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Comment Re:Corruption at every level (Score 1) 133

Ok, I'll explain it to you in a way that makes it easier to understand for somebody who is hang up on the idea that either everything should be provided or nothing at all.

A person can offer you to use his kitchen for free to cook your food if you have no kitchen but in exchange for the free use of his kitchen you have to buy groceries from that person. You could say that the person is running a grocery store and the price of using the 'free' kitchen is included in the price of the groceries.

I can extend this further: you are going to a restaurant and you are not bringing your own food with you, you are getting the nice restaurant experience (the interior, the music, the ambient lighting, the climate, whatever) but you are buying the food from the restaurant, you are not allowed to bring your own with you to eat there.

There is nothing at all wrong with a business model that is offering you a SPECIFIC THING and not other things. Of-course in the so called 'freest country on Earth' this idea is long gone after Obama forced the insurance companies to provide insurance plans that include specific things in them, making it illegal to provide insurance plans without those types of things.

Government interference is bad for the market, not good. If somebody is offering a product, as a potential customer it is your choice to take the product or not to take the product. If the price is 'free' but the government says that this product cannot be provided under those specific conditions, you will not get that product at all.

Is it better for you to get a product with limited functionality than no product at all? You decide, but instead of leaving it up to you, the government says: you cannot decide, you are too stupid to decide, you are too ignorant to decide, you are too childish to decide, et.

That's government oppression, not freedom.

Comment Re:The one lesson developers should learn (Score 1) 39

There is nothing wrong to "depend on other people's servers" as long as you have a contract, an SLA in place. To depend on other people's servers is perfectly fine as long as there is an understanding on both sides what that means exactly.

To depend on the servers of people who don't owe you anything and to who you don't owe anything either, that's a different story.

Comment Gold Standard, Liberty Rating (Score 1) 459

One of the most successful things that Free-Staters and local NH libertarians have done is to produce the Gold Standard a voting guide that is handed out every week to every member of the NH House and Senate, before floor votes. To produce the doc, a small army of volunteers reads and grades all the incoming legislation according to a standardized scale. The most important pro- or anti-liberty legislation is debated on a private list, and once we have solid bullet-points to clarify our position, we produce the doc. We then grade the legislators on their votes, and produce an annual legislative report card. We are the only group, other than the (R) and (D) parties, to produce a consistent voting recommendation for years on end. At first lots of legislators ignored us. Then we started targeting the lowest-ranked legislators in elections, and got some of the worst eliminated; and donated money to the best rated. Now some hate us, but all respect us.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 459

Glen Aldrich is a carpenter with no more than a high school diploma.

I think having regular citizen legislators, with not much financial gain to be had from the job, is an excellent way to run a state house. It means you are more likely to get people involved for the right reasons, instead of career politicians looking for money and power.

I concur, and note that the first Free-Stater elected to the NH House was also a carpenter (technically, a contractor). Here's his victory speech; it's quite telling.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 459

And I personally believe that they should spend as much time reviewing old laws for relevance, modification and possible repeal as they do making new ones.

So do I, but not even full-time legislatures do that.

Actually up until 2 years ago, NH had a standing House Committee whose whole purpose was to find unconstitutional laws, and submit them for elimination or alteration to be Constitutional. That changed when the Speaker of the House changed. But another nifty thing about NH: the entire government, from Governor to lowly State Rep, is up for re-election each and every 2 years :)

Comment Full Circle (Score 1) 459

I first heard about the Free State Project from a slashdot story in October 2003, when they announced that New Hampshire was the target state. At the time I was on a 1-year work contract in Australia, and all I knew was that when I returned to the USA, I did not want to return to the high taxes, high population density and (comparatively) bad air quality of the Bay Area. As a libertarian myself, it was a no-brainer, especially after I read the "101 Reasons to choose New Hampshire" document (which has subsequently been turned into a video documentary). So I went back to California just long enough to make arrangements. I moved to NH in June 2005, making me mover #107.

In the time I have been here, some 1,900 other "early movers" have also come. We have gone from electing a few Free-Staters to local city councils and planning boards, to our first State Representative, to now having some two dozen Free-Stater State Reps, and having pulled many of the existing State Reps and Senators (especially the Republican ones) in a much more libertarian direction. I will never forget the ex-Marine State Rep who in 2006 told me he would "never, ever in his life" allow "legal dope", to that same Rep now voting for full marijuana legalization every single time it comes up. We were the first state to pass same-sex marriage via a legislative process (not popular referendum). We passed medical marijuana. We have no adult seat belt law, no helmet law, open carry and shall-issue concealed carry (and are likely to pass constitutional carry next session). We have eliminated all state knife laws, absolutely rejected Real-ID ("and any de-facto national identity system that may follow therefrom"), forbidden the State to use automated license plate scanners, and passed a law affirming a defendant's right to explain Nullification to the jury.

We don't need all 20,000 to show up. Another 4-5K people, if they do the same things as the first 2K, and NH will bear very little resemblance to the police-states/welfare-states of the rest of the USA... and much more resemblance to the society described in the New Hampshire Constitution, which is summed up well by Article 10:

Government being instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security, of the whole community, and not for the private interest or emolument of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government. The doctrine of nonresistance against arbitrary power, and oppression, is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.

Comment Re:Easiest things to do. (Score 1) 1838

That is a very U.S./Eurocentric point of view (and I am a USian myself). ISO 8859-1 and -15 work only for Latin alphabets. The other parts add support for Cyrillic, Thai, Arabic, Celtic and a few others, but still fail to support Chinese, Korean, Japanese, and many others. In addition, processing ISO 8859 text is very painful compared to, say, UTF-8. Just go to UTF, and sanitize out any characters that may cause injection or other issues.

Comment merging threads (Score 1) 1838

Well, I am going to throw it out there, I actually came up with this idea years ago but only implemented a version of it for a client of mine, who decided not to use the feature in the forum that we created for their system. However just a thought, maybe it could be done here and maybe it could have a positive result.

The idea is that often the same question is posed or a statement is made across multiple threads and the answer to all of those could be the same exact one, so why repost the same comment over and over?

The design idea that I came up with and we implemented was to mark a number of comments and then write one reply instead of many replies. Then each one of those parent comments would have a reply to it, that would indicate that this is a merged reply.

Leaving more comments on this merged reply actually moves the conversation to the merged thread instead of keeping individual replies to the merged comment in their individual threads.

I think it's useful, others may disagree.

Oh, also metamoderation - it doesn't work here. People really should have to justify 'Troll' or 'Flamebait' or 'Overrated' because it's easy to use those simply to shut down an opinion.

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