Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Toys

Building the Enterprise D Out of LEGOs. 295

CleverNickName writes "A self-proclaimed "dork" has built one of the best models of Enterprise D I have ever seen (and I think I speak with some authority)...entirely out of LEGOs. I can see my house from here!"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Building the Enterprise D Out of LEGOs.

Comments Filter:
  • by skroz ( 7870 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:30AM (#4782722) Homepage
    Wow. Thanks to Fark.com, I've gone from 15 page views (mostly mine) to almost 5,000 in about 24 hours. Very nice to have so many compliments - it'll be the first and last fan mail I ever get, probably. :) Check for some additional notes and answers at the bottom of the page.
    He has no idea what a slashdotting is, apparently.
  • Slick (Score:2, Funny)

    by altaic ( 559466 )
    How many hours did this guy put in? Scope out those diagrams! Most archetects don't use that much detail when designing a building. Just goes to say that dorks have too much time on their hands.
    • Re:Slick (Score:5, Funny)

      by skroz ( 7870 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:33AM (#4782735) Homepage
      Most archetects don't use that much detail when designing a building
      Please tell me you're not an architect.
      • Re:Slick (Score:2, Interesting)

        by altaic ( 559466 )
        I have friends who are, which probably explains how my perspective is skewed. ;) But seriously, speaking from experience, geeks have too much time on their hands.
      • Re:Slick (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Desert Raven ( 52125 )
        Most archetects don't use that much detail when designing a building
        Please tell me you're not an architect.

        Eh, I've worked with architects. Any details they add aren't usually worth the graphite they were drawn with. Architects don't actually know how to build things, and thus rarely have any concept of appropriate materials/dimensions/cost, etc. All they care about is how it looks.

        It's the engineers/builders who have to transform the architect's crack-pipe hallucination into something that obeys the laws of physics, human ergonomics, and modern economics.

        The guy who built this was not an architect, he's an engineer.
      • Most archetects don't use that much detail when designing a building

        Please tell me you're not an architect.


        No, no, he must have been talking about archetects, which could be construed as 'model builders', if one takes arche- as in archetype [reference.com] and -tect, as in, well, architect [reference.com].

        Of course, I just might be overestimating his cleverness. ;)

  • when there are lots of kits and plans to choose from http://www.starshipmodeler.com/trek/trekship.htm [starshipmodeler.com]
    • by Yebyen ( 59663 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:38AM (#4782752) Homepage
      The only possible answer is that if you have to ask, you couldn't possibly understand.
    • by Anonvmous Coward ( 589068 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:03AM (#4782939)
      "when there are lots of kits and plans to choose from http://www.starshipmodeler.com/trek/trekship.htm [starshipmodeler.com]"

      Yeah I don't understand Lego people either. Why they build anything besides what's already planned out for them is beyond me.
      • Why bother building a Linux distro from scratch?
      • by Inferno ( 91359 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @05:06AM (#4783043) Journal

        Why do it?

        First off, a little background: I built (played?) with legos well into my teen years. When I moved on to computers I passed all my Legos on to my little brother, who added them to his already large collection. He continues to build today (at age 22), but they are much more complex models involving the Mindstorms robot system. He's really delved into the programming on those, and has 2 mindstorm "brains" that he uses. This last fall, he got an award at the Oregon State Fair for his "Dinner Plate Transporter".

        Anyway, the reason that I built was because I wanted to create my own toys. My brother and I would setup environments consisting of Legos, pillows, blankets, chairs, tables, etc etc, then build vehicles and buildings to populate those environments. Then we would play. :) The beauty of it was the flexibility of the Lego blocks. If something wasn't working out or didn't look right, we could tear it down and rebuild it.

        Those were the days. :)

        • Mindstorms are OK (Score:3, Interesting)

          by mangu ( 126918 )
          When you create a working prototype of something it may be the first set in an important evolution. But I can't understand how so many people seem to be intent on bulding models from legos. And I can't understand this fascination with Star Trek.


          I have a collection of science fiction that started with my dad in the 1940's and has been growing ever since. But that's Science Fiction, with capital SF, not sci-fi or space opera. It's the kind of stories that make you think "hey, that had never occurred to me, what if it happens that way?". On the other hand, the only thing that comes into anyone's mind when seeing Star Trek, or any other space opera, is "wow".

