Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:So what? (Score 1) 79

To be fair their website would not be equivalent to shouting in your basement. Google would index it, etc. But only people looking for the information would find it, and this appears to have been an advertisement intended to reach people who were not currently considering the problem. So their own web page wouldn't be a useful option.

Comment Re:Lighten up .... the people reviewing the photos (Score 1) 79

The temporary censorship is a problem, but not the major problem, as that was corrected. The major problem is that it was difficult to reach someone who both could and would address the problem. I've been in that situation so often that I find THAT problem hard to forgive.

Comment Re: Lighten up .... the people reviewing the photo (Score 1) 79

It's clear that they EVENTUALLY got in contact with Facebook, but possibly only indirectly. It's not at all clear whether this happened before or after the story hit the news. Having called technical support at some companies and been put on hold for over an hour, I'm not willing to give Facebook the benefit of the doubt. I could be wrong, but I'll require at least *some* evidence before I'll believe it.

Comment Re:Lighten up .... the people reviewing the photos (Score 1) 79

That's probably correct, but they made it difficult to contact them, which removes any excuse that "it was an automated system that did it" provides.

Yes, if they made it easy to contact them they'd probably get LOTS of complaints. Guess what, They OUGHT to get lots of complaints.

Personally, I don't understand why people are willing to use Facebook, but since they are there are they are a public accomodation. It's not quite the same as a monopoly, though there are certain similarities, strongly reinforced by the network effect. As such for them to refuse service should be a crime. When this is going on internationally, though, things get quite complex, so they have an obligation to make contact, explanation, and negotiation easy when they refuse service. When they don't I start seeing valid reasons for countries to refuse to allow them to do business within "their borders".

Comment Re:"Sweeping Outage"??? (Score 2) 164

Congratulations for earning the "Eurotrash idiot of the thread" award. I didn't think a technical story like this could get the award, but you nailed it. Maybe you need to stop reading US websites. Read European technology websites, like, uh, I'm not really sure, but I'm sure they're there and a thousand times better than Slashdot.

Comment Re:Good! (Score 1) 277

Populism? What does this have to do with Donald Trump? The Fukushima disaster permanently ruined the name of nuclear power. I see we are unfamiliar with left-wing and environmentalist causes. The entire issue is dead as a doornail. Nuclear = bye-bye. You don't believe me, go ask them yourselves (and bring a flameproof coat, these people get REALLY angry about the issue).

Comment Re: Ignores the issue (Score 1) 106

Why would the Clinton campaign risk doing anything now, when they're already cruising towards a landslide victory? Trump did a fantastic job of disqualifying himself at the debates; now all they have to do is run out he clock. To try some "October surprise" at this point would gain them very little, but if it went wrong somehow it could hurt them greatly.

Comment Re: Great way to kill the competition by making it (Score 3, Insightful) 298

Customer -> Uber -> Driver -> Tesla -> Self-driving Software -> local, state, national laws about self-driving cars -> local, state, national laws about ride sharing -> Insurance companies... figuring out who to sue and who pays in case of an accident would be like legal Inception.

Comment Under what circumstances would a user notice? (Score 2) 155

Are there situations where a user would notice a slower flash write speed on their cell phone?

The only time I can think of where a phone would need to write massive amounts to flash is during an OS upgrade (which is hopefully a rare thing) -- even during an app install, the user is likely to be bounded by their network's download speed, not by the speed of writing to flash. Similarly, while recording live video, the phone only needs to write at the bandwidth of the video stream, no faster.

Is there some use case I'm missing?

Slashdot Top Deals

The trouble with computers is that they do what you tell them, not what you want. -- D. Cohen