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Comment Re:KeePass FTW! (Score 2) 106

Having to manually lookup the site in your manager, copy the password and paste it in the form is too cumbersome.

Right, so most users without an intergrated password manager will just use an easy-to-guess password.

LastPass isn't perfect, but as a system it improves overall web security to a large extent by enabling people to use very-high-entropy passwords.

People who want to copy and paste from Keepass (I do for very high security sites) should keep on doing that. But, for Pete's sake, I hope you're not using the totally insecure X11 clipboard.

Submission + - SPAM: Quicken Bill Pay is No Longer Safe to Use 1

Bruce Perens writes: I don't usually make security calls, but when a company makes egregious and really clueless security mistakes, it's often the case that the only way to attract their attention and get the issue fixed is to publicize it. This one is with Quicken Bill Pay, a product of Metavante (not Intuit). It's from personal observation rather than an expert witness case, and the company has been unresponsive through their customer support channel.
Link to Original Source

Comment UX "expert" logic (Score 1) 248

What's that thing over there on the wall?

The fire exit?

Yeah the fire exit. I never see anyone use that ugly thing. Board it up.

But I've heard of people using it...

My studies have shown that only 1% of buildings ever use their fire exits! Board it up now and give it a nice white paint job! White is more interesting than color.

Comment Re: Liability (Score 1, Troll) 455

Libertarians believe that companies that oppress users will fail in the marketplace.

Can you show me a libertarian who believes that corporations should be able to show up with guns to enforce "intellectual property" like governments do?

Hint: libertarians believe in none of: corporations, intellectual property, or initiation of force. Nice strawman though.

Comment Re:Why is this news? (Score 1) 156

Isn't this obvious?

You knew about the interaction between the front and rear hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex? Heck, why did the researchers bother doing the fMRI study rather than posting an Ask Slashdot?

I presume here you're not simply reacting to the clickbait headline - that would be unkind.

Comment Re:Maps technology is lost... (Score 2) 156

apparently looking pretty is far more important than having accurate data.

yeah, most people believe that. People figure if they put very little effort into ease-of-use (aka aesthetics) they probably put very little effort into accuracy. It's not true, but humans are the desired userbase and humans use such heuristics.

Everybody has been telling OSM that for a decade but they refuse to accept that reality, so the userbase remains small. It's a shame to cede the territory to Google.

Comment Abandoning Time-Worn Processes Leads to Atrophy (Score 5, Insightful) 156

Scientists determined that those people who made use of machine washing rather than hand washing had diminished hand strength and neurological motor communication necessary for fine motor control. Seamstresses who bought thread rather than using the spinning jenny were similarly impaired. But worst off were teamsters who used the internal combustion trucks rather than teams of horses and used forklifts and other mechanical devices rather than loading their vehicles by hand. Their overall body strength was much reduced.

Submission + - EFF needs your help to stop Congress dismantling Internet privacy protections! (eff.org)

Peter Eckersley writes: Last year the FCC passed rules forbidding ISPs (both mobile and landline) from using your personal data without your consent for purposes other than providing you Internet access. In other words, the rules prevent ISPs from turning your browsing history into a revenue stream to sell to marketers and advertisers. Unfortunately, members of Congress are scheming to dismantle those protections as early as this week. If they succeed, ISPs would be free to resume selling users' browsing histories, pre-loading phones with spyware, and generally doing all sorts of creepy things to your traffic.

The good news is, we can stop them. We especially need folks in the key states of Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania to call their senators this week and tell them not to kill the FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules.

Together, we can stop Congress from undermining these crucial privacy protections.

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