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+ - Creating bacterial 'fight clubs' to discover new drugs->

Science_afficionado writes: Vanderbilt chemists have shown that creating bacterial "fight clubs" is an effective way to discover natural biomolecules with the properties required for new drugs. They have demonstrated the method by using it to discover a new class of antibiotic with anti-cancer properties.
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Comment: Re:a bright future (Score 1) 39 39

You don't seem to understand what you have written.

You claimed that this prototype aircraft "makes it very clear that it's entirely possible" to replace fossil fueled aircraft with solar powered aircraft. The only thing that Solar Impulse has made clear is that a solar powered aircraft can be flown; there is nothing to indicate that a solar powered aircraft of any design or any efficiency can possibly replace fossil fueled aircraft as you claimed.

Comment: Re:a bright future (Score 1) 39 39

i made no claim that this ultra-lightweight solar-powered plane could be used for a commercial flight filled with cargo and hundreds of passengers,

You did indeed make that claim:

it's entirely possible to replace our environmentally destructive planes with solar planes

+ - Taiwan water park powder explosion injures hundreds->

bswarm writes: More than 500 people were injured when fire ripped through crowds at a party at an amusement park outside Taiwan's capital Taipei.
Saturday's incident at the Formosa Water Park is believed to have happened when a coloured powder ignited after being discharged onto the crowd.
Apparently they forgot about the fire hazards of fine powder or dust. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

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+ - SPAM: Brain research promises better understanding of schizophrenia, autism spectrum d

ijayquan007 writes: Our brain recognizes objects within milliseconds, even if it only receives rudimentary visual information. Researchers believe that reliable and fast recognition works because the brain is constantly making predictions about objects in the field of view and is comparing these with incoming information.
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Comment: Re:Emergency services? (Score 1) 118 118

Jetpack Guy flies in near house with a family of 4 on top of it, as the flood waters rise.

With only 30 minutes of flight time and only the pilot on board I'd say that's not a good application either. A helicopter with pilot and copilot that can stay up for a couple of hours would be far more practical.

Comment: Re:Another great Scalia line (Score 3, Insightful) 1069 1069

In both cases he ruled that the laws made by legislatures should be respected; specifically the US is a federation of states and the states have wide autonomy to govern themselves.

And please, get over the fact that Gore lost. He was out in California and New York giving speeches in front of friendly crowds that ran up his popular vote while Bush was in the swing states trying to win the electoral count If presidents were elected by popular vote the campaign would have tried to maximize the popular vote, but presidents are elected by those autonomous states, not popular vote..

.

+ - Why Don't Software Developers Use Static Analysis Tools to Find Bugs?->

An anonymous reader writes: Using static analysis tools for automating code inspections can be beneficial for software engineers. Such tools can make finding bugs, or software defects, faster and cheaper than manual inspections. Despite the benefits of using static analysis tools to find bugs, research suggests that these tools are underused. The research explains why developers are not widely using static analysis tools and how current tools could potentially be improved.

P.S. This article has earned more than 80 points at Hacker News: https://news.ycombinator.com/i...

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Much of the excitement we get out of our work is that we don't really know what we are doing. -- E. Dijkstra

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