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Comment Heh, haven't heard that name in a while. (Score 2) 10

I used to follow some of what The Jester wrote. There are a number of people out there who think he's overrated, more brag than anything else. Still, I saw some pretty clever things out of him. For example, at one point he was going after some other hacking collective (I don't recall which one), and he announced a successful attack against them and posted a list of all of their names and real IP addresses. Only, the list wasn't real. Instead, anyone who tried to download the list had their connection logged and probed, an exploit used to trigger the computer to make a (real) TCP connection back to one of his computers, and a number of automated attacks launched against targets it considered particularly suspect (for example, if there was evidence of being logged into a known member twitter account). I.e., it wasn't actually a list of suspects, it was bait to build a list of suspects. I think he did the same trick with QR codes later.

Comment Re:how about 4A (Score 1) 187

They couldn't force you with out the lead pipes and rubber hoses, fortunately those aren't allowed in the US yet. What you do in a situation like this is refuse to comply, force them to arrest you and spend the night in jail so you can call the ACLU and get the warrant tossed.

See they get away with it because no one refused to comply. Once everyone in the building complies there is no effective way to sue them and set a precedent that will stop this happening again. When they arrest you they move the warrant to the next stage and you now have grounds to sue them over the warrant that you don't have if you comply.

Sometimes standing up to illegal orders is hard, including being arrested hard. Know your rights and refuse illegal orders like this (yes I recognize the warrant was technically legal because it hadn't been challenged). Then use the arrest to go after them and make sure it never happens again.

Comment Re:You're being silly (Score 1) 277

General: "Don't worry about your families, boys. We moved them all to Fort Chupacabra, just while the emergency lasts, to keep them safe. So go out and do your duty without worrying about them."

They're guarded by troops from an entirely different unit, of course. In the Russian case they'd most likely be a different ethnicity.

Comment Re:Signal triangulation = GPS (Score 1) 156

Even without any atmosphere, the diffraction-limited resolution of a 2.5 m optical system watching from a 200 km altitude is limited to ~5 cm. Is that sufficient for reading the plates? (Even that number is only for watching from straight above, which sort of doesn't work for vehicle license plates - Pythagoras then applies for diagonal lines of view.)

Comment Re:Cui Bono? (Score 1) 131

Jesus Christ, "voter intimidation" now? Does the hyperbole ever end?

Face it, your candidate played the buffoon. More than likely he was playing you, but if you want to keep blaming the victor for the loser's real or self-contrived inadequacies, that is your problem. Voters have more than once in the history of democracy been faced with the choice between a flawed candidate and a dangerous one, and in most cases they will pick the flawed one. On the few occasions that a dangerous one has been chosen, it hasn't gone so well.

As to Wikileaks, even you can only make it interesting by exaggeration, which should tell you why it isn't making much impact. But go on, blame the voters, blame the press, blame some evil secret cabal, but under no circumstances ever blame Republican voters for picking probably one of the worst big ticket candidates in US history.

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