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Comment Not really (Score 2) 73

Branching happens all the time, either to develop a feature or because it's doing something that upstream won't accept. One man maintaining his own patches isn't a fork. A fork would imply that that you're planning to diverge from or replace the project you branched from, nothing in his post indicates he wants to compete with Linux or the LKML. He's just saying I'll make my own patches and provide them for those who want them, but I'm not going to bother trying to upstream them. Kinda like Debian and Ubuntu, Canonical made a lot of patches for Debian but they weren't trying to fork it. They just rebased off it every six months, being a downstream variation. He's making a downstream variation with some interface from BSD. Big whoop.

Comment Blocking the Japanese ministry of agriculture? (Score 2) 22

The published Angler nginx proxy server configuration contains


That block belongs to the Japanese "Ministry of Agriculture,Forestry and Fisheries - Agriculture,Forestry and Fisheries Research Council". I wonder what the story is behind that.

Submission Porsche chooses Apple over Google because Google wants too much data->

countach44 writes: As reported in number 5 of this list from Motor Trend, Porsche went with Apple over Google for the infotainment system in its new 911. Apparently, Android Auto wants vehicle data (throttle position, speed, coolant temp, etc...) whereas Apple Play only needs to know if the car is in motion. Speculation is around what Google, as a company building its own car, wants that data for.
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Virgin Galactic raised taxes? (Score 1) 170

What the fuck does race have to do with whether or not the locals count as complete morons for trusting "Sir" Branson during one of his manic episodes?

I don't have the slightest clue what race makes up the majority of that area, but I too would call them "stupid and greedy".

Submission Europe's highest court just rejected the US's 'safe harbor' agreement->

craigtp writes: The European Court of Justice has just ruled that the transatlantic Safe Harbour agreement, which lets American companies use a single standard for consumer privacy and data storage in both the US and Europe, is invalid.

The ruling came after Edward Snowden's NSA leaks showed that European data stored by US companies was not safe from surveillance that would be illegal in Europe.

This ruling could have profound effects on all US based companies, not just tech companies, that rely upon the "safe harbor" agreement to allow them to store their European customers' data in the US.

Under this new ruling, they could effectively be forced to store European customers' data in Europe and then have to follow 20 or more different sets of national data privacy regulations.

Link to Original Source

Submission EU Court Invalidates Europe-US Safe Harbour Data Sharing Agreement

Mickeycaskill writes: The top court of the European Union on Tuesday has suspended an agreement that has allowed data-sharing between the EU and the US for the past 15 years, following months of increased tensions over spying and the protection of personal data.

The ruling was the court’s final decision in a data-protection case brought by 27-year-old Austrian law student Max Schrems against the Irish data protection commissioner. Schrems was concerned his data on Facebook could be shared with US intelligence.

The court declared that Safe Harbour deal was “invalid” as it takes data on European citizens outside the protection of European authorities. The deal was originally intended to facilitate data-transfers to the US, a country whose data-protection regime is less stringent than that of the EU.

Safe Harbour has been enforced since 2000, but has been reviewed since 2013 following Edward Snowden's relevations about mass surveillance. A new agreement on a new deal is thought to be close, but the invalidation of the current agreement, in place since 2000, is likely to create difficulties for many trans-Atlantic companies in the short term.

Comment Re:Emissions testing needs to be fool proof (Score 1) 87

Passenger car emission standards are g/mi and are the same for all fuel types. Epa is exploring ways to combat this type of fraud. But any test they make needs to be objective and reproducible for all vehicles, so it may be hard to eliminate this cheat vector.

No. What they need to do is to create an objective and reproducible test, then a "sanity check" where the car is driven an ordinary, mixed road trip with a sensor attached to the exhaust pipe that can't in any reasonable way be distinguished from ordinary driving. The latter will obviously be somewhat variable due to the particular route, road conditions, environmental temperature, traffic and so on but I imagine it would be a fairly narrow band that could be considered normal. If it exceeds that, start investigating.

Submission Humans Are More Toxic to Wildlife than Chernobyl->

derekmead writes: The Chernobyl disaster remains the worst nuclear accident in human history, with a death toll that is difficult to tally even decades later. Given the sobering reach of the resulting radiation contamination, you might expect the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone—the 4,200 square kilometers in the immediate vicinity of the explosion—to have suffered serious long-term ecological damage.

