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Comment Re:Misjargonization (Score 1) 352

It might be an archaic term, but they've been in the business for a lot longer than you have (or you would have recognized the terminology).

I recognize the misuse just fine; I've been at this since the 1960's. Front panel toggles, punchcards and paper tape are wholly familiar to me, as are arranging diodes in a matrix and building CPUs out of RTL and TTL. The fact that I recognize the misuse is not motivation to appreciate it, any more than I would if some non-contemporaneous Babbage-era use of "gears" was suddenly thought to be a good idea to use as the go-to word for software, or if someone referred to a modern day stick of RAM as "core", or if someone insisted on referring to computers in general as abaci.

The industry is well centered around particular terminology right now and has been for decades. That's the terminology to use, unless you want people focusing more on what you said, than what you meant. Which tends to lead to the wrong place no matter what you do. Particularly in engineering. Words matter. Being sloppy is costly.

Comment Re: Becaue you aren't offering to do the work. (Score 2) 352

That's unfair. Blender did undergo some big changes, but they were more than justified. It's not like they're just continuously changing it, or that the changes weren't warranted. I think Blender is a better tool today because of their changes.

I have much more of an issue with GIMP. Pushing forth changes that the vast majority of the userbase hated (and railed against on the forum), and got a big "FU, if you don't like it, use another tool" response from the developers. Comments on the "can only save XCF through the save menu, changes to other formats pester you about "unsaved changes" even if you do export" design change were over 10:1 against. The brush size slider is a mess. Text editing is broken in about ten different ways, from it forgetting what font size you're typing in to not rendering full text deletion in some cases. The general quality has gone way downhill. Meanwhile, things that have supposedly been "in the works" for years, like higher bit-depth colour, seem further away than ever. Even if I didn't want to export to a higher bit depth, if I want to do a gaussian blur on a high-res image I need to do a combination of dithers and blurs because of the loss of precision at 8 bits per channel.

Facebook is the classic example of terrible product evolution (particularly Messenger... have these people never heard of the concept of screen real estate?). I'd also like to zing Google for Google Maps. Today it's way slower, they took the very convenient full-length zoom bar out (and only put the tiny one in after user complaints), buttons with similar functionality are scattered out (e.g. satellite is on the bottom left, but landscape hidden in the menu top left), photo integration is terrible (no longer shows photos where they actually are, but in a giant "bar" on the bottom of the screen, opened by an ambiguous icon that looks like three different buttons, with lines that point to the map seemingly at random), make you zoom in twice as far to see the same amount of map information (ex. road labels), added icons to the upper right that have no connection to Maps at all just for "product consistency", and so on. And it's 2017, why is their landscape option still so terrible? Even little local companies' map services have vastly superior landscapes.

Comment Re:This is meaningless..... (Score 1) 354

Seriously, that's the best you have, a case from over a decade and a half ago? No country is perfect, but when you have to reach back sixteen years to find something to damn them for., you're really stretching.

World Justice Project (which uses a peer-reviewed methodology to rank judicial systems from around the world; there are over 17 experts just for Sweden alone) ranks Sweden the best in the world in terms of fundamental rights. Their biggest weakness in the rankings? Letting criminals off too easily. But never mind that, because there was a single incident sixteen years ago involving two people who had no legal right to be in the country (versus Assange who has no legal right to *not* be in the country) and who had been misidentified as convicted terrorists being extradited, that means that the whole country is evil and corrupt and just loves to extradite people, right?

Comment Misjargonization (Score 4, Interesting) 352

Referring to software and applications as 'codes' is common in many industries (example "here). People that use such terminology are of much higher than average intelligence.

And so they have even less excuse for their mangling of the terminology, and definitely should be smiled at, nodded to, and ultimately, ignored other than when they have some kind of arbitrary coercive power over you, in which case, do it in your head anyway.

If you walk up to a nuclear engineer with your 140 IQ and ask him to "turn up the atumz", he should probably just call security and have your ass thrown out on the street.

Seriously. If you don't know even the basics of an industry's terminology -- it's time to leave off trying to involve yourself until you get that handled. If you do.

Comment Re:Oops (Score 2) 215

Indeed. There's a lot of skepticism here. When you factor in confounding factors:

Crucially, the association with stroke and dementia disappeared after adjusting for diabetes and vascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure and prior heart attack

The study appears to be an excellent example of the reverse causality effect. For example, let's say I was doing a study on on the effects of taking a heart medication on heart attacks. So I randomly collect thousands of people and study their incidence of heart attacks, and compare which people who had heart attacks were taking a heart medication and which weren't. Lo and behold, the people taking heart medication are far more likely to have a heart attack! Does that mean the medication is to blame? Not at all; it means that the people who are on heart medication are already more likely to be taking heart medication. It's the risk of a heart attack that's causing the taking of heart medication, not the heart medication that's causing the risk of heart attack.