        • The beauty of it was the flexibility of the Lego blocks. If something wasn't working out or didn't look right, we could tear it down and rebuild it.

          Here's an interesting thought: Replace "LEGO blocks" with "open source software" and read the sentence again.

          Might be interesting to do a statistical analysis on how many avid LEGO builders/collectors became code hackers and programmers later in life (put me down as one of those)

      • "Yeah I don't understand Lego people either. Why they build anything besides what's already planned out for them is beyond me."

        It's the same mentality of the X-Box Linux Project.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:33AM (#4782733)
    I'm a classically trained geek-boy who has only enjoyed the company of women by the sheer grace of God.
    ... birth does not count.
  • Features (Score:4, Funny)

    by Bimkins ( 242641 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:33AM (#4782734)
    "The model features accidental saucer-separation capability, as I've found out more than once."

    Translation: I dropped it. It broke.
    • by saskboy ( 600063 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:32AM (#4782880) Homepage Journal
      Well I'm glad I didn't post what I was going to and be redundant and all. We picked the exact same quote out of the article.

      Except I can add:
      "..more than once."

      Translation: I'm a clutz, what do you expect from a dork anyhow? ;-)
    • Re:Features (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Dylan_t_p ( 630258 )
      other funny things from the faq Okay, I didn't mean to make my geekness such an issue, though it is kind of funny. Don't worry, I do leave the house, and I do many, many things besides Lego. like watch star trek, go to star trek conventions, play with my star trek action figure...you get my point No I don't need help finding a date. Yes, cute girls may still e-mail me, though I will surely question your attraction to a 24-year-old who plays with Legos. the real question here won't be why are you atracted to me but are you really a woman :) but hey I'm a geek too and to be hounest it's a pretty cool ship I'd never do anything like it but thats just becuase it would mean I'd have to leave my monitor
  • by Nefrayu ( 601593 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:38AM (#4782751) Homepage
    To bold lego where no one has gone before!
  • pfft (Score:5, Funny)

    by l33t-gu3lph1t3 ( 567059 ) <arch_angel16@@@hotmail...com> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:38AM (#4782753) Homepage
    I was admiring it until I saw at the bottom of the page: "created using a mac"

    Now I just sit back and wonder: Wow...Macs are good! I'm gonna get myself a duallie G4 and see if it can make me a Borg Cube!
  • by Tsar ( 536185 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:38AM (#4782754) Homepage Journal
    Before any rabid Trekkers reading this story decide to email him, let me point out that he's already been informed of this: "Within hours of posting, someone named Medic e-mailed me with the dimensions: 'Enterprise-D is a Galaxy Class Starship, which are supposed to be 2,103 feet long by 1,542 wide by 476 tall.' Which means, ratio-wise, my model is a little taller than it should be. I think I can live with that."

    Bet it's the tallest one in four counties, though!
    • Those dimensions are a little off. The actual dimensions are listed on Page 20 of the Technical Manual. It is 61110 cm long, 55974 cm in diameter (saucer section only), and 11707 cm from the top of the saucer to the furthermost rear of the primary hull. (I can't find dimensions for the parts lower than that...) 61110 cm is almost 2005 feet in length, not 2103 feet. (but now I'm quibbling.)
  • He has every life pod on the thing, but i do beleive he missed the damn captains yacht! Thats the ovoid thing in the center of the underside of every saucer. More than a shuttle, not quite a runabout. I dont think its ever been used in an episode though.
    • I'm sure as soon as Lego creates the "Captain's Yacht" peice, he'll attach it. For now you'll just have to wait in anticipation ;-)
  • dont get me wrong, thats quite the project there.

    However, he has a picture labeled 'the troublesome deflector dish' which he just used some brown and white blocks instead of the gray. Its been a while since I played with legos, but weren't there some parabolic dish type things that would have made a reasonable deflector shield?
    • However, he has a picture labeled 'the troublesome deflector dish' which he just used some brown and white blocks instead of the gray. Its been a while since I played with legos, but weren't there some parabolic dish type things that would have made a reasonable deflector shield?

