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Comment Re:Sociopaths gonna sociopath. What's new? (Score 1) 122

Well also the more you have the more you can lose.

This really isn't new. Back in the great depression much of this discussion of this as well.

"I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'" - composed in 1934 by George Gershwin
"Folks with plenty of plenty.They've got a lock on the door. Afraid somebody's going to rob 'em.While there out (a) making more - what for"

Comment Re:except it wasn't people renting out their rooms (Score 3, Insightful) 43

However the law shouldn't had been such a blanket ban, but more targeted towards people who abuse the service. Stipulations such as a minimum living time, in the building by the owners say 200 days a year. Rules to insure that safety and equality measures are taken place as AirBnB does have a problem with people excluding minorities. In essence to make sure people who are using the service are not playing by a different set of rules.

Comment Re:Abandonware and right to repair need to fixed a (Score 1) 92

Abandonware and right to repair need to fixed as well.

Right to repair needs to be fixed so that we can preserve our precious resources, I'm with you there. Abandonware can be fixed by just saying no to closed source software, and the cultural impact of losing some games is pretty minimal.

Comment Re:This is why you can't use a good keyboard any m (Score 1) 232

You seriously use a keyboard like that in an open office? Speaking of prima donna ... I heard there's someone upset by the type of keyboard they're using now.

On a squishy keyboard I type about 80-90 WPM at about 99% accuracy, a little less. On a hard clicky keyboard I type 90-100 WPM at a little more than 99%. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the difference is larger for some other people — I have big, fat, strong hands because I occasionally do shit more strenuous than typing or wanking, and because I'm a super mutant.

Comment Re:The popularity of open offices has exacerbated (Score 1) 232

Cubes aren't inherently bad. I have been in offices which use cubes which have been lovely and I have been in offices which use cubes which have been shitty and the difference is very simple: did they choose cubes for flexible plan seating, or did they choose cubes because they couldn't afford walls? If the latter, they use short, cheap cube walls that do little to nothing to block noise and which everyone can trivially "groundhog" over. If the former, then they have 8' tall, sound-deadening cube walls. They can actually make your cube quieter than an office, if the ceiling is also sufficiently sound-deadening. I used to work at Silicon Engineering and I knew someone who worked for Parallel Computing. We had the cheap short shit cubes. They had the big tall plush cubes. Not only are they better for workers, but they actually look more professional.

Comment Re:Problem solved (Score 1) 232

No where I've worked was that a normal practice. I imagine because you were told to go home if you were sick, regardless of your sick days, and you would have to use vacation days. If it became a recurring problem, well, there's always the falling performance review to encourage you to move on.

Yes, such policies are the very reason why people come in to work sick. They can't afford to call in sick, so they don't. They show up and make you sick because your policies demand it.

Comment Re:In the long run (Score 1) 75

Yeah, because the Nazis were the only people ever to do that. It wouldn't have gotten worse in the meantime. Stalin didn't purge his population to a greater degree than Hitler. Mao didn't kill astronomical numbers of his people during his purges. There was no Uganda under Idi Amin. Rwanda didn't happen. There wasn't a breakup of Yugoslavia, even.

Comment Re:Donald Trump is evil (Score 1) 119

As I recall it, he slightly qualified his remarks, but for illustrative purposes, let me paraphrase his qualification to illustrate the original problem:

"Some of the police are, I assume, good people."

Actually, this one one of the times when Trump may have stretched for a Level 3 lie of framing the context. Assuming that all but a few of the police are bad people is certainly a kind of frame.

Most of the time Trump is lying at Level 0 of self contradiction or Level 1 of counterfactual statements. My problem is I hate liars. Yeah, I know that no one is perfect or capable of telling the complete truth all of the time. Some liars are more equal than others. Reminds me how some imperfections, like sexual assault, are more imperfect that others...

Obviously I hope the Donald goes down, and hard, but the enthusiasm gap is hard to assess. Also, this is an unprecedented election in so many ways that it wouldn't be surprising if the polls are off.

Comment Re:Just like China (Score 1) 421

The meaning of "progressive" is defined by the history of progressivism,

Typically meanings are "defined" by current usage, not (directly) history. You should know that.

And the reason they could get away with that and stay in business is that (1) government has limited competition and (2) government has limited the ability of customers to sue those companies.

For #1, let's take an actual example. How exactly did the gov't allow MS to become an OS near-monopoly for desktops?

Per #2, most of the customers I was paid to screw didn't even know it. You can't sue if you don't know you've been manipulated. Part of the art of manipulation is not letting the manipulated party know they've been had. (I'm not condoning it all. I just ended up in such situations.)

Further, much of it wasn't illegal, just sneaky. Most trickery is not illegal and shouldn't necessarily be illegal.

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