Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - State, Federal K-12 CS-For-All Legislation Focuses on All But Asian/White Boys

theodp writes: EdSource reports that California Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday aligned the state with President Obama’s $4B Computer Science for All initiative, signing into law a bill that begins a planning process to expand computer science education for all grades in California’s public schools. "It is the intent of the Legislature that all pupils in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, have access to computer science education," reads Assembly Bill No. 2329, "with a strong focus on pupils underrepresented in computer science, including girls, low-income and underserved school districts, and rural and urban school districts." And over at Congress, CA Representative Barbara Lee has also introduced H.R.6095 — Computer Science for All Act of 2016, which requires recipients of $250 million in grant funds to create "plans for expanding overall access to rigorous STEAM classes, utilizing computer science as a catalyst for increased interest in STEAM more broadly, and reducing course equity gaps for all students, including underrepresented groups such as minorities, girls, and youth from low-income families [...] Women overall face challenges in accessing computer science education." In an accompanying op-ed on the legislation, Lee argued that "Congress needs to put our money where our mouth is on STEM", adding that, "We can and must to do better, especially for girls and students of color." The legislation is consistent with the nation's new Every Student Succeeds Act, which put K-12 CS on equal footing with academic subjects such as math and English. Signed into law during last December's Computer Science Education Week, ESSA calls for "increasing access for students through grade 12 who are members of groups underrepresented in such subject fields, such as female students, minority students, English learners, children with disabilities, and economically disadvantaged students." So, with only 57,937 students out of the nation's 16 million high schoolers taking an AP CS exam in 2016, should lawmakers be pressed to spell out exactly what student groups they don't consider underrepresented in CS?

Submission + - 'Longest living human' says he is ready for death at 145 (telegraph.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: An Indonesian man who claims to be the longest living human in recorded history has described how he “just wants to die”.

Mbah Gotho, from Sragen in central Java, was born on December 31, 1870, according to the date of birth on his identity card.

Now officials at the local record office say they have finally been able to confirm that remarkable date as genuine.

Submission + - Sheriff's Raid to Find Blogger Who Criticized Him Ruled Unconstitutional (theintercept.com)

schwit1 writes: An appellate court in Baton Rouge ruled Thursday that a raid on a police officer’s house in search of the blogger who had accused the sheriff of corruption was unconstitutional.

The Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeals argued that Sheriff Jerry Larpenter’s investigation into the blog ExposeDAT had flawed rationale: the alleged defamation was not actually a crime as applied to a public official.

The unanimous ruling from the three-judge panel comes after police officer Wayne Anderson and his wife Jennifer Anderson were denied assistance in local and federal court.

Submission + - Treasury Dept. Sits On Investigation Into Solar Energy Fraud Worse Than Solyndra (dailycaller.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The Treasury Department has been looking into potential fraud by solar panel companies that got taxpayer funding for more than three years, but has yet to release any findings

The Department recently indicated that applicants included ineligible costs or otherwise overstated the value of their solar energy investments by claiming approximately $1.3 billion in unwarranted cash grants. he Treasury Department said it would publish its findings by June 2015, but that never happened.

Submission + - 32 states offer online voting, but experts warn it isn't secure (washingtonpost.com)

Geoffrey.landis writes: According to the Washington Post, 32 states have implemented some form of online voting for the 2016 U.S. presidential election-- even though multiple experts warn that internet voting is not secure. In many cases, the online voting options are for absentee ballots, overseas citizens or military members deployed overseas.

According to Verified voting, "voted ballots sent via Internet simply cannot be made secure and make easy and inviting targets for attackers ranging from lone hackers to foreign governments seeking to undermine US elections."

Submission + - Dridex Banking Malware Adds a New Trick

itwbennett writes: The Dridex banking malware has proven to be resilient despite law enforcement action last year by the U.S. and U.K. that took down part of its network. And now it's got a new trick. IBM's X-Force researchers have found that the latest version of Dridex uses a technique known as DNS cache poisoning to direct victims asking for a legitimate banking website to a fake site. Dridex's operators have created clones of the websites of 13 U.K. banks, which are used in the attacks.