      See, the thing is, if you made it out of those parabolic dish-thingies, it'd be really, really tough to modify the deflector dish to interface with the sensor array, and emit a neutrino pulse into the heart of the anomaly.
      • by lhbtubajon ( 469284 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:08AM (#4782825)
        I think you mean a tachyon pulse, but we'll let that slide since, you know, at the time you were off with the Traveler and all.
      • See, the thing is, if you made it out of those parabolic dish-thingies, it'd be really, really tough to modify the deflector dish to interface with the sensor array, and emit a neutrino pulse into the heart of the anomaly.

        IIRC, whenever the brave crew of the Enterprise modifies the deflector dish to interface with the sensor array and emits a neutrino pulse into the heart the anomaly, it never works as intended.

        Name one episode where using the deflector dish actually helped the crisis. I can't recall any.

        • by Tsar ( 536185 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:02AM (#4782935) Homepage Journal
          Name one episode where using the deflector dish actually helped the crisis. I can't recall any.

          You've obviously forgotten the episode "Protocols." Data modified the deflector dish to support Subspace TCP/IP (RFC #31,415,926) and ran an IRC server through it until Picard booted him off and changed the root password.

          The best moment was during the final court martial scene, when Riker uttered the immortal words, "Data wants to be free."
      • by Tsar ( 536185 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:19AM (#4782969) Homepage Journal
        See, the thing is, if you made it out of those parabolic dish-thingies, it'd be really, really tough to modify the deflector dish to interface with the sensor array, and emit a neutrino pulse into the heart of the anomaly.

        This is only a short-term benefit--the new Enterprise version (NCC-1701F) will be DRM-enabled, and such modifications will be prohibited under the DMCA. Resistance is futile, so do what you can with impedance.

        In another vein, I seem to recall that Marina Sirtis wore a reproduction of the Heart of the Anomaly (Le Coeur de l'Anomalie) to last year's Oscars, and it looked quite tachyon her.
      • You can use the parabolic dishes, but you have to compensate for a weakened structural integrity forcefield.

        If you just stayed in Starfleet Academy another year they would have taught you about the virtues of model airplace glue.

      • by Sacarino ( 619753 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @08:21AM (#4783340) Homepage
        See, the thing is, if you made it out of those parabolic dish-thingies, it'd be really, really tough to modify the deflector dish to interface with the sensor array, and emit a neutrino pulse into the heart of the anomaly.

        Point of order, Mr Weaton.

        You are officially cheating, using your knowledge of technobabble to gain karma.

        That's dirty pool in my book, insider.
  • One would think that CleverNickName has seen enough Star Trek items like this. Kind of surprising he'd be out looking for this stuff.

    On a related note, the orginal models - are there any still around (that haven't been blown up). IIRC the models used for TNG were 6 feet long (I could be way off).
    • Re:The submitter.... (Score:2, Interesting)

      by devmike ( 581881 )
      Interesting sidebar: After the production of Generations, the 6' model of the Enterprise D was lost.

      Archivists all over paramount were running screaming when they couldn't find it anywhere.

      more than a year later, it shows up in some back office reception area in horrible condition...all dinged up, holes drilled into it for display hanging, nacelles busted, and several years worth of grease layers.

      explanation: 'someone' loaned it out to a local restaurant for display and it never really got returned. It is now safely sequestered in the giant room of boxes you see at the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark.
  • by Cyno01 ( 573917 ) <Cyno01@hotmail.com> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:55AM (#4782796) Homepage
    Inspired by this i just created a lego Borg Cube. Even simpler than these [lego.com].
  • As recently as 50 years ago, most humans on this planet were mainly concerned with finding enough food on a daily basis to stay alive.

    In today's society, it's only slightly unusual to report on an individual who apparently has enough free time to obsessivbely recreate a fictional spacecraft in exacting detail with intentionally poor tools.

    The screwed up thing is, the majority of people in the world are STILL mainly concerned with finding enough food on a daily basis to stay alive.

    I'm not trying to pull a guilt/ego/trippy trip on anyone; it's just odd to think that some of us are lucky enough to have to go out of our way to waste time.

