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+ - Pilot error caused Air Algerie crash ..->

An anonymous reader writes: 'Two judges .. found the "failure to activate the anti-icing system" of the plane's motors was the main cause of the crash .. the McDonnell Douglas 83 jet ran into trouble after the crew did not activate the system, causing the failure of certain sensors.'

"As of February 2013, the MD-80 series has been involved in 61 incidents, including 31 hull-loss accidents, with 1,330 fatalities of occupants." ref

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:This makes complete sense (Score 1) 43 43

This really applies for long-term deployments

Not really. Ships don't just go out to the middle of the ocean and drive around in circles. When deployed they spend most of their time in port. Even when out at sea it's rarely a problem getting small parts to a ship by helicopter; bigger parts usually require a visit to a shipyard anyway. Plus what usually breaks down is electronic.

+ - AMAgeddon: Reddit mods are locking up the site's most popular pages In protest->

vivaoporto writes: As reported by The Independent, CNET, The Register, TechCrunch, The Verge and PC World moderators are locking up the site's most popular pages in protest against the dismissal of Victoria Taylor, a key member of the site's behind-the-scenes team.

Taylor, who was the main facilitator for the site's question-and-answer community 'Ask Me Anything' (graced by the presence of notables like Barack Obama, Jerry Seinfeld and regular folks like a line cook at Applebee's) was fired yesterday, causing all sorts of problems for Reddit's most mainstream offering.

Taylor's reported departure, which has been dubbed AMAgeddon, led other moderators of the marquee IAmA subreddit to switch the page's settings to private, rendering the Reddit userbase unable to view the page.

Since then, dozens of other subreddits including /r/askreddit, /r/videos, /r/gaming and /r/gadets — each with several million subscribers — have also been made private, instead re-directing readers to a static landing page.

Reddit’s cofounder and executive chairman Alexis Ohanian said in a post that “we don’t talk about specific employees. (...) We get that losing Victoria has a significant impact on the way you manage your community, (...) I’d really like to understand how we can help solve these problems, because I know r/IAMA thrived before her and will thrive after."

A full recap of the situation is available at the site itself, with the insight by the site's own members about the whole situation.

This comes in the wake of other highly controversial past events like the response to what became known as The Fappening, and the more recent ban of the controversial but populat FatPeopleHate subreddit.

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Can someone please explain (Score 1) 60 60

You are almost correct. You cannot reach an orbital plane that is inclined less than your launch site's latitude. So you can reach any orbit from the Equator.

Once launched you cannot "change the orbital plane", that would take almost as much energy as the initial launch. In theory it's possible but the rockets we have are nowhere near light and powerful enough

Comment: Headline is wrong (Score 3, Insightful) 105 105

FTFA:

Today’s revelations underscore the urgent need for significant legal reform, including proper pre-judicial authorisation and meaningful oversight of the use of surveillance powers by the UK security services, the organisation said.

Even Amnesty International stated that the surveillance doesn't appear to be illegal under current law.

Comment: Buzzword association (Score 3, Interesting) 64 64

I had to follow the link to Hughes' report to find how he created the list of inputs:

by importing a pair-wise comma-separated list of skills and their similarity scores ...

we’re generating that automatically from job descriptions posted on our site.

So what this really shows is how often the same two buzzwords appear together in a job description posted on Dice.

I found another comment in his report interesting:

We also tried using the resume dataset, but the results were of a lower quality,

I assume by "lower quality" he really means "people list every buzzword they can think of on the resumes posted on Dice".

Given the inputs I wouldn't expect any surprises in the results. But that said, it's an interesting project and they did a very nice job with the visualization.

"Any excuse will serve a tyrant." -- Aesop

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