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Comment Re:Init alternatives (Score 1) 82

I'm not sure if that's a serious question or an attempt to troll, but regardless...

Speed is not why you should want (or not) systemd. It's Linux. How often do you expect to reboot the thing, anyway?

In the spirit of "Do one thing and do it well", systemd's goal is "manage services and dependencies". To that end, the only real interaction you normally have with systemd is to start or stop a service, and view the associated logs if some service is misbehaving. In my opinion, them, I don't really see the point in changing one's distro (including support lifecycles, development trust, and organization philosophy) just to swap out init. It's just not that big a deal.

It most certainly is if you manage servers!

Most performance evaluations include an uptime requirement. Most businesses it is 99.97% uptime while some Slashdot readers it might be as high as 99.99% or 99.9999% if they work at Amazon or a Wall Street trading firm where any downtime costs millions a minute.

If servers randomly do things behind your back or you restart one during a standard change and it doesn't come back up and your change window is between 1am - 3am (like my employer) you can be in hot water if you can't get it back up if something weird happens during a patch or other activity. SystemD's benefit is it's downfall which is that is event driven. Let's say theoretically you can have SystemD launch tasks or do something in the event your network is hacked or if one of the NIC teaming cards fail. That sounds cool. Problem is if it fails and does something that crashes it.

I am learning FreeBSD now more after I stopped touching it in awhile. Sometimes boring but predictable non event oriented boot only procedures are bah but predictable and nice. You know what you are going to get. It's in that ugly RC script hack but hey you can debug it!

Comment Re: What a stupid question (Score 1) 479

Sure, there's always a subpoena (or more likely an NSL), but before it gets to that point Trump will need to have passed some form of legislation to actually get the database off the ground and into reality, and that's going to require a considerable amount of support from Congress, Senates and (almost certainly) the courts, because you just know this would get challenged in multiple jurisdications and head towards the SCOTUS. Or, I suppose, he could maybe try and do it off the books through one of the three letter agencies and a whole bunch of NSLs, in which case the US is absolutely done as "The Land of the Free" and we'll just have to repeal Godwin because the Nazi Germany / Stasi comparisons will be absolutely justified in that eventuality.

Having multiple parties whose co-operation would be useful, if not essential, to making the project viable basically stating up-front they don't support the idea and will almost certainly challenge any data requests through the courts, again likely all the way to SCOTUS, just as Apple recently did with a certain iPhone is quite likely to undermine at least some of that support. If there's one thing you can particularly count on politicians for, and especially so in Trump's case, is not wanting to back a losing horse, so the less likely the project is to succeed the more likely it is to be stillborn, and that's the best way for it to be.

Besides, since we're entirely talking about hypotheticals here, if Twitter were to do a Lavabit how is TheRealDonaldTrump going to get MSM to jump and report any <140 character bit of random thought as front-page news? ;-)

Comment Re:What a stupid question (Score 1) 479

Build the (still hypothetical) database, not so much. Help *populate* it though? Twitter, like all social media companies, undoubtedly has a lot of data on its users, and that data is going to include stuff that would help identify someone as a Muslim, even if it's just "Went to Mosque today..." type tweets. Think about how this (again, hypothetically) might work - voluntary registration first (the most harmless), mandatory registration second (the weaker-willed protestors to add to low-grade watch lists), then a trawl for those that didn't register (the activists and other "red flags" for the high-grade watch lists... and beyond). Care to guess where Twitter et al in the social media/data gathering trade come into that?

It's absolutely the pointy end, and hypothetical as the question might be "No comment" doesn't even come close to the correct answer of a completely unequivocal "Fuck, no!", so kudos to Twitter for being the only company with the balls to do the right thing. Hopefully, they'll still have those balls should they actually have to follow though on that position.

Comment Re:Because it's not software (Score 2) 104

I thought Henry Ford was a visionary because of his business model -- an assembly line that could mass produce cars for everyone -- not because he necessarily innovated the automobile concept itself.

Musk's advancement mostly seems in the electric drivetrain, less so in the business model. He wants to do direct sales, but while it runs against the grain of the existing car sales business, existing regulation and low production volume make it appear less than revolutionary, especially when many products are sold directly buy their maker.

Comment Re: Why is this guy still talking (Score 1) 439

Less hours and more free time drastically reduces the value of your labor. Since MBA cost accountants figure overhead as fixed + variable costs it makes sense to fire you and overwork the other guy.

During the recession everyone worked 70 to 80 hours a week or 0. You just have one guy do the work of the laid off one or get rid of the secretaries and assistants or lead scouts and place the burden on the other guy ... And still expect same numbers.

Time is never reduced ever

Comment Re:You should *NOT* be projecting.... (Score 1) 60

I think there are fair arguments about not distracting other drivers. But one thing nice about this vs. a HUD is that it actually projects imagery onto the surface you're supposedly to be looking at -- you want to focus on the road in front of you generally so seeing directional markings there is completely natural and doesn't require a change in visual focus or the distraction of having to look through a HUD's imagery to the road beyond.