    • by Tsar ( 536185 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:15AM (#4782833) Homepage Journal
      Actually, people have been wasting time since prehistory. What purpose was served by the cave paintings at Lascaux [culture.fr]? I'd assume that those folk were generally preoccupied with the question of continued survival.

      Look at it this way--any time spent creating the spacecraft was not spent in procreation, though that may not have been entirely due to a proactive decision on his part. Consider the long-term resource savings!
    • So what?

      Why should we feel guilty because we are simply better than most everyone else at making a living for ourselves?

      I feel sorry for the children in places where they don't have the benefit of making a good life for themselves, but beyond that, sorry. I don't care.

      The adage that states, "Give a man a fish, and he will eat for a day, but teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime." holds true.

      We earn our daily bread and more. That we have spare time to do things other than looking for food is the result of many generations working harder than the one before so the one following will have a better standard of life.
    • Boll, and further, ocks.

      The majority of humans on earth can find enough food quite easily. The exceptions are visible and pitiful, but they are exceptions.

      The problem (depending on your point of view) is that for many of them there's little point in doing more work than is necessary to eat, because they don't have access to markets that provide the juicy consumer goods or expensive treat-the-symptoms pharmaceticals that we're lucky enough to have access to.

      In other words, if you take a Yanomami and her 4 hour work / 20 hour leisure day in the rainforest, and transplant her to the city then she has to work 10 or 12 hours a day to pay for her apartment and refridgerator and save up for a TV. I'm not saying that's inherently bad, just that you shouldn't confuse lack of possessions with being on the verge of starvation.

  • The 'Slashdot' has fired a plasma charge at the port nacelle! The feedback pulse has overloaded the antimatter injectors! We've got to jettison the core!

    (Data, On the Bridge)
    Captain, I believe if we fire a controlled burst of tachyon radiation at the bridge of the 'Slashdot', Cmdr Taco will forget that he has attacked us. That should give us enough time to reroute the power from the impulse engines to the warp core containment field. If I can run a holodeck carrier beam with the tachyon radiation, I believe I can create a 'virtual wormhole', and give us an hour before Cmdr Taco will repost this story. I mean, uh, attack us again.

    (Captain)
    Make it so. (To engineering) Jordi, you have an hour. Number One, in my ready room.

    (Number One)
    Someone turn off that damn alarm!

  • by USC-MBA ( 629057 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:00AM (#4782806) Homepage
    In exactly one location - the warp nacelle supports - I was bound to break some sort of unwritten moral code: I painted them gray from their original white, and glued them to their supports. ... and well, the nacelles were far too heavy to hold onto the ship's body by themselves. A liberal application of ABS plastic cement helped nicely

    Really, now, does this model truly qualify as an authentic Lego creation? Sure, his deviations seem minor, but it's a slippery slope friends.

    Where does it end. Is it acceptable to glue Lego bricks alongside one another to achieve the desired effect? Is it acceptable to airbrush cool color schemes on a model when the colored brick motif just isn't cutting it? What about incorporating non-lego pieces like balsa wood or erector set parts?

    I'm sorry, but as far as I'm concerned, this should be categorized more as just another plastic model kit of the Enterprise than a true Lego creation. Better luck next time.

    • Would saliva be in violation, everyone remembers that slobber encrusted legos were impossible to pull apart without hot water and a better knife or, your teeth
    • by The Good Reverend ( 84440 ) <michael@noSpAm.michris.com> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:15AM (#4782960) Journal
      FYI, almsot all "Grand" lego creations (homegrown and the 'pro' creations at the Legoland parks) use glue in their construction. The blocks themselves just don't provide enough support to hold a large model together.

      Painting is a different story - if there were "standards" in lego model building, painting would usually be against the rules. Though in reality, is it really much different than buying 4000 2x3 flat bricks for a project? It's not like you had them laying around.

      I'm sorry, but as far as I'm concerned, this should be categorized more as just another plastic model kit of the Enterprise than a true Lego creation.

