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Comment Re: It's pretty simple (Score 1) 240

General Welfare is nebulous at best. It is used to describe just about anything someone wants, from Energy Star to just about every social welfare program that has become an Entitlement. Not sure how "Promote" becomes "Entitled" in perpetuity.

The odd thing is, we can't even begin to end programs that have long since served their purposes. Energy Star was great idea, but no longer has any meaning. As I pointed out, it has done nothing to curtail the greater energy sucking Vampires (LED clocks) that are plugged into every outlet of my house. Because my toaster needs a clock.

Comment Re:Another outrage article (Score 0) 240

Except that this program actually got companies "in line"

Got "in line" with what? It is just another label people ignore.

The thing of it is, that energy efficiency doesn't matter once you bought the thing that has its "Energy Star " sticker on it. Nobody calculates that the Fridge you bought 20 years ago is actually costing you money, because its energy usage is twice as much as what is available now. The new "Energy Star" stickered Fridge is twice as efficient as your "Energy Star" stickered Fridge in your kitchen. Most people think they are the same sticker, meaning the same thing "energy efficient" and relative efficiency is nothing but "fancy math stuff"

And "Energy Star" has done nothing to reduce the vampire energy loss due to everything having a damn clock in it, and the blue LED lightbulb, slowly sucking power unknown and unseen because, like the waste in federal spending, it is so small as to simply be an "rounding error".

So, I reject the idea that it is "in line" with anything actually useful, like forcing people to get rid of their 2nd (3rd) Fridge sitting in the Garage, from 30 years ago, which still has the "This unit costs $20 year to operate" Energy Star Sticker still on it. Even though it is more like $20 / month now, 30 years later.

Comment Re:It's pretty simple (Score 1) 240

I would feel fine, if you could specified exactly what you want to cut. But unlike what you're protesting (you are) isn't actually something defined constitutionally as a function of Federal Government, Defense spending actually is one of the items specifically mentioned ...

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity ...

Not that it matters to people anymore.

Comment Re:Another outrage article (Score -1, Troll) 240

The Energy Star program costs almost nothing. There are zero government employees actually testing products.

Then, almost by definition, it is worthless. Does nothing, cost nothing and yet people are whining about it disappearing. Do you see the problem yet? Do you even begin to realize that the whole thing is a sham / scam feel good "But the evil _______ are cutting this valuable program!" anytime someone wants to remove it?

And there are thousands such programs with little more than nothing useful, but we can't cut them without some bleeding heart trotting out some anecdotal case.

Comment Re:Define Absolutely Necessary (Score 1) 240

Please define absolutely necessary.

Those proposing regulations should be able to explain what is "absolutely necessary" about their regulations, and let people decide for themselves. What we don't need are self important people telling us what is absolutely necessary just to regulate something.

I am really sure that most regulations and such start out with the best of intentions. But what I do know is that every time an edge case comes along, those regulations get expanded, to the point of ridiculousness. After all, we have to shut down that kids lemonade stand because it violates some health code somewhere.

Government

Energy Star Program For Homes And Appliances Is On Trump's Chopping Block (npr.org) 240

Appliance manufacturers and home builders are in Washington, D.C., today to celebrate a popular energy efficiency program, even as it's slated for elimination in President Trump's proposed budget. NPR adds: You probably know the program's little blue label with the star -- the Environmental Protection Agency says 90 percent of U.S. households do. [...] The 25-year-old Energy Star program appears to be targeted simply because it's run by the federal government. It's one of 50 EPA programs that would be axed under Trump's budget plan, which would shrink the agency's funding by more than 30 percent. Critics of Energy Star say the government should get involved in the marketplace only when absolutely necessary. But that argument doesn't hold sway for the program's legions of supporters, which span nonprofits, companies and trade groups.

Comment There should be a law... (Score 1) 187

For several years now, Amazon really has been leading the way toward making it impossible to tell the difference between joke product ideas and the real ones. Google/Apple/Microsoft have had some bad ideas too, but they all get totally left in the dust by Amazon. I mean, this is the company that sells buttons for buying stuff.

Is there a Poe's Law of consumer electronics yet? We're getting close to needing one.

Comment Re:Most States have these Occupation Codes (Score 1) 664

I'm more inclined that PE certification, like so many professional certifications, is mostly about eliminating competition and running a kind of cartel,

I can assure you that the PE certification process/requirements was started with a good intention of preventing disasters. However, the ONLY thing that prevents disaster are people who can actually do the work properly, and that the certification process/requirements are incapable of making sure that critical calculations are done correctly. We only can certify that they should be done correctly, and the person doing them should be able to complete those calculations correctly. Not that they actually can or will.

The REAL test is, if a government requires certification, and is in charge of certifications, then the liability for any failure by a certified "engineer" should rest with the certifying authority, or the certification is meaningless. And now, you know where the real problem is. It isn't the certification or the process, it is there is no liability on/for people making the requirements up.

Comment Re:I hope he wins his suit (Score 1) 664

No, but if you tell people that the Omega 3 Fatty acids in Walnuts has benefits for heart disease (Provably), you would be turning walnuts into drugs, and only the FDA can declare something a drug. And Telling people that Vitamin C will cure scurvy is the same thing. You need a prescription for vitamin C in order to cure scurvy, eating a lime (where the term Limey comes from) is something only a doctor can do.

Regulations ultimately end in idiocy.

Comment Re:The Cloud (Score 2) 79

This isn't the reason the cloud makes a terrible backup. The thing that you want to avoid with a backup is correlated failures: things that cause a failure of your primary store should be different from things that cause a failure of your backup. Your house burning down or thieves coming and stealing your computers will cause failures of both your original and on-site backups. It's a lot less likely that the founder of your cloud provider will be arrested for the same reason that you lose your laptop.

Remember: it only matters if your backup storage fails at the same time as your on-line storage.

Comment Re:SF salaries are too low (Score 1) 344

No, he's right. To afford a standard of living comparable to what the same engineer would be able to afford elsewhere, he needs to make $500K/year. That's obviously not sustainable for his employer, which means that the rational thing to do is start moving jobs out of the bay area (which some companies have already started - Microsoft closed the bay area Microsoft Research site a year or two back, for example).

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