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Comment Re:MAGA (Score 1) 55

SMH -- I am neither right wing (I am libertarian, anti-statist) and as my posts clearly show, rather the opposite of racist. I do have a long history but it's of wisdom distributed to help the lost such as yourself, but I can only take you so far and the rest of the journey is up to you.

I will leave the last response to you, here here on your path is your own. Choose well!

Comment Re:MAGA (Score 1) 55

How am I the racist in pointing out how the black community is being taken advantage of? It seems pretty sure the real racists are the ones who harm the black community while claiming to support them. That's some Deep Racism right there.

I'm just trying to help by point out the obvious so some in the community can become Awake, rather than just Woke.

Comment Welcome to the Osborne Effect (Score 4, Interesting) 26

For those not up on computer history, Osborne was a computer maker that announced a great new model coming in a year... so sales started tanking while people waited... which meant there was no model in a year (or maybe there was, my memory is fuzzy on that detail).

I think MS was really dumb to try and compete with the PS4 Pro by saying they would have improved hardware next year. All they had to do was literally nothing, the PS4 Pro is not big enough of a bump that it would have effected XBox sales...

Although really it seems like XBox sales have been lagging even before the recent hardware upgrade was announced.

Comment Re:MAGA (Score 1, Troll) 55

You do know that he only "cares" about blacks and unemployed to piss of the liberals, right?

If true that would be one step ahead of liberals, who actively farm black people like cattle (or those Matrix pods) for votes but don't care about the condition they live in. After all since blacks vote almost all democrats you can abuse them as much as you like and it just doesn't matter.

See: Chicago.

Comment Re: That doesn't change anything (Score 1) 109

I think the legality of it is by far the tricker part, almost all of the technical challenges are very close to being solved. But the benefit is so huge to most commuters that demand will be through the roof in a way you have not ever seen before in your lifetime.

If you think about how much time most people spend commuting and the ability to turn that time for every single person into something they can do that is fun instead of stress... that is beyond huge.

Comment Re:Why not name him? (Score 1) 114

If you assume an ex-prisoner will commit crimes again, your prison system isn't working.

At least in the U.S., it's a good bet that a criminal will re-commit. This may be a sign that the prison system isn't working, but it doesn't change the fact that we have a recidivism rate of over 50% in the first year after release alone.

That said, if we don't give "rehabilitated" convicts the benefit of the doubt after "paying their debt," we're pretty much guaranteeing that they'll have to return to crime. Convicts do need the ability to escape their criminal past.

Comment But we don't have a capitalist system (Score 1) 536

America operates under a fascist economic model of strong collusion between the business elites and government, striving for a two class system - elites and laborers.

We utilize intellectual property laws, courts, legislation, etc to control markets. But even worse, the application of those regulations are often very one sided.

Comment Absolutely true... (Score 1) 536

And there is a HUGE difference between a "degree" and experience.

I am not really a Java developer, more a Java "script" kiddie. But I am no longer surprised, when I turn to an H1B hired for a Java position to discover they are more clueless than I am. It's very common.

Also, I've learned during interviewing that it is not uncommon for half the credentials to boil down to they took a 2 week program or completed an online tutorial. And that there is actually zero business experience for stated skill.

Comment New senses? (Score 1) 122

Elliot Freeman, a cognitive neuroscientist at City University and the study's lead author, said: "A lot of us go around having senses that we do not even recognise."

It seems to me more like a short circuit between regions of the brain than a different sense. I wouldn't like to hear things that aren't there just because I'm seeing things. It's well known that there are substantial interactions between different regions of the brain, which is why for example we turn down the stereo while trying to find an address.

Comment The Irony (Score 2) 52

Qualcomm has patents on actual products, technologies, and methods they have developed. The view of the Federal government is that they are in violation of anti-trust laws.

Yet, Apple who had patents on flat rectangular device, gride arrangement of icons, etc. Gets billions of dollars for having absolutely zero technology infringed. Go figure....

Comment Re:Some places are impossible. (Score 1) 51

Sounds like an awesome idea.

In the presence of a working public transportation system that actually met the needs of inhabitants, it might be. But we have that in maybe one or two cities in the USA, and actually, if you took the cars away the systems couldn't handle the load. Toll roads are harmful to business and individuals alike. We make use of the road network free to enable commerce and free travel.

I am an outspoken proponent of PRT and of ordinary rail for longer distances, but barring their existence, I'm extremely opposed to placing more restrictions on people's ability to travel. What year is it? Let's figure out how to let people travel efficiently.

Comment Re:Just what we need (Score 1) 109

For every (likely made up) story you have about how your father's uncle's brother's first cousin's roommate had a union job and it was full of lazy people

I had a student job with a community college while I went there only about a decade ago, while I uh, pivoted. And what I saw in the IT department was tragic. The primary system upon which the school depended was a HP-SUX quad Alpha, because that's what their software runs on. Then they replaced it with some ridiculously expensive many-way itanic box because that's what the vendor told them to do. On the old system, I got paid to implement ssh tunneling (with putty, naturally) to stop them from sending SSNs and other private student information across internet links in cleartext, because the sysadmin they were paying to do this stuff couldn't figure it out. Then I got paid to figure out how to implement ipsec on the new machine because the guy whose job that is couldn't manage that either. I was hoping to slide into that job but that guy bought a second Harley, and he had to stick around to pay for it. Or more to the point, so that the students and taxpayer could pay for it. He certainly didn't earn the money. My boss was quite competent, that was nice. My two coworkers were also competent, but lazy. I wound up doing job after job that they were supposed to do, because they didn't bother. One of them had severe short-timer's syndrome for the entire two-year span we were both there, with a countdown clock to retirement. He was a pro at stretching jobs out and making them take forever. He probably should have had a 75% pay cut.

Meanwhile, administrators have a different union from educators. This results in administrators and their favored assistants being paid dramatically more than the educators... you know, education? The point of the whole place?

I don't know if unions are as toxic in other industries as they are in education, but they're definitely a massive part of the problem with education today.

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