      I'm going to have to disagree with you there - he not only built it, he designed the plans, researched the specs and size, and gathered the parts. As in depth as any boxed model is, all the work (besides putting it together) is already done for you. This Enterprise really is a neat accomplishment.
      • FYI, almsot all "Grand" lego creations (homegrown and the 'pro' creations at the Legoland parks) use glue in their construction. The blocks themselves just don't provide enough support to hold a large model together.

        In some models that's the reason (expecially large structures that are mostly shell with no interior details, such as replications of skyscapers). In other cases, the glue is used so the model will stand up to being moved from place to place, and so that it can withstand the elements or abuse by tourists, depending on where it is set up.

        Using glue to hold parts together is not considered to be "cheating" in constructing a model if you're simply gluing them together in the same positions that they would normally go together without the glue.

        As an aside, what consistently amazes me about LEGO products these days is quality. The parts are molded to a very high degree of accuracy to insure they will fit together, and the colors used in today's LEGO plastics take a very, very long time to fade. And in all the years that I have been collecting them, I have never had a set with a missing piece. I've had some with extra pieces, but never missing.

        The only problem I have with LEGO sets today is that they're damned expensive. It's quality, all right, but you definitely pay for it.

    • by jesterzog ( 189797 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:18AM (#4782965) Homepage Journal

      Is it acceptable to glue Lego bricks alongside one another to achieve the desired effect?

      Most lego doesn't have to stand up to the destructive forces created by extreme acceleration of a disproportionate and brittle design. Just think of this as the lego version of a conveniently available structural integrity field that redefines previously understood boundaries.

    • Excuse me, but does the molding of a piece of plastic and the addition of four buds of legos count against authenticity?

      Look at the X-wing lego kits or the "Quidditch Practice" kits on the Lego website... I think we've gone beyond the days of yore and the rules of lego. When shapes become difficult and are molded out of convenience, that's when the rules went out the window (MS claims to the name aside).

      I was pretty happy the day long ago when I got something other than a rectangular white, blue, red, or yellow piece. Now there's quidditch rings... I think that paint and glue are more than acceptable here. At least he didn't just mold an enterprise out of plastic with lego buds on it...
    • I'm not sure why he used glue either. He should have just increased power to the Structural Integrity Field.
  • Lego is a wonderful toy to develop spatial orientation and projection. It is perfect to develop the kind of intelligence needed to navigate in three dimensions by projecting the spatial relationships on a two dimensional plane.

    It also is a good learning tool to develop volumetric relationship (in an architectural sense).

    What I just don't understand is people trying to make it do something it's not made for: duplicating the volumetry and appearance of arbitrarly-shaped objects.

    Why don't you use clay or plaster? They are shapable to a great degree of likeness, far more than what you'll be able to achieve with legos.

    • Digital vs. Analogue (Score:4, Interesting)

      by czth ( 454384 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:39AM (#4782889) Homepage
      It's the digital-vs-analogue issue. It's a lot simpler to model something with discrete blocks when you are able to measure in discrete units, and also easier to repeat, make symmetric, transfer and encode, etc.

      But as you say, the price you pay is not being able to shape so minutely or copy precisely, i.e., you have to live with a square wave approximation of the real thing. It's all about tradeoffs. Artsies use analogue media, techies use digital :).

      czth

  • From his webpage
    "One at a time, I downloaded the deck plans from the Web, resized them in Photoshop, and printed them out onto graph paper."

    With 42 decks, this is no small amount of time. Wonder what I could do if I stopped reading slash dot so much?
  • by Anonvmous Coward ( 589068 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:10AM (#4782829)
    ...but I'd revise the bump mapping a bit.
  • This is Definitly news for nerds. Not so sure on the stuff that matters bit though =)

    Of course Taco does punctuate each so I guess it can be an either/or deal.
  • Millennium Falcon (Score:4, Informative)

    by Gogo Dodo ( 129808 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @03:43AM (#4782896)
    The coolest movie-to-Lego-model that I've seen is this Millennium Falcon [archive.org] (had to use Internet Wayback Machine as the original site's pictures are down).
  • I have yet to see something I have wanted for years. I want Legos on my PC. Basically, it needs to be very EASY just like Legos. Second, it has to be full rotational 3d. Third, every peice lego has ever made needs to exist and work right, including the gimick peices as I always called them (Magnets) etc. Also, all the ground peices so I could lay out a city, or base or whatever is needed. I always wanted the big train from the late 80s. If all the sets were loaded in, that would rock my world too! (ie, I could quickly load a prebuilt set model from my childhood and quickly look at it in and out and deconstruct it like I did IRL))

