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Comment Re:Of course it does (Score 0) 432

That's not how most sane, non-SJW's define it.

That's how it's been defined in private industry for decades (although it has eased off a bit in recent years).

If a member of a protected class feels threatened or uncomfortable, they were harassed. Period. Should I tell a woman I like her new haircut? Nope - that can be taken as a sexual advance - lawsuit time.

Comment Re:We never had it (Score 1) 311

I mostly agree with what you say - "quality" journalism really means carefully researched and well written, but usually still one sided. NYT and NPR are the most obvious examples of this.

In the past people had to pay for journalism by buying newspapers, magazines, or watching/listening to advertising, so the outlets that marketed themselves as "quality" had it easier - the price was essentially the same for consumers whether the journalism appeared good or bad. Today the choice is free for rehashed wire service stories or pay for the perception of a better product. And people are choosing free.

Submission + - Company to employees - Take a blood test or lose your health coverage (bloomberg.com)

schwit1 writes: Dale Arnold, who worked for Wisconsin plastics maker Flambeau, chose not to take his work-sponsored health assessment and biometric screening. The company responded by pulling his insurance coverage.

Like many employers, Flambeau uses a wellness program to cut insurance costs by encouraging healthy employee habits. In the past, submitting to on-site tests of blood pressure, body-mass, and cholesterol meant saving a few hundred dollars. Now companies such as Flambeau have gone a step farther, denying healthcare entirely to those who don't participate. People like Arnold must instead pay for more expensive coverage through the government's COBRA program.

According to several federal courts-including one that ruled in favor of Flambeau-this is all perfectly legal.

Submission + - Hormone 'extends lifespan by 40% (dailymail.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: A team at Yale School of Medicine have identified a hormone, produced by the thymus glad, extends lifespan by 40 per cent. Their findings reveal increased levels of the hormone, known as FGF21, protects the immune system against the ravages of age.

Researchers said the study could have implications in the future for improving immune function in the elderly, for obesity, and for diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes.

Submission + - Feds Want to Lower Legal Driving Limit to One Drink (freebeacon.com)

schwit1 writes: The National Transportation Safety Board wants to decrease the legal driving limit to one drink, lowering the legal limit on blood-alcohol content to 0.05 "or even lower."

The agency released its "most wanted list" on Wednesday, a laundry list of policies it would like implemented nationally. The list includes recommendations to reduce the current 0.08 blood alcohol content limit and outlaw all cell phone use while driving, even hands-free technology.

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