Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Wall Street's greatest enemy: The man who knows too much (salon.com)

anlashok writes: A successful high-level executive for 30 years, he has been embroiled in seven years of lawsuits with Countrywide and the company that bought it, Bank of America. His determination to speak out against multiple violations of law at Countrywide earned him retaliation, and eventually, he was frozen out of corporate boardrooms, unable to find a new job. He won a jury verdict in his case, but after two and a half more years of fighting, an appellate court reversed the ruling in highly unusual circumstances.

“I keep hearing about whistle-blower protections,” he tells Salon, exasperatedly. “It certainly didn’t happen for me.”

Now, Bank of America wants to gouge Michael Winston one last time, demanding an interest payment on money awarded to him that he never received.

“Thus far, the person who did the right thing got punished, and the person who did the wrong thing got rewarded,” Winston said. The chilling case shows that the greatest enemy for Wall Street is the man or woman who actually tries to expose its secrets.

Submission + - US manufacturing adds only $4 to handset costs .. (theregister.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Motorola has been heavily marketing the "Made in the USA" credentials of the Moto X, and is assembling the handsets in its Fort Worth, Texas facility. Doing so allows the company to customize handsets individually for each customer and ship them out within four days of ordering. IHS estimates this adds around $4 extra to Motorola's costs, but makes the company more responsive and brings PR benefits.

Submission + - Companies Petition Congress to Reform 'Business Method' Patent Process (opensource.com)

ectoman writes: This week, a coalition of more than 40 companies sent a letter to Congress asking for legislation that expands the Covered Business Method (CBM) program, a move some feel would stem patent abuse in the United States. Expanding the scope of CBM—a program that grants the Patent and Trademark Office the power to challenge the validity of certain business methods patents—would expedite the patent review process and significantly cut litigation costs, they say. "The vague and sweeping scope of many business method claims covering straight forward, common sense steps has led to an explosion of patent claims against processes used every day in common technologies by thousands of businesses and millions of Americans," says the letter, signed by companies like Amazon, Netflix, Red Hat, Macy's, and Kroger).

Submission + - BitTorrent offers just $500 as reward for a finding that could have destroyed it (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Person going by pseudonym MentaL has made public his findings from earlier this year and has revealed how he stumbled upon an unsecured Jenkins panel of BitTorrent and how he was offered a lousy $500 in return. MentaL had before him almost every bit of information about BitTorrent starting from source code of all software owned by the company to financial data. The RaGEZone admin said that he had "master keys to everything, including DNS level material” and after reviewing the information on his hand, he concluded “it was in the best interest to notify the company immediately.” He said that even though he was offered a reward in return nothing has come his way till today and when he contacted the company for his dues, he was asked for an invoice amounting $500.
Biotech

Submission + - Most popular human cell in science gets sequenced (nature.com)

ananyo writes: "The research world’s most famous human cell has had its genome decoded, and it’s a mess. German researchers this week report the genome sequence of the HeLa cell line, which originates from a deadly cervical tumor taken from a patient named Henrietta Lacks (Slashdot has previously noted a film made about the cells and there's a recent mutli-award winning book on Lacks). Established the same year that Lacks died in 1951, HeLa cells were the first human cells to grow well in the laboratory. The cells have contributed to more than 60,000 research papers, the development of a polio vaccine in the 1950s and, most recently, an international effort to characterize the genome, known as ENCODE. The team's work shows that HeLa cells contain one extra version of most chromosomes, with up to five copies of some, and raises further questions over the widespread use of HeLa cells as models for human cell biology."

Submission + - Is it worth trying to go back to work for an ex-employer

tw3ak writes: I used to a work for a global company for about 4 years as a Senior Support Analyst right after graduating from college. Amazing job, amazing people, great environment. Unfortunantely my boss and I did not see eye to eye on somethings and we decided it was best to part ways and move along. Well its been 10 years and lots of experience later and personal changes have occured to make me a different person than I was at that point ( learned to see the big picture).... I would love to apply back to this company however I am concerned that my past might create an issue. Now the company I worked for at the time was purchased by another company so I am not sure if that would play into things at all.. Looking for some advice from the slashdot community.
Intel

Submission + - Apple and Intel discussing partnership regarding A-series processor production (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple has for a while now been in a thorny predicament given its relationship with Samsung. On one hand, Samsung supplies all of the processors that power Apple's wildly profitable lineup of iOS devices. And yet, on the other hand, Samsung has quickly emerged as Apple's chief competitor in the smartphone space. What's more, Apple has accused Samsung of "slavishly copying" Apple's own products and innovations instead of coming up with its own. Consequently, the two companies are currently engaged in a slew of intellectual property lawsuits across the globe.

