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Comment Re: It's pretty simple (Score 1) 242

General Welfare is nebulous at best. It is used to describe just about anything someone wants, from Energy Star to just about every social welfare program that has become an Entitlement. Not sure how "Promote" becomes "Entitled" in perpetuity.

The odd thing is, we can't even begin to end programs that have long since served their purposes. Energy Star was great idea, but no longer has any meaning. As I pointed out, it has done nothing to curtail the greater energy sucking Vampires (LED clocks) that are plugged into every outlet of my house. Because my toaster needs a clock.

Comment Re:Another outrage article (Score 0) 242

Except that this program actually got companies "in line"

Got "in line" with what? It is just another label people ignore.

The thing of it is, that energy efficiency doesn't matter once you bought the thing that has its "Energy Star " sticker on it. Nobody calculates that the Fridge you bought 20 years ago is actually costing you money, because its energy usage is twice as much as what is available now. The new "Energy Star" stickered Fridge is twice as efficient as your "Energy Star" stickered Fridge in your kitchen. Most people think they are the same sticker, meaning the same thing "energy efficient" and relative efficiency is nothing but "fancy math stuff"

And "Energy Star" has done nothing to reduce the vampire energy loss due to everything having a damn clock in it, and the blue LED lightbulb, slowly sucking power unknown and unseen because, like the waste in federal spending, it is so small as to simply be an "rounding error".

So, I reject the idea that it is "in line" with anything actually useful, like forcing people to get rid of their 2nd (3rd) Fridge sitting in the Garage, from 30 years ago, which still has the "This unit costs $20 year to operate" Energy Star Sticker still on it. Even though it is more like $20 / month now, 30 years later.

Comment Re:It's pretty simple (Score 1) 242

I would feel fine, if you could specified exactly what you want to cut. But unlike what you're protesting (you are) isn't actually something defined constitutionally as a function of Federal Government, Defense spending actually is one of the items specifically mentioned ...

We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity ...

Not that it matters to people anymore.

Comment Re:Another outrage article (Score -1, Troll) 242

The Energy Star program costs almost nothing. There are zero government employees actually testing products.

Then, almost by definition, it is worthless. Does nothing, cost nothing and yet people are whining about it disappearing. Do you see the problem yet? Do you even begin to realize that the whole thing is a sham / scam feel good "But the evil _______ are cutting this valuable program!" anytime someone wants to remove it?

And there are thousands such programs with little more than nothing useful, but we can't cut them without some bleeding heart trotting out some anecdotal case.

Comment Re:Define Absolutely Necessary (Score 1) 242

Please define absolutely necessary.

Those proposing regulations should be able to explain what is "absolutely necessary" about their regulations, and let people decide for themselves. What we don't need are self important people telling us what is absolutely necessary just to regulate something.

I am really sure that most regulations and such start out with the best of intentions. But what I do know is that every time an edge case comes along, those regulations get expanded, to the point of ridiculousness. After all, we have to shut down that kids lemonade stand because it violates some health code somewhere.

Comment Re:This is retarded conservatism to help 'coal' (Score 5, Informative) 394

The problem is that even if coal is completely deregulated, it's not miners who are going to be doing the extraction. The future of mining is automated. At best this will just give the coal barons a few more years of profit and do dick for the miners.

But it's not even going to be that good. Natural gas is killing coal, so there isn't even going to be a coal industry by the time renewables dominate. This is a classic "buggy whip" problem, in that there ain't gonna be no more horse-drawn carriages, so there ain't gonna be no more buggy whips. Whatever you think of Clinton, she was telling the miners the truth, their jobs are quickly becoming obsolete.

And the same goes for lots of other industries. Manufacturing is rapidly automating, so that even mass repatriation of US industrial capacity is not going to deliver the same level of employment that was there even thirty years ago. There's nothing the US government can do about it, short of outlawing automation and renewables, which would be sheer madness.

Christ, no less than Rick Perry himself has admitted the US needs to stay in the Paris Accord. Even the most pro-oil of pro-oil politicians know full well the jig is up. Oil isn't coming back, and as the price falls away it's impact on the economy diminishes. Coal was the first because it's the most expensive and most obviously harmful, but it applies to all the fossil fuels.

Comment Re:Incorrect (Score 1) 394

Do you have any actual evidence that wind farms have this effect? This strikes me as arguing that NASA shouldn't use gravity assist because it robs a planet of some of its momentum.

In other words, while you're technically correct, the effect is so small as to be irrelevant. But tell you what, if you have evidence that wind farms actually have this large an effect, then provide citations. And no, some blog is not a citation. I mean peer reviewed or primary literature.

Comment Re:Most States have these Occupation Codes (Score 1) 665

I'm more inclined that PE certification, like so many professional certifications, is mostly about eliminating competition and running a kind of cartel,

I can assure you that the PE certification process/requirements was started with a good intention of preventing disasters. However, the ONLY thing that prevents disaster are people who can actually do the work properly, and that the certification process/requirements are incapable of making sure that critical calculations are done correctly. We only can certify that they should be done correctly, and the person doing them should be able to complete those calculations correctly. Not that they actually can or will.

The REAL test is, if a government requires certification, and is in charge of certifications, then the liability for any failure by a certified "engineer" should rest with the certifying authority, or the certification is meaningless. And now, you know where the real problem is. It isn't the certification or the process, it is there is no liability on/for people making the requirements up.

Comment Re:I hope he wins his suit (Score 1) 665

No, but if you tell people that the Omega 3 Fatty acids in Walnuts has benefits for heart disease (Provably), you would be turning walnuts into drugs, and only the FDA can declare something a drug. And Telling people that Vitamin C will cure scurvy is the same thing. You need a prescription for vitamin C in order to cure scurvy, eating a lime (where the term Limey comes from) is something only a doctor can do.

Regulations ultimately end in idiocy.

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