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Submission + - Germany's Energiewende: The problems remain (thebulletin.org)

Dan Drollette writes: Wanna know why certain American fossil fuel tycoons (who shall remain nameless) are so hostile to fighting climate change? Just look at what happened to the big utility companies and the large, energy-intensive heavy industries of Germany after its "Energiewende" kicked in—they are "on the brink of dissolution" from that country's embrace of renewable energy, says the author of this piece, who used to work for German utilities as their renewables go-to person.

Submission + - Argentina And Monsanto Fight Over Patents

An anonymous reader writes: Monsanto has embargoed Argentina from receiving new soybean technologies marketed by the company after the Argentine government insisted it had the sole right to demand the inspection of exports leaving the country. Monsanto has been pressuring export and shipping companies to enforce their patent royalty collection, while the Argentine government insist it holds the sole right to approve and order inspections. This patent battle is looking like it might tip to Argentina's favor given the disappointing nature of Monsanto's upcoming RoundUp Ready XTend(TM)(R) Glyphosate+Dicamba crop system.

Submission + - Argentina And Monsanto Fight Over Patents 1

An anonymous reader writes: Monsanto has embargoed Argentina from receiving new soybean technologies marketed by the company after the Argentine government insisted it had the sole right to demand the inspection of exports leaving the country. Monsanto has been pressuring export and shipping companies to enforce their patent royalty collection, while the Argentine government insist it holds the sole right to approve and order inspections. This patent battle is looking like it might tip to Argentina's favor given the disappointing nature of Monsanto's upcoming RoundUp Ready XTend(TM)(R) Glyphosate+Dicamba crop system.

Submission + - 60% of Android Phones Still Vulnerable to Months-Old TrustZone Bug

Trailrunner7 writes: A serious vulnerability in many versions of Android that allows an attacker to gain complete control of the target phone by exploiting an app in the secure portion of the operating system still affects about 60 percent of enterprise Android devices, even though a patch was released in January.

The vulnerability is in some software from Qualcomm and the attack would require that a user install a malicious app. Once the app is installed, the attacker would be able to exploit the flaw in Qualcomm’s Secure Execution Environment to eventually gain complete control of the underlying Linux kernel. The QSEE is a trusted portion of the Android operating system in which trusted apps interact with trusted memory and hardware. Under normal circumstances, code from the untrusted portion of the OS shouldn’t be allowed to run code in the QSEE. The vulnerability, combined with some other conditions, allows this to happen.

Submission + - Debian Fork Devuan Beta Released (unixmen.com)

pirat9 writes: A beta release of the Devuan Linux distro has made it into the world after two years in development. Devuan is a very Debian-ish distro. In fact, it basically is Debian, with one notable absence. Devuan doesn’t use systemd. In fact, that’s its main claim to fame. Devuan was created to offer an alternative to Debian fans who were alienated by the controversial switch to systemd.

Submission + - Asl Slashdot: How Hard Is It To Have a Smart Home That's Not 'In The Cloud'? 1

An anonymous reader writes: It's beginning to seem like everything related to home (and much other) automation is basically remote control 'in the cloud' feeding information about you to somebody's advertising system. In principle, this should not be the case, but it is in practice. So how hard is it, really, to do 'home automation' without sending all your data to Google, Samsung, or whoever — just keep it to yourself and share only what you want to share? How hard would it be, for instance, to hack a Nest thermostat so it talks to a home server rather than Google? Or is there something already out there that would do the same thing as a Nest but without 'the cloud' as part of the requirement? Yes, a standard programmable thermostat does 90% of what a Nest does, but there are certain things that it won't do like respond to your comings and goings at odd hours, or be remotely switchable to a different mode (VPN to your own server from your phone and deal with it locally, perhaps?). Fundamentally, is there a way to get the convenience and not expose my entire life and home to unknown actors who by definition (read the terms of service) do not have my best interest in mind?

Submission + - New Surveillance System May Let Cops Use All of the Cameras (wired.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The system, which is just a proof of concept, alarms privacy advocates who worry that prudent surveillance could easily lead to government overreach, or worse, unauthorized use. It relies upon two tools developed independently at Purdue. The Visual Analytics Law Enforcement Toolkit superimposes the rate and location of crimes and the location of police surveillance cameras. CAM2 reveals the location and orientation of public network cameras, like the one outside your apartment. You could do the same thing with a search engine like Shodan, but CAM2 makes the job far easier, which is the scary part. Aggregating all these individual feeds makes it potentially much more invasive.

Submission + - Google Appeals French Order For Global 'Right To Be Forgotten' (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Alphabet Inc's Google appealed on Thursday an order from the French data protection authority to remove certain web search results globally in response to a European privacy ruling, escalating a fight on the extra-territorial reach of EU law. In May 2014, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that people could ask search engines, such as Google and Microsoft's Bing, to remove inadequate or irrelevant information from web results appearing under searches for people's names — dubbed the "right to be forgotten." Google complied, but it only scrubbed results across its European websites such as Google.de in Germany and Google.fr in France, arguing that to do otherwise would set a dangerous precedent on the territorial reach of national laws. The French regulator, the Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertes (CNIL), fined Google 100,000 euros ($112,150.00) in March for not delisting more widely, arguing that was the only way to uphold Europeans' right to privacy. The company filed its appeal of the CNIL's order with France's supreme administrative court, the Council of State.

