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Comment Re:points of interest (Score 1) 378

"Zero, since it doesn't actually provide thrust."

That in itself would violate Newton's Laws of Motion, wouldn't it? Specifically, that would be Newton's Third Law, for every action, there is an equal and opposing reaction. If you're emitting something, even inside of a closed cavity, THERE MUST BE INITIAL THRUST/PUSH OFF OF THE EMITTING MATERIAL, NO MATTER HOW SMALL, EITHER POSITIVE OR NEGATIVE.

Back to school with you.

Comment Re:Its really the library not the language (Score 1) 221

Yep. I went through the curriculum of the top 10 computer science universities in the country, and all of them teach either Java or Python in their introductory programming classes. Only a single one (Stanford) even offered C++ as an alternative.

That's not a problem. The problem is with shitty schools that don't have a non-garbage-collected language required for a class anywhere in their mandatory curriculum. At my alma mater (which is one of the top-10), the required C-based class is sophomore-level and that's fine.

Submission + - Weaponizing Disinformation (nytimes.com)

XXongo writes: With a vigorous national debate underway on whether Sweden should enter a military partnership with NATO, officials in Stockholm suddenly encountered an unsettling problem: a flood of distorted and outright false information on social media, confusing public perceptions of the issue. As the defense minister, Peter Hultqvist, traveled the country to promote the pact in speeches and town hall meetings, he was repeatedly grilled about the bogus stories.
The planting of false stories is nothing new; the Soviet Union devoted considerable resources to that during the ideological battles of the Cold War. Now, though, disinformation is regarded as an important aspect of Russian military doctrine, and it is being directed at political debates in target countries with far greater sophistication and volume than in the past, using everything from paid internet trolls to faked documents to dubious news stories planted in conventional media.
The fundamental purpose of dezinformatsiya, or Russian disinformation, experts said, is to undermine the official version of events — even the very idea that there is a true version of events — and foster a kind of policy paralysis.

Comment Re:Finally! (Score 1) 64

I use Lyft for two reasons: 1. They treat their drivers better, not necessarily with more money, but at least with more respect.

That's interesting.

What /How does Lyft treat their drivers 'better'? What do you mean by 'more respect'? I'm seriously curious.

I always ask the uber drivers I have here in town that I ride with, and ALL of them seem to like driving for Uber and none have told me a bad experience with the company. So, curious what you've heard is bad from Uber towards their employees.

Comment Re:No news! (Score 1) 93

The political stuff is the worst. Every wingnut in your feed wants to spread their particular gospel. It's even worse than the blatantly religious stuff. The problem is probably what some people consider "news". Plus you've got idiots that start foaming at the mouth because they stumble onto something that feeds into their favorite narrative. It doesn't occur to them that it's an obvious satire site. It's sad, hilarious, and annoying all at once.

All memes are bullshit.

Someone may have a valid observation but they quickly run off the rails and jump the shark with extreme and absurd sh*t.

I could understand how a telepath might go nuts and would just want it all to shut off.

Submission + - Community Developers Come Up With Alternative Open-Source AMD Vulkan Driver (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: AMD pledged to open-source their Vulkan graphics driver prior to its release, but with six months passing since the new high performance graphics API was unveiled and no action by AMD, a developer from Red Hat and a university student took to developing their own open-source Radeon Vulkan driver dubbed "RADV." In just about two months of work they are now able to render Vulkan games correctly on RADV and even more impressive is the RADV open-source driver is almost as fast as the proprietary Vulkan driver. Helping them in bringing up this new open-source driver was reusing some of the open-source Radeon OpenGL/graphics code and Intel's open-source Vulkan driver. The success of this community-based AMD Vulkan driver has already led AMD to rethinking their open-sourcing priorities of their current Vulkan code.

Comment Re:Finally! (Score 1) 64

I've not tried Lyft yet, I'm assuming they're on par with Uber price wise?

But to me, Uber is priced just right....don't get me wrong, I love a good deal, but if the fares were any lower, I'd start to feel obliged to tip the driver every time...whereas the beauty of Uber is, I'm not expected to tip.

I have tipped before, especially if I was riding hammered...but also if the person was really cool, or maybe knew some good ways around traffic (and in New Orleans those special skills of drive-fu during Mardi Gras are VERY valuable)....I would gladly tip extra.

Comment Simple or disposable apps (Score 3, Insightful) 159

This'll work fine for very simple apps, ones that only require standardized functionality. But then, with an app like that, do you really need to develop a custom one for any reason other than branding/appearance? And it'll work for disposable apps, ones that do the current job but don't need to be maintained or enhanced down the road. That's been true forever, it's why spreadsheets and word processors had macro languages so secretaries and accountants could do simple operations and calculations without needing to have the programming team get involved. But the moment you start dealing with an app with complex functionality that has to be changed, enhanced and extended over time, that's when you'll discover that you need software engineers. It's the same reason anybody who can grab a hammer and saw can cobble together a sawhorse that'll work for one job, but you need someone who understands architecture and construction to build a house that's expected to last for decades.

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