Submission + - Detailed Seafloor Gravity Map Brings the Earth's Surface Into Sharp Focus (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Not so long ago the ocean floor was as unknown as the far side of the Moon. Now, an international team of scientists is using satellite data to chart the deep ocean by measuring the Earth's gravitational field. The result is a new, highly-detailed map that covers the three-quarters of the Earth's surface that lies underwater. The map is already providing new insights into global geology.

Submission + - U.S. Army Automated Airdrops Experimenting With Image Recognition Instead Of GPS (thestack.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Army’s Joint Precision Airdrop System (JPADS) is trialling new technology which uses a satellite relay to guide unmanned drops more accurately to their target, by comparing what they see in descent to commercial satellite imagery of the terrain. Three thousand casualties occurred in Afghanistan in 2007 due to troops trying to retrieve dropped consignments which strayed into enemy territory or down the sides of mountains in rough terrain.

Submission + - Hawking Says Scientific Progress is Major Source of New Threats to Humanity

HughPickens.com writes: BBC reports that according to Stephen Hawking most of the threats humans now face come from advances in science and technology, including nuclear war, global warming and genetically-engineered viruses. "Although the chance of a disaster to planet Earth in a given year may be quite low, it adds up over time, and becomes a near certainty in the next thousand or ten thousand years," said Hawking in answer to a question during the BBC Reith Lectures. "By that time we should have spread out into space, and to other stars, so a disaster on Earth would not mean the end of the human race. However, we will not establish self-sustaining colonies in space for at least the next hundred years, so we have to be very careful in this period."

During his lecture Hawking also answered a question on whether his synthesized electronic voice had shaped his personality, perhaps allowing the introvert to become an extrovert. Replying that he had never been called an introvert before, Hawking added: “Just because I spend a lot of time thinking doesn’t mean I don’t like parties and getting into trouble.”

Submission + - Second OPM Hack Revealed: Even Worse Than The First (techdirt.com)

nickweller writes: Oh great. So after we learned late yesterday that the hack of all sorts of data from the federal government's Office of Personnel Management (OPM) was likely much worse than originally believed — including leaking all Social Security numbers unencrypted — and that the so-called cybersecurity "experts" within the government weren't even the ones who discovered the hack, things are looking even worse.

'The forms authorities believed may have been stolen en masse, known as Standard Form 86, require applicants to fill out deeply personal information about mental illnesses, drug and alcohol use, past arrests and bankruptcies. They also require the listing of contacts and relatives, potentially exposing any foreign relatives of U.S. intelligence employees to coercion. Both the applicant's Social Security number and that of his or her cohabitant is required.'

Submission + - Why I Defaulted on My Student Loans (nytimes.com)

schwit1 writes: There are some valid points raised in Lee Siegel's 1100 word rant against college loans (if not so much against college education). There are some bad ones. But two things are clear: the words "personal" and/or "responsibility" were used precisely zero times, and the op-ed writer, who described himself as "the author of five books who is writing a memoir about money", is hardly a glowing advertisement for an education attained (funded with either debt or equity) at one of the Ivy League's "best", Columbia University.

That, or the return on money after spending nearly a decade in university and taking out tens of thousands in loans just to achieve a Master of Philosophy degree.

Submission + - How to prevent an idea from being patented? 6

Simon Brooke writes: I have an idea for a simple medical device which would greatly help in the monitoring of a disease I have, and several other diseases as well. Sooner or later one of the medical device companies is going to come up with this idea, patent it, and make a monopoly profit from it. I would much rather it were in the public domain, so all device manufacturers could use it freely, and it would therefore be available to patients at lower cost. Is there any way I can publish it that puts it in the public record, and prevents patents? Or should I actually apply for a patent and then give it away royalty free?

Submission + - 7 Timeless Lessons Of Programming 'Graybeards'

snydeq writes: The software industry venerates the young — sometimes to its own detriment. There are just some things you can experiences come only after many lost weeks of frustration borne of weird and inexplicable bugs. InfoWorld's Peter Wayner offers up several hard-earned lessons of seasoned programmers that are often overlooked when chasing after the latest, trendiest architectures, frameworks, and stacks. 'In the spirit of sharing or to simply wag a wise finger at the young folks once again, here are several lessons that can't be learned by jumping on the latest hype train for a few weeks. They are known only to geezers who need two hexadecimal digits to write their age.' What are yours?

Slashdot Top Deals

To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk. -- Thomas Edison

Working...