Submission + - Public Key Associated With US Defense Information Systems Agency Factored

MrBingoBoingo writes: Since No Such lAbs brought their RSA Supercollider back online in a vastly improved incarnation it has resumed the valuable work of identifying problematic PGP public keys. One of the latest keys factored appears to be a legitimate key associated with the United States Defense Information Systems Agency off all people.

Submission + - Lockheed Still Supporting Portable Nuclear Generator (defensenews.com)

mdsolar writes: Lockheed Martin continues to invest in its portable nuclear fusion generator, with that investment recently entering a more advanced stage, according to the head of the company’s Skunk Works division.

Rob Weiss told an audience at the Atlantic Council that Lockheed is “about four months into a little bit more significant investment” into the technology, which was first revealed around two years ago.
At the time of the initial announcement, Lockheed said it was aiming for a 100 megawatt device which could fit on the back of a large truck. Such a reactor, the company claims, could power a city of up to 100,000 people.
Such a technology would be a revolutionary one for an ever energy-dependent country, but would also potentially have major military applications. If the system could be further shrunk, it could potentially become a powerplant for fighter jets, providing the power needed for directed energy weapons and advanced sensors. It could also help power travel for spacecraft.

Submission + - Medical errors third leading cause of death in United States

sittingnut writes: According to a new study by patient safety researchers, led by Martin Makary, a professor of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, published in BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) and referred to in Washington Post, "medical errors" in hospitals and other health care facilities, are now the third leading cause of deaths in the United States. At over 251,000 lives per year, number of such deaths are less than those claimed by heart decease and cancer, but more than "respiratory disease, accidents, stroke and Alzheimer's".

""It boils down to people dying from the care that they receive rather than the disease for which they are seeing care," Makary said."

Echoing others, he wants results of investigations of such deaths to be made public, to help prevent them in future; "When a plane crashes, we don’t say this is confidential proprietary information the airline company owns. We consider this part of public safety. Hospitals should be held to the same standards,"

Submission + - Failing Tanks Have Hanford Site Cascading Towards Disaster

An anonymous reader writes: As the cleanup of the Hanford nuclear waste site slide continually further behind schedule local news sources are reporting that even the newer doubled walled tanks are failing to contain the high level waste. Looming on the horizon is a DOE prediction from 2008 that puts the window where contamination from the begins reaching the Columbia River only four years away.

Submission + - How Big Data Creates False Confidence (nautil.us)

Mr D from 63 writes: FTA

The general idea (of "big data") is to find datasets so enormous that they can reveal patterns invisible to conventional inquiry. The data are often generated by millions of real-world user actions, such as tweets or credit-card purchases, and they can take thousands of computers to collect, store, and analyze. To many companies and researchers, though, the investment is worth it because the patterns can unlock information about anything from genetic disorders to tomorrow’s stock prices.

But there’s a problem: It’s tempting to think that with such an incredible volume of data behind them, studies relying on big data couldn’t be wrong. But the bigness of the data can imbue the results with a false sense of certainty. Many of them are probably bogus—and the reasons why should give us pause about any research that blindly trusts big data.

So rather than succumb to “big data hubris,” the rest of us would do well to keep our skeptic hats on—even when someone points to billions of words.

Submission + - Obama's Global Warming Plan Cost Poor Americans $44 Billion, Raises Taxes By 166 (dailycaller.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The title summarized it pretty well, but here is an interesting excerpt;

"The study determined that taxing CO2 emissions or gasoline inherently hurts the poor more than the rich because the lowest-income U.S. households spend roughly 35 percent of their annual income on energy; while the highest income households spent less than 3 percent of their income on energy."

In addition to that, we keep paying the power bills of the wealthy through extreme solar subsidies. I know,..... "its all in their best interest."

Submission + - Beijing warns Chinese women not to date foriegners (chinalawtranslate.com)

An anonymous reader writes: On April 15, China’s first annual National Security Education Day, Beijing officials launched a poster campaign entitled “Dangerous Love” () that has appeared in residential districts of the capital. Using a comic strip format, Chinese women are warned against dating foreign men in case they are actually foreign agents. The cartoon story line specifically mentions state employees but it is as yet unclear why this message is being promoted in ordinary apartment complexes rather than in ministries and government offices. By targeting a mass audience this campaign is being seen some expats as a worrying trend in xenophobia by Chinese authorities. Chinese media already vilifies Japan at every possible opportunity and some observers are concerned that the government is now preparing to make all foreigners scapegoats for the failing economy. A full translation of the new poster is available here:
http://chinalawtranslate.com/n...

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