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Submission + - Recording Industry: Copyright Terms At Life+50, instead of Life+70 is too costly (techdirt.com)

schwit1 writes: Okay. I've heard lots of crazy arguments from the record labels, but I may have found the craziest. We've discussed how ridiculous it is that the TPP includes a provision saying that every country that signs on must make sure the minimum copyright term is life plus 70 years. This will impact many of the countries that negotiated the agreement, which currently have terms set at life plus 50. This was a key point that the recording industry and Hollywood fought hard for. When even the Copyright Office recognizes that life plus 70 is too long in many cases, the legacy industries recognized that getting copyright term extension through Congress in the US might be difficult — so why not lock stuff in via international agreements?

And, of course, the USTR was fine with this, because the USTR goes along with basically everything that Hollywood asks for. But here's the crazy part: having gotten such a ridiculous thing, the recording industry is whining about its own victory. As Kimberlee Weatherall points out, the recording industry in New Zealand is bitching about the fact that the change doesn't go into effect immediately because it's "too costly" for copyright holders.

That's because the TPP has a "phase-in period" that allows countries to adjust and gradually move copyright terms upwards. But the record labels are having none of that:

Meeting before a parliamentary committee this week, Recorded Music chief executive Damian Vaughan said his advocacy group supports an article in the TPP deal that standardizes the terms of protection of a work to the life of an author plus 70 years. (New Zealand is one of several participating nations that currently has a term of 50 years after death.) However, Vaughan thinks a proposed phase-in period for nations upgrading to 70 years is unnecessary and a costly burden for rights holders.

"It's not making copyright simple or easy to understand to the music user or the public whatsoever," he said, according to RadioNZ. "It is making the process significantly more complicated, and it's the rights organizations and the copyright holders who will be forced to administer this We note the cost we incur will be far higher than any perceived cost savings."


Submission + - Is it time for a new audio format for recording? 4

tezbobobo writes: Why isn't recording information embedded in recorded audio files? When I edit a photo in Photoshop Lightroom the RAW file usually contains information about the camera, lens, location, and settings used. When I import a WAV from my field recorder the software is completely oblivious to the recorder used and the microphone. I can't even tell the software to compensate for a certain mic with profiles. So, it it time for some new standards?

Submission + - Fedora 25 To Replace X.Org Server With Wayland (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Fedora 25 will finally be the first release for this Linux distribution — and the first tier-one desktop Linux OS at large — that is going ahead and using Wayland by default. Wayland has been talked about for years as a replacement to the xorg-server and finally with the upcoming Fedora 25 release this is expected to become a reality. The X.Org Server will still be present on Fedora systems for those running into driver problems or other common issues.

Submission + - SPAM: Quake Champions "is not on Id Tech 6"

SlappingOysters writes: In an interview with Finder at last weekend's QuakeCon event in Dallas, Texas, Tim Willits spoke about whether the upcoming Quake Champions will be compatible with the Vulkan API. In the process of answering that question, Willits revealed that Quake Champions is not being built on id Software's Id Tech 6 game engine. Instead it is being built on a hybrid engine derived from developer Sabre Interactive's in-house tech, so many of the features of Doom will not be available.

Submission + - A Smaller Version of Raspberry Pi 3 Is Coming Soon (pcworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A smaller version of the popular Raspberry Pi 3 will go on sale in a few months. Raspberry Pi is developing a new version of its Compute Module, a single-board computer that plugs into specific on-board memory slots. The new Pi will be more like a mini-computer inside a computer, and it won't come with a power supply. The Compute Module will have similar circuitry to that of Raspberry Pi 3, a wildly successful computer that can be a PC replacement. But it will be smaller, with the memory, CPU, and storage embedded tightly on a board. While the Compute Module will have a 64-bit ARM processor like the Pi 3, it won't have Wi-Fi, Eben Upton, founder of Raspberry Pi, said in an interview with IDG News Service. The Compute Module could ship as soon as this quarter, Upton said. It will be priced similar to its predecessor, the 2-year-old Compute Module, available from reseller RS Components for about $24. The older Compute Module is based on the original Raspberry Pi. Like Raspberry Pi 3, the new Compute Module will work with Linux and Microsoft's Windows 10 IoT Core, Upton said. A Compute Module Development Kit, in which the Compute Module can be slotted for testing, may also be sold. The Development Kit could have multiple connectivity and port options, much like the Raspberry Pi 3.

Submission + - 60 people killed and many more injured in terrorist attack in Nice, France (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A truck slowly drove towards a crowd, accelerated and then hit people on the famous Promenade des Anglais shortly after celebratory fireworks had ended. July 14th is a national holiday in remembrance of the attack on the Bastille which started the French Revolution. The truck reportedly drove more than a mile before the driver was shot and the truck stopped.