That said, it's no secret that Apple is actively seeking to lessen its reliance on Samsung. It's been rumored for a while that Apple is hoping to move its AX processor production to TSMC sometime in the near future. And now comes a report that Apple has also engaged in discussions with Intel whereby they would become a significant supplier of Apple's A-series processors.

Security

Submission + - Twitter OAuth API Keys Leaked (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: The OAuth keys and secrets that official Twitter applications use to access users’ Twitter accounts have been leaked in a post to Github this morning. The consumer keys and secrets, which function similarly to a username and password, were posted for Twitter for iPhone, Android, iPad, Mac, Windows Phone and TweetDeck. Unapproved third-party applications can now use these secrets to impersonate legitimate third-party apps and circumvent any access control measures Twitter has in place for unofficial apps.
Programming

Submission + - HTML5 Security Isn't (hp.com)

Esther Schindler writes: "Because HTML5 is largely used to build applications, security concerns are paramount. Consider banking, for example, where extremely private information must be kept as such. But the use of HTML5 features without a significant amount of thought behind them can leave customer data exposed. Molly Holzschlag discusses the types of HTML5 features which cause significant concerns in HTML5 security and provides a basic guide to identify which areas of a site or portions of an application can benefit from these features, and those that can cause risk."
Microsoft

Submission + - Windows 8 boots too fast: this is a bad thing? (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: "Microsoft claims that Windows 8 can boot in as few as seven seconds. Microsoft says this isn't necessarily a good thing, especially if you need to interrupt the boot. Apparently things boot so quickly there isn't even enough time to detect keystrokes such as F2 or F8 according to Microsoft's Chris Clark. Clark states that Microsoft will not cut the fast boot time to preserve keystrokes but has come up with some other ways to provide the same functionality.

Windows 8 now has a boot options menu that contains all of the troubleshooting tools, developer-focused options for Windows startup, methods for accessing the firmware's BIOS setup and a method for booting to other devices. This boot options menu lives in a realm that is called WinRE (Windows Recovery Environment).

There are also command line options for accessing the boot menu through shutdown.exe and an "Advanced Startup" option in general settings."

News

Submission + - Tasers Can Kill, Says American Heart Association (ibtimes.com) 1

redletterdave writes: "Roughly 16,000 police agencies around the world use Tasers, but only because they can subdue unruly people in a non-lethal, non-violent way. However, a new study released by the American Heart Association's journal "Circulation" provides scientific, peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary. Dr. Douglas Zipes, professor emeritus at Indiana University's Krannert Institute of Cardiology, discovered that a simple Taser shock "can cause cardiac electric capture and provoke cardiac arrest," since the electrical current can create uncontrolled, fluttering heart contractions and abnormally rapid heartbeats. In eight case studies of the Taser X26 ECD — one of the most commonly used Taser models with police agencies — seven of the people died."

Submission + - Rasberry Pi competitors appearing. (bbc.co.uk)

clickclickdrone writes: A couple of competitors to the Rasberry Pi have been in the news this week. The Chinese MK802 has a higher spec but an equally high price but now VIA have announced their own bare board system, the APC which should ship at $49. Both systems run Android in contrast to the Rasberry Pi's Linux.

Submission + - FBI Cellphone Tracking Techniques Revealed (wsj.com)

glittermage writes: The WSJ reports on an ongoing case regarding alleged "Hacker" Daniel David Rigmaiden regarding the governments tools used to track mobile devices with or without a warrant. The Judge may allow Daniel to defend himself against the governments claims by putting the technology into the light. Sounds good to me.
Security

Submission + - SourceForge.net Passwords Reset (sourceforge.net)

sticks_us writes: Providing a model for responsible security practices (unlike a certain other recent example), this weekend SourceForge did the right thing. All registered users received this email early this morning:

We recently experienced a directed attack on SourceForge infrastructure (http://sourceforge.net/blog/sourceforge-net-attack/) and so we are resetting all passwords in the sf.net database — just in case.

Our investigation uncovered evidence of password sniffing attempts. We have no evidence to suggest that the sniffing attempt was completed successfully. But, what we definitely don’t want is to find out in 2 months that passwords were compromised and we didn’t take action.
So, we’ve invalidated all sourceforge.net account passwords, and to access the site again, everyone will need to go through the email recovery process and choose a shiny new password.

Slashdot Top Deals

"We want to create puppets that pull their own strings." -- Ann Marion "Would this make them Marionettes?" -- Jeff Daiell

Working...