research and development efforts.

Submission + - Google's Grand Android Plan: Finally, It All Makes Sense (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "Get ready, gang: Android may be on the brink of its biggest change yet — a shift that could redefine the platform and send waves through the entire mobile market, writes JR Raphael. Signs of something big have been brewing in AndroidLand for some time now: First, we've had the increasingly loud buzz about Google's top-secret mission to build an inexpensive Nexus-like tablet. Then, last month, Google opened the door to selling unlocked Nexus devices directly to consumers, eliminating the need for carrier meddling and contract commitments. Now, at long last, we're getting a glimpse at what's likely the final piece of the puzzle. Google is getting ready to expand its Nexus program, a report from The Wall Street Journal says, and will soon offer a "portfolio" of Nexus-like flagship devices. Instead of selecting a single manufacturer to make each Nexus model, as it's done in the past, El Goog will reportedly work with up to five different manufacturers in order to offer a wide selection of stock devices — both phones and tablets. But wait: There's more. According to the Journal, Google will sell all those Nexus devices directly to users through its new Google Play Device Store. It'll supposedly offer direct sales to users in the U.S., Europe, and Asia; it might even partner up with some retailers to expand the program. This, my friends, is huge."

Submission + - Gene Therapy Extends Mouse Lifespan (sciencedaily.com)

Grond writes: "'Researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre have demonstrated that the mouse lifespan can be extended by the application in adult life of a single treatment acting directly on the animal's genes. Mice treated at the age of one lived longer by 24% on average, and those treated at the age of two, by 13%. The therapy, furthermore, produced an appreciable improvement in the animals' health, delaying the onset of age-related diseases — like osteoporosis and insulin resistance — and achieving improved readings on aging indicators like neuromuscular coordination.' Notably, the therapy did not cause an increase in the incidence of cancer."

Submission + - An 8,000 Ton Giant Made the Jet Age Possible

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Tim Heffernan writes that when "The Fifty," as it’s known in company circles, broke down three years ago, there was talk of retiring it for good. Instead, Alcoa decided to overhaul their 50,000-ton, 6-story high forging press, now scheduled to resume service early this year. "What sets the Fifty apart is its extraordinary scale," writes Heffernan. "Its 14 major structural components, cast in ductile iron, weigh as much as 250 tons each; those yard-thick steel bolts are also 78 feet long; all told, the machine weighs 16 million pounds, and when activated its eight main hydraulic cylinders deliver up to 50,000 tons of compressive force." The Fifty could bench-press the battleship Iowa, with 860 tons to spare but it's the Fifty's amazing precision—its tolerances are measured in thousandths of an inch—that gives it such far-reaching utility. Every manned US military aircraft now flying uses parts forged by the Fifty as does every commercial aircraft made by Airbus and Boeing making the Jet Age possible. "On a plane, a pound of weight saved is a pound of thrust gained—or a pound of lift, or a pound of cargo," writes Heffernan. "Without the ultra-strong, ultra-light components that only forging can produce, they’d all be pushing much smaller envelopes." The now-forgotten Heavy Press Program (PDF), inaugurated in 1950 and completed in 1957, resulted in four presses (including the Fifty) and six extruders—giant toothpaste tubes squeezing out long, complex metal structures such as wing ribs and missile bodies. "Today, America lacks the ability to make anything like the Heavy Press Program machines," concludes Heffernan adding that "The Fifty" will be supplying bulkheads through 2034 for the Joint Strike Fighter. "Big machines are the product of big visions, and they make big visions real. How about a Heavy Fusion Program?""

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Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. - Voltaire