Submission + - PM Theresa May drops political bombshell on Whitehall -- tech firms beware! (arstechnica.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: British Prime Minister Theresa May has given a stern warning to big business, telling the public to "think not of the powerful, but you." Specifically, she singled out Google and Amazon for dodging taxes and creating a lot of parliamentary scrutiny. Ars Technica reports: "May has been quick to stamp her brand of conservatism on her party by letting go of key members of Cameron's cabinet. She has so far sacked big hitters such as chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne, justice secretary Michael Gove, and culture secretary John Whittingdale. Philip Hammond now has the keys to Number 11, but we're still waiting to hear who will replace Whittingdale, whose remit included the rollout of super fast broadband in the UK. He's also the man behind the White Paper on the future of the BBC, which sought radical changes at the public service broadcaster. So far, 10 cabinet positions have been announced by May. They include Justine Greening as secretary of state for education, and Liz Truss becomes justice secretary, while former London mayor and key Brexit campaigner Boris Johnson — to the surprise of many — now heads up the foreign office. May has handed her home secretary job to Amber Rudd — who will now be responsible for the government's push for greater online surveillance laws. Rudd was previously the minister for energy and climate change."

Submission + - SPAM: Space reporter reveals how President Jimmy Carter saved the space shuttle

MarkWhittington writes: Eric Berger has published an account in Ars Technica about how President Jimmy Carter saved the space shuttle program. The article is well worth reading for its detail. In essence, around 1978 the space shuttle program had undergone a crisis with technical challenges surrounding its heat-resistant tiles and its reusable rocket engines and cost overruns. President Carter was not all that enthused about human space flight, to begin with, adhering to the since discredited notion that robotic space probes were adequate for exploring the universe. His vice president, Walter Mondale, was a vehement foe of human space flight programs, maintaining that money spent on them were better used for social programs.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Bitcoin 'miners' face fight for survival as new supply halves (reuters.com)

SpzToid writes: On Saturday, the reward for miners will be slashed in half. Written into bitcoin's code when it was invented in 2008 was a rule dictating that the prize would be halved every four years, in a step designed to keep a lid on bitcoin inflation.

From around 1700 GMT on Saturday, instead of 25 bitcoins up for grabs globally every 10 minutes, worth around $16,000 at the current rate BTC=BTSP, there will be just 12.5.

That means only the mining companies with the leanest operations will survive the ensuing profit hit.

"The most important thing is to be the most efficient miner," said Streng, the 26-year-old co-founder of German firm Genesis Mining, which has "mining farms" in Canada, the United States and eastern Europe, as well as in Iceland. "When the others drop out, that means that they leave the market and give you a bigger share of the pie."

Submission + - US Patent Attorney IP firm (taylorip.com)

wycoffuspa writes: We are a boutique IP firm focusing only on IP work. Our IP work consists of approximately 90% patents and 10% trademarks. Approximately 1/3 of work is from local clients, 1/3 is from national clients...

Submission + - First Water Clouds Reported Outside The Solar System (scientificamerican.com)

An anonymous reader writes: For the first time ever, astronomers have found strong evidence of water clouds on a body outside the solar system. New observations of a frigid object called WISE 0855, which lies 7.2 light-years from Earth, suggest that the "failed star" has clouds of water, or water ice, in its atmosphere, the researchers said. "We would expect an object that cold to have water clouds, and this is the best evidence that it does," study lead author Andrew Skemer, an assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz, said in a statement released by the university. Scientists discovered WISE 0855 in 2014, using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft. A later paper in 2014 (co-authored by Skemer) uncovered some evidence of water clouds in the object's atmosphere, based on limited photometric data (how bright the object is in specific light wavelengths). In the new study, Skemer and his colleagues used the Gemini North telescope in Hawaii to study the brown dwarf for 13 nights. Gemini North is located on the highest Hawaiian mountain (Mauna Kea), at an altitude with little water vapor to interfere with telescopic observations. These observations allowed the astronomers to make the first spectroscopy (light fingerprint) measurements of WISE 0855. The team found water vapor and also confirmed the object's temperature, which is about minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 23 degrees Celsius, or 250 kelvins).

Submission + - Atari 2600 designer Joe Decuir publishes his notes from 1977 (vintageisthenewold.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Joe Decuir started to work for Atari in 1975 and was one of the engineers responsible for designing the iconic Atari 2600 and the 8-bit computers 400/800.

The historian-podcaster-writer-archivist Kevin Savetz scanned Joe’s engineering notebooks from the time he worked at Atari and now the precious document is available at Internet Archive.

With handwritten notes and schematics, the content of the notebooks will probably only make sense to engineers and alike, but the fact that the document is available to the public and preserved digitally is a great achievement.

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