Comment Re:This is meaningless..... (Score 1) 354

Not even the women who are the victims say it was rape.

1) According to the witness statements, SW told several people that she was raped.
2) AA did not, and denied that she was raped.
3) There were only rape charges concerning SW, not AA.

And this isn't an arrest, it's asking questions

Only if you play word games between "anklagad" and "åtalad". The Swedish judicial system, shock of all shock, isn't exactly the same as the US judicial system, and does not break down the concept of charging in exactly the same manner. Regardless, the British court system - at every level - ruled him as considered "charged", under the guidelines of an EAW.

Beyond that, from the sworn statement of the prosecutor herself:

10. Once the interrogation is complete it may be that further questions need to be put to witnesses or the forensic scientists. Subject to any matters said by him, which undermine my present view that he should be indicted, an indictment will be launched with the court thereafter. It can therefore be seen that Assange is sought for the purpose of conducting criminal proceedings and that he is not sought merely to assist with our
enquiries.

Comment Re:That's going to be tought to prosecute (Score 1) 354

As it stands right now, if the US charged him and he were kicked out of the Ecuadorian embassy, the following things would happen:

1) He would be surrendered to Sweden under the EAW, which takes precedence over extradition, and was also the first filing.
2) If tried and convicted in Sweden, he would serve his sentence.
3) Regardless of the outcome in #2, he would then be returned to the UK, as standard in the EAW surrender process (which does not allow for transfer to "third states")
4) He would serve time for skipping out on his house arrest and jumping bail in the UK, as he's already been convicted of that; it postdates the EAW filing but would predate any extradition request.
5) During the events of #1 - #4, the UK court system would rule on the US request. The UK government would also have the right to block the request. Because of brexit, the UK may well drop out of the ECHR; if so, that avenue of appeal would be lost. The US would likely have to guarantee certain standards, likely including no supermax prison, to get the extradition approved.
6) Assuming the extradition is approved, he would be sent to the US, tried, and if convicted, sentenced and serve. The details depend on the exact nature of the charges.

Comment Re: User's need to take responsibility too. (Score 1) 216

I still don't know how to make my mouse feel right, or stop many applications from looking horrible on a retina display.

I want to know what you use on Linux which makes dealing with resolutions and mice easier than a couple of clicks in OS X. If we accept your mouse thing as a realty, I could even follow along with you; however, saying you have applications which don't look ok on a Retina display is something which I simply cannot fathom.

Please explain.

Comment Re:BETRAYAL (Score 5, Informative) 354

Indeed. A Post-ABC poll conducted in 2013 found 22% of Republicans and 38% of Democrats supported punitive strikes against Syria for using chemical weapons. In 2017, under Trump? The number from the Democrats only dropped one point, to 37%, but the number for Republicans totally reversed, to 86% support.

Comment Re:This is meaningless..... (Score 2, Insightful) 354

Another aspect of this: the US can, if they charge him, continually toll the statute of limitations because Assange isn't present. Which means that the charges will remain until Assange dies. Which, if he doesn't leave, will be in the embassy. Also: how many elections do you think Ecuador will have before Assange dies?

The funny thing is, had he just faced up to the charges in Sweden, he would have long since been done with serving his time, then left to the shelter-state of his choice, since Obama never saw fit to charge him. Remember how Assange kept ranting for years about the US having a "secret warrant" out for his arrest? The fact that this is just now happening is proof that there never was one, because you can't charge someone with something that they've already been charged with.

Comment Re:That's going to be tought to prosecute (Score 0) 354

At no time has Assange had a US security clearance. He has no legal obligation to not publish info others have provided. Those others (Bradley Manning, Edward Snowden, etc) are legally liable for leaking information they were legally obligated to protect. Not Assange.

Which is why it had previously been determined that the US couldn't prosecute him, and didn't.

Now, if he was actively involved in the commission of a crime, that's a different story entirely from being handed information. It doesn't matter if you personally didn't have security clearance and weren't the one who walked out with the documents if you plotted and assisted in the action's commission. Just like how it doesn't matter if you weren't the one who robbed a bank and walked out with the cash if you helped arrange the robbery and drove the getaway car.

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