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Comment: Re:Why doesn't Moz acknowledge the market share is (Score 1) 132

by shutdown -p now (#49384375) Attached to: Firefox 37 Released

What they don't realize is that Firefox was created to "take back the web" from the stagnating Internet Explorer 6. It was never about replacing IE as some overbearing dominant beast.

The problem is that it still ended up with an overbearing dominant beast, just a different one - Chrome (or rather WebKit/Blink, but Chrome is the lion's share of that). The good part is that we're still in the stage where stagnation is not a thing yet. The bad part is that it could change literally overnight.

Comment: Re:Grossly Over-o's Here (Score 1) 118

by fyngyrz (#49384087) Attached to: Amazon Launches 'Home Services' For Repair, Installation, and Other Work

If you know of grammar errors or other writing problems / errors on my page(s), I will be delighted to fix them, and also to learn how to do better. Because doing the best one can is important. Better to strive to paint like an actual painter than to be satisfied with finger-painting like an addled child. So fire away. :)

Comment: Re:Yes, it's free. Also, the patent system sucks (Score 1) 176

The room of litigation is always there, obviously. But how can the language be worse than the default, unless it somehow explicitly overrides and rescinds some provisions of the original license under which the code is released?

If true, the next obvious question: can the same be done to GPL(v2)?

Comment: Re:Full benefits & Full responsibility (Score 1) 206

by dbIII (#49383783) Attached to: Nation's Biggest Nuclear Firm Makes a Play For Carbon Credit Cash
Wow - some of those U-238 numbers are two orders of magnitude higher than I've ever seen.
Still, it's a bottom ash situation because it's going to be heavy and not going to be reduced in the boiler. As others pointed out that ash still has to go somewhere even if it's not actually going up the stack, so it's not something that can be ignored.

Comment: Re:Yes, it's free. Also, the patent system sucks (Score 1) 176

Bruce, to clarify: are you saying that, since the code in question is released under the MIT license, which is OSI approved, there is an implicit patent grant there that renders the separate explicit one basically redundant, and this whole thing is a non-story?

Comment: Re:It is open source, it isn't free (Score 1) 176

Yes, there is a difference between open source and free. But you completely missed the point in that the authors are complaining that "Open Source" .NET does not comply with standard open source terms. The promise not to sue over patents is flimsy at best.

Given that the code in question is released under MIT license (which is considered open source by everyone, including officially by OSI), and the patent promise is on top of that, and only grants you additional rights on top of the license grants, aren't you basically saying that using an open source license alone is not sufficient, then? And that most software released under pretty much any open source license (including GPLv2) does not "comply with standard open source terms"? I mean, most of them don't come with any kind of patent promise at all, nor will anyone guarantee that there aren't any patents applicable to them.

Comment: Re:Just use Python. (Score 1) 176

You assume that someone, somewhere, isn't holding a patent that Python infringes upon. That's a pretty big assumption, given the sheer number of software patents issued.

That's kind of one of the obvious things that people are missing about all this... a patent promise, even a meager one, is better than no promise at all, which is what you get with most software these days.

Comment: Re:Yeah! (Score 2) 187

Yes, how dare the US government insist on there being some standards and paperwork for a flying machine that moves at freeway speed, weighs as much as a child, has spinning blades of doom, a battery that can catch fire if poked wrong and will be built by a company that has trouble taping a box closed.

And does nothing to actual develop these standards.

"Now this is a totally brain damaged algorithm. Gag me with a smurfette." -- P. Buhr, Computer Science 354

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