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Comment Re:We have K&R on PDF (Score 1) 135

Even if you did, it strikes me that this is an absurd metric. Since a lot of C development goes on within communities; either closed source shops, or open source projects, where it's likely only a portion of the mailing list archives, if any of them at all, are archived. The majority of the BSD and Linux kernels are written in C, along with a significant percentage of the toolsets, so clearly there's one helluva lot of C coding going on. Whether search engines index that activity or not is irrelevant.

A better metric, though not perfect, would be to look at the activity in places like Git, to see how many lines of code roughly are in any given language.

Comment Re:problems, lol (Score 1) 135

Or, you know. You could actually learn how to write good code at the most powerful level. That's a radical thought.

I did, and that's why I'm using Python. I'm capable of writing web services in C, but who the hell's got time for that craziness? Also consider Amdahl's Law: in most of stuff I write, the "running code to process data" bit is a teensy portion of wall clock time. Much more is spent in socket handshaking or waiting for database queries to finish. Out of a 50ms request lifecycle, perhaps 1ms is spent inside a box that I have complete control of. Even if I rewrote it in assembler (C is for high-level pansies) to be 1000x faster, the request would still take 49.001ms. An assload of work porting security-sensitive code into an untyped languages so that the end result can be 2% faster? Yeah, no. My boss would fire me with a quickness if I proposed that.

I'd be much more likely to rewrite performance-critical code in Go or Rust. They're as fast as C but without the death of a thousand cuts like gotofail waiting to ruin your careful planning. Life's too short to waste it hacking in languages that hate you and make you want to look incompetent.

Comment Re:EC will punish US Teachers (Score 1) 149

One of the largest Apple shareholders is Vanguard Funds, and Vanguard Funds are owned by multiple 401k and pension plans in USA. Bottom line is that not only teachers, but many in the middle class will lose a boatload of money because European Commission, directed by unelected president Junker TOLD Ireland to change treatment of Ireland's laws and to extort more money.

401k plans were never meant to provide retirement for people. They were just meant to funnel money to people who already have all the money.

The total percentage of Vanguard instruments that are owned by the middle class is probably in the 1%-2% range. And Vanguard's total Apple exposure is in the 2%-3% range (at least according to the Vanguard statements). This bill for back taxes isn't going to move the needle one bit for anyone in the "middle class".

Comment Don't pay attention and die (Score 1) 98

"The system will disengage if you ignore those warnings for too long. Electrek reports"

So if you're not paying attention then suddenly you may go careening out of control. I'm not judging this as a good or bad solution to get the driver to participate, but it's the reality. How many people will think they can get away with this (as a couple Tesla owners already do) and then suddenly be in an accident that the autopilot could have avoided if it didn't decide to turn itself off to penalize the driver?

In any case hopefully this works as intended and doesn't leave participating drivers in an unexpected situation.

Comment Re: good luck with that one... (Score 1) 172

It remains the case that the law was brought down because of arguments about incompatibility with the current EU rules. Had those EU rules not applied, there would have been no basis for the issues raised in the judicial review. The legal technicalities of the judicial review process don't change that fundamental situation, nor does the lack (so far) of a CJEU reference.

Also yes, lots of other Member States have private copying exceptions, but most of them caved to industry pressure and introduced some sort of levy on their citizens in return. Those levies have been widely criticised, both for increasing prices of media and devices even where they would not subsequently be used for private copying purposes and for the manner in which the proceeds of those levies were distributed. If you read the EU resolution you linked yourself, you'll find it's extremely careful about the wording around that exception and it most certainly does not imply that the UK's private copying exception would be reinstated on the original basis or that similar levies should not be applied in the UK.

Comment Station wagon full of DvDs (Score 1) 62

I think what they are saying is they are going to screw with your latency and data rate such that an HD movie will stutter and an SD will play.

Basically, they are going to give you unlimited bandwidth in the same sense that a station wagon full of dvds is unlimited bandwidth. Yes there's a very very long latency but when the wagon arrives the delta function is so large that if occupies the entire spectrum. Voila unlimited data with unlimited bandwidth, very high latentcy

Comment Re:Unsustainable pricing on high tech gadgets (Score 1) 98

It doesn't cost $800 to manufacture an iPhone. More like $100. In the US it would maybe be $150. It is Apples greed that is the blame.

There are always lines around the block on launch day. People cheerfully buy tens of millions of each iPhone. If people are willing to pay that price without a gun to their head, and there are alternatives that they could buy instead but they choose to buy iPhones anyway, how do you justify describing it as greed?

Comment varmint (Score 3, Funny) 452

Jennifer Youngman, a 65-year-old woman living in rural northern Virginia shot down a drone flying over her property with a single shotgun blast.

She was later quoted as saying, "And I boilt that dern thing for nearly two hours and it never did get tender none. My husband, Cousin Carl, damn near broke a tooth."

Comment I Spy (Score 0) 452

Bull's Eye in the Sky!

United States vs. Causby was decided in '46. Before drones and camera technology had advanced to the point where it became trivial to surveil private property at distances of a couple hundred feet. That decision is about as relevant as the loophole that allows banks to create money out of thin air when issuing a loan because the letter of the law from the 1800s applies only to printed money. Southern ladies apparently know the constitution (4th Amendment) and the range of #7.5 shot (> 500' at sea level).

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