    I dont need things like facial animations and plot. Also, fun things to add would be stress testing. Oh, almost forgot. I have to be able to put some peices on in almost strange ways. I did that a lot and I always thought that was part of the sheer genuis that is Lego. Oh, if this has not been done and someone gets the idea to do this then consider it started and GPL'd, but lets try to get official Lego support. I dont want it to be "Supar Bloqs!" or some dumb shit.
  • ...to find out if he actually gets a date out of this!
  • Now we get to start another debate over the proper way to say "LEGOs".
  • by jamesjw ( 213986 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:06AM (#4782945) Homepage

    The small print "Model not capable of warp drive travel"

    But one things for sure, it'd probably survive a dense popcorn armada..

  • by samrolken ( 246301 ) <samrolken AT gmail DOT com> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @07:07AM (#4783270)
    For those of us who aren't following along, the submitter of this story was Wil Wheaton, yes, Wesley Crusher himself...

    see http://www.wilwheaton.net/ for details.

    See if you can find him amongst the trolls and flames.

    --
    Sam Kennedy
    • Dear Wil (Score:3, Funny)

      by Rogerborg ( 306625 )

      I would like formally to apply for the role of "low level drone" in the Cult of Wheaton. I struggled against it, but to no avail. You epitomise all that is great and good in geekness. Please, let me join your Army of Dorkness, that I may contribute in a small way to your elevation to Spod Emperor. What is thy bidding, my master?

      And the scary bit is... I'm not joking. Wil is one seriously self aware guy, and I'm prepared to do a bit of chanting and genuflecting in his cause.

  • so his next obvious project will be to

    LEGO his Eggo...

    sorry.
  • ALERT (Score:4, Funny)

    by grub ( 11606 ) <slashdot@grub.net> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @09:46AM (#4783511) Homepage Journal

    A self-proclaimed "dork" has built one of the best..

    ALERT TO: self-proclaimed "dork"
    FROM: The Ghost of Jon Postel

    MSG BODY:Your dorkness has gone well past the levels allowed by all RFC standards. You are now in the "nerd" category, please refer to yourself with this label from now on.

    Thank you,
    postel, watching you from afar..

    (NB: no disrespectintended in the least)
  • Fun Facts (Score:3, Funny)

    by glassware ( 195317 ) on Saturday November 30, 2002 @02:28PM (#4784390) Homepage Journal
    Thank you, Wil, for mentioning the "House" phrase. Here is a history of this phrase as far as I am aware.

    1) In 1995, Blizzard released Warcraft II. The Goblin Zeppelin unit, when repeatedly clicked, had a set of silly phrases it would say. "I can see my house from here!" was born.

    2) For a long time, nothing.

    3) September, 2001. The series premiere of Star Trek: Enterprise, a few Klingons are invited to view a Holodeck for the first time. Presented with a recreation of the Klingon homeworld, one of them utters the phrase, "I can see my house from here!" in a guttural Klingon accent. Fans of the phrase are delighted.

    4) July, 2002. The incredible Mr. Krol takes over the voice of the Goblin Zeppelin for the new Warcraft III. Although the phrase "I can see my house from here!" is absent from the game, early reviews of "What what what?!?" are positive.

    5) November, 2002. Wil Wheaton uses the phrase in a Slashdot Posting, although we do not have an audio file of him saying it. Fans of the phrase are delighted and hopeful.

  • by stwrtpj ( 518864 ) <p.stewartNO@SPAMcomcast.net> on Saturday November 30, 2002 @04:18PM (#4784724) Journal
    ... the fact that this guy spent all this time putting this model together from detailed designs or the fact that the first thought that entered my head when I saw it was "Hey, I think I have enough LEGO pieces in the right colors to build that"

To downgrade the human mind is bad theology. - C. K. Chesterton

Working...