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Comment Re: AT&T (Score 1) 134

Live in a suburban/rural area, travel much and/or want to make sure you've got connectivity wherever you go? Verizon or AT&T are probably a better choice.

I live in a rural area, travel quite a bit (domestically and internationally), and need connectivity wherever I go, and I find Project Fi works better for me than Verizon (haven't tried AT&T). The combination of T-Mobile and Sprint's networks gives me roughly equal coverage to Verizon in the US (there are places I can't get coverage with my Verizon SIM and places I can't get coverage with my Fi SIM, in about equal proportions), and Fi's international coverage is great.

Disclosure: I work for Google (on Android), but that has nothing to do with my use of Fi, other than the fact that I always have a Nexus/Pixel, so I don't have to switch phones to switch carriers.

Comment Re:What's changed? (Score 1) 282

The truth is not a harmful germ.

In the self-selecting petri dish provided by social media, memes evolve for truthiness far more than truthfulness. Your analysis is comprised of about 80% wishful thinking. You need to open your eyes to the actual dynamics of online discussions, rather than just what you think should happen. I long assumed that the unrestricted flow of information was all that was needed to encourage the growth of ideas, the discovery of truth and the exposure and elimination of falsehood. It's become clear that that is not the case.

I don't know what the answer is. Restricting information flow is definitely not the answer. Perhaps poking some holes in the "filter bubbles" (not actually the right term, since the phenomenon isn't caused by personalized search filtering but by personalized group selection, but it's workable) is sufficient, but I doubt it. I think what it's really going to take is for people to self-immunize by learning about memetic evolution. I have no idea how to get people to do that.

Comment Re:Online ? Authors never shopped in real life (Score 2) 112

I thought Waitrose delivered everywhere where they had a large store. Don't they deliver in your area?

For what it's worth, I've had under a dozen substitutions in five years of using Ocado (fewer than I got in any six month period with Tesco before that) and things always come with long shelf lives. They also have excellent customer support and will quickly fix anything that they get wrong.

Comment Re:Online ? Authors never shopped in real life (Score 2) 112

Unfortunately groceries kind of suck online in the UK.

Seriously? Between the major supermarket chains and Ocado all providing online order / home delivery, none of them works for you? I'll admit, I gave up on Tesco repeatedly sending me things that were one day away from their use-by date, but there's a reasonable amount of competition.

Comment Re:It's not just shocking, it's stupid (Score 1) 112

You actually see this on Amazon, where a number of third-party sellers automatically set their prices by querying the Amazon price or the cheapest third-party price and undercutting it slightly. This sometimes leads to amusing effects where two third-party sellers are offering something for 10% less than the cheapest other seller and forget to set a minimum price.

Comment Re: Ontario, largest subnational debtor on the pla (Score -1) 375

Wealth is an abstract concept. In nature noone owns anything

- you own your body if you can protect it. You own your territory if you can protect it. There is no difference between nature and us, we are nature.

If you don't own anything then why would you mind if I decided to kill you for food (don't worry, I am a vegetarian, but I may sell your body to others for food). So you see, your property starts with possession of your own body and mind and from there it extends to the work that you do in your life because that work takes your personal time, the time of your life.

Your work is time taken out of your life that you are spending not on pleasure but on work (maybe your work is pleasure for you but that doesn't really change anything). To take what you have worked for and to distribute it to others, who did not do this work is the injustice of oppression imposed by the collectivism that we are observing here and the more of that is happening the more people will fight against it in every possible way.

I am all for people outsourcing, automating, avoiding and evading every tax they can because that is the fight against the oppression and violence of the collectivist mob and it needs to be done.

Comment Re:Vigorous debate? Surely you jest (Score -1) 375

I've been on this site since around 1998, registered the account within a couple of years I think. As an anarcho capitalist/objectivist I don't see what it is you are seeing (this site becoming more libertarian minded, which means less Statist, less collectivist). For whatever reason the population here is quite happy to be part of a 'larger than self' collective and it's quite happy to use collectivism for protectionism, for taxation and redistribution and such. Where have you seen this shift towards 'Randian garbage' as you call it? Individuals are mostly drowned out in the overall collectivist noise here.

Comment Re:Privacy (Score 1) 74

I'm guessing that sure, a lot of folks wouldn't care, but I would posit that the majority of the populace using social media even is NOT aware of the massive information collection going on, nor how it is used.

I doubt the difference is awareness so much as caring. Germany, in particular, is extremely sensitive to privacy reasons. What's more interesting is why the populace of some countries care so much more than others. German motivations seem obvious... but Russians would seem to have almost as much motivation and they're heavy users of social media.

Comment Re:Why is this surprising? (Score 1) 74

Gabbing, food-plate moneyshots, selfie-admiration and laughing at animals does not necessarily lead to productivity.

You're implying a causal relationship, which is contradicted by the existence of many other high-performing economies -- including the most productive countries -- that do have heavy social media usage.

Comment Re:This reminds me of the nuclear boy scout story. (Score 1) 178

Actually, I meant what I said.

Then you're just wrong, because decisions like this guy made have basically nothing to do with any sort of intelligence, and certainly not social intelligence (not by any definition of that phrase that I've ever seen). They do have something to do with motivation, but it's about the goal of the motivation, not the degree.

It's perfectly possible to have high intelligence across every category, including social intelligence, and still be foolish.

While this may be true, I think it is impossible to anticipate someone's actual social reasoning performance from any measure of social reasoning capacity to any useful degree.

Likely true, but irrelevant.

Comment Re:Wow. (Score 1) 178

Yes Sir, that's another one of our great hits! Between you me and the fence post, we're also looking into commissioning a pilot for a new show called NCIS:Cyber, featuring the Naval Criminal Intelligence agencies that protect our brave Marines from hackers.

Also, I don't know if you like to laugh (who doesn't?) but we're looking for some top notch comedy writers for our humorous look at the "science" world, The Big Bang Theory. If you think you have what it takes, and are familiar with the kinds of shows nerds watch, like The Star Trek, and Firebug, send us your resume and some samples of your work, and maybe you can join our writing team!

- LM

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