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Comment Re:Maybe just profit taking? (Score 1) 296

> The ignorance of looking at a 24 hour 17% drop vs a 300% 12 month raise is astounding. I would think most people who understand financial markets would not be this ignorant to call this a "crash"

You think wrong. For *any* asset type a 17% drop in 24hrs is most definitely a crash.

Comment Re:"The app was never a revenue driver..." (Score 2, Informative) 59

the difference between revenue and profit has absolutely nothing to do with being a "finance weasel". it is financial jargon, and a basic one at that.

do you really mean to imply that failing to understand the distinction between a monitor and a CPU is protecting yourself from IT weasel-words?

Comment Re:I have my Nexus 5 about 2 years (Score 1) 116

> Apple is doing the same and now it's doing it with the Macs.

Interesting you say that. After the disappointing release price of Pixel XL, the next phone I'm buying will likely be an iPhone --- their support for old phones lasts 5 years. From what I can tell, iPhones have the longest, most robust support of any of the phones on the market.

Pixel & Pixel XL is promised 2 years of support and a 3rd year of security fixes. ...for $650 & $750? no thank you!

Submission + - Driving Force Behind Alkali Metal Explosions Discovered (nature.com)

Kunedog writes: Years ago, Dr. Philip E. Mason (aka Thunderf00t on Youtube) found it puzzling that the supposedly "well-understood" explosive reaction of a lump of sodium (an alkali metal) dropped in water could happen at all, given such a limited contact area on which the reaction could take place. And indeed, sometimes an explosion did fail to reliably occur, the lump of metal instead fizzing around the water's surface on a pocket of hydrogen produced by the (slower than explosive) reaction, thus inhibiting any faster reaction of the alkali metal with the water. Mason's best hypothesis was that the (sometimes) explosive reactions must be triggered by a Coulomb explosion, which could result when sodium cations (positive ions) are produced from the reaction and expel each other further into the water.

This theory is now supported by photographic and mathematical evidence, published in the journal Nature Chemistry. In a laboratory at Braunschweig University of Technology in Germany, Mason and other chemists used a high-speed camera to capture the critical moment that makes an explosion inevitable: a liquid drop of sodium-potassium alloy shooting spikes into the water, dramatically increasing the reactive interface. They also developed a computer simulation to model this event, showing it is best explained by a Coulomb explosion.

The Youtube video chronicles the evolution the experimental apparatuses underwent over time, pursuant to keeping the explosions safe, contained, reliable, and visible.

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