Some potential ideas to make is less distracting for others -- don't display markings when another car is within a distance where they may easily see them, display markings such that they're oriented/displayed in a way meaningful to other drivers or communicate that they should be ignored. I drive through intersections many times a day with turn arrows and lane markings not relevant to me and I don't get confused.

I also wonder if there's some way of projecting them with a light color, pattern or polarization that's made more visible by filters laminated into the originating car's windshield, especially if it managed to do it such that other cars windshields acted as passive filters due to their polarization.

I think it's a great way to put information exactly where it belongs for driver visual focus. Distraction to other motorists *could* be a problem, but overall people are already visually attuned to ignore markings that are backwards or don't apply to them and their direction of travel. Roads have all kinds of markings already and nobody complains about excess street markings. And it may be possible to project them in a way that makes it difficult for other drivers to see them at all.

Comment Re:As soon as we get a legitimate source like Netf (Score 1) 69

Right, but most people aren't students, and $10/month for access to a library the size of Netflix is still vastly cheaper than buying everything a typical subscriber might watch there the way you had to before the streaming library services were around.

I might also wonder what anyone who is watching enough stuff to need $60+/month of subscriptions to that many different services at once is actually doing with their lives, but that's a different question.

Comment Re:Better up the Military Budget (Score 1) 304

A wall won't stop them, but it will slow them down enough for people behind the wall to shoot them dead.

Don't be naive, if refugee/migration pressures are this severe do not think of a second that the people with will demand the invading hordes without be stopped by any means necessary.

I'm of the opinion that it's happening already. We argue around the margins about immigration, pretending it's about jobs, racism or some other bullshit but I think at the heart of it people really are nervous about long-term resource access. It's low level and you can easily rationalize away any kind of urgency about it, but I think the level of news coverage about refugees into Europe, the noticeable increase in Hispanic populations in the US over the last 10-20 years, etc is invoking something of a panic mindset.

We laugh about Trump's wall now for all the obvious reasons but it wouldn't surprise me at all if fortifying the border specifically against mass refugee influxes doesn't become something more than a fringe idea.

Submission + - Social media is not your friend

Presto Vivace writes: Of 8 Tech Companies, Only Twitter Says It Would Refuse to Help Build Muslim Registry for Trump

The Intercept contacted nine of the most prominent such firms, from Facebook to Booz Allen Hamilton, to ask if they would sell their services to help create a national Muslim registry, an idea recently resurfaced by Donald Trump’s transition team. Only Twitter said no.

Comment Re:Define "fit for business" (Score 1) 117

If we were talking about updates to the Enterprise version of 7 or 8.1, which organisations might already have deployed widely, presumably it would be tougher for those organisations to justify the switch. Maybe only those who were concerned about serious legal/regulatory issues would do so. But then in that situation, the sysadmins could just block the other updates they didn't want, so concerns about updates introducing ads or removing features or whatever don't really apply.

The thing with Windows 10 is that it's a big upgrade anyway. Enterprise-scale IT departments are already going to need plans for a full migration if they want to go to Win 10 Enterprise. They're already going to have to check compatibility with all the software they rely on, maybe upgrade some of their hardware, and so on. So the cost of accepting Windows 10 if Microsoft were also to push stuff like telemetry and automatic updates in the Enterprise edition would just be that much higher.

Comment Re:New Normal (Score 1) 33

What's new about it? This is the same FUBAR cluelessness we should be used by now from large consumer ISPs like TalkTalk (who also run the Post Office ISP network), although I thought KCom knew better - maybe they've lost the cluefullness they had when they first set up and were at the cutting edge of high-speed broadband. The only reason this was a problem for them was because they thought it was a good idea to provide their customers with routers with the remote admin ports active and exposed to the Internet at large. Now, the first part of that (the remote admin) is fair enough; we are talking mass-market consumer ISPs here, so being able to remotely push firmware and other updates out to the CPE is generally a good idea, but just *how* long has it been best current practice to restrict access to admin ports to known and trusted IPs again? Defence in depth stuff like that was the "done thing" back when I was working at an ISP in early 2000s, FFS. It's not hard, and there are multiple implementation options; you can do so in your internal distribution network somewhere, you can do it on the edge, by pushing out some sane rules to the devices internal firewall, or (better still) a combination of more than one of the above, but there's simply no excuse for not doing it at all, especially after the last decade and change of major Internet worms.

Comment Re:DEA already has rescheduled and overruled itsel (Score 1) 146

I'm on board with most of that, but if economics was a good enough explanation we wouldn't have seen the DEA making opiates much harder to obtain -- more intensive prescription databases to get doctor shoppers, more intensive audits of prescribing physicians, and the rescheduling of hydrocodone from III to II. The irony, of course, is that it has jacked up street prices and moved many low-level pill users accustomed to uniform dosing to street heroin, which despite DEA enforcement has become cheaper than made-in-the-USA pills, and with all the worse addiction and overdose outcome you'd expect.

I'm more inclined to think that the DEA was largely a political creation designed to attack the counterculture of its founding era, using criminalization of LSD and marijuana as an excuse for law enforcement action. This I think goes a long way towards explaining the DEAs aggressive moves against any substance with recreational value.

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