Surprisingly, though, a study published today in Current Biology shows that wildlife in the exclusion zone is actually more abundant than it was before the disaster. According to the authors, led by Portsmouth University professor of environmental science Jim Smith, the recovery is due to the removal of the single biggest pressure on wildlife—humans.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 1) 130

The medallions avoid a couple things,
- drivers charging on a hail unsafely then haggling over who can carry them
- lots of empty cabs driving around

Gas prices and the expense of operating a vehicle in the city takes care of the second. Taxi companies won't run cabs if they're not making money, so the problem is self-limiting. Medallions only serve to artificially limit supply.

Comment Re:Solid is better for a long live maintainance. (Score 1) 42

If it is liquid as mercury then it can make corrosion to the metals or semiconductors. It is a bad notice of using liquid in the system.

Inorite? Like, just imagine if they decided to use molten sodium hydroxide, that shit'll eat just about anything you throw at it, even glass - These engineers must count as such complete morons! XD

Seriously, why the hell would you jump right to assuming they would use some sort of corrosive liquid for this system? Realistically, you just use a light mineral oil, or if you have the budget for it, something like Fluorinert.

Comment reLOCATES the heatsink and fans (Score 5, Insightful) 42

Liquid cooling, no matter how efficient, still requires you to dump the waste heat somewhere. You don't magically get to just seal up the vents in the case because "liquid!".

That said, yes, this counts as a very cool (no pun intended) step forward, and will vastly improve the number of transistors we can pack into an arbitrary sized box - But make no mistake, that "savings" comes at the cost of needing an external radiator.


Submission Cold Fusion Rears Ugly Head with Claims of Deuterium Powered Homes->

szczys writes: Ah, who can forget the cold-fusion fiasco of the early 1990's? Promises of room-temperature fusion machines in every home providing nearly-free energy for all. Relive those glory days of hype with this report of Deuterium-Based Home Reactors. Elliot Williams does a good job of deflating the sensationalism by pointing out all of the "breakthroughs", their lack of having any other labs successfully verify the experiments, and the fact that many of the same players from the news stories in the 90s are once again wrapped up in this one.
Link to Original Source

Submission Worst Tech Recruiter 'Pickup Lines'

snydeq writes: We've all received them: Trawling emails from tech recruiters looking to lure us away from our current employer, often with a cringe-worthy line or two that makes it seem as if we are being courted by an unwanted pickup artist. From the article: 'The men and women tasked with recruiting tech talent go to great lengths to attract the attention of their targets — (often unsuspecting) tech pros viewed as valuable "gets." While some recruiters prove to be invaluable in improving your career, finding exactly the right words to pique your interest in a new gig, far more seem to stammer, stumble, and elicit exasperated sighs.' What are the best doozies you've received?

Comment Re:Cool article... (Score 2) 130

One of the reasons Uber, Lyft and all the other "ride sharing" app companies get so much flack because they are breaking the law.

I'd be more sympathetic if 1) Uber and Lyft were offering the same services as taxis (you can't flag down an Uber; you have to request one), and 2) many jurisdictions hadn't already ruled that you're wrong.

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 3, Interesting) 130

In most jurisdictions the taxi companies have been subject to more rigorous (i.e. expensive) standards than Uber has been following.

...because they paid good money to write those laws. Taxi laws are a prime example of regulatory capture. For example, Company A got a sweet deal on credit card readers and they spent 2 years installing them in their cabs. Then, they tell the local regulatory body that credit card readers are a necessary public good and suggest that all taxis should have readers installed in a reasonable time frame - say, within three months. Finally, they laugh as their competitors scramble to shell out inflated prices for emergency rush orders on credit card readers so that they can stay in business.

For another example, three companies get together for group bargaining with an insurance company: "if you give us a good rate, we'll guarantee that all of our cabs will carry your new expanded coverage." Once that deal's in place, they ask for regulations to require all taxis to carry that level of coverage. Of course, all other companies have to pay the un-negotiated rate and now they have a harder time competing.

You don't get to write the laws and then bitch about them. Well, apparently you can, but you shouldn't be able to.

A committee is a group that keeps the minutes and loses hours. -- Milton Berle