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Comment An Actual Comment About the Article (Score 1) 63

Since every other post seems to be eye-rollinging inept trolls or meta-commentary about gender along the full spectrums, I thought I'd actually pos about the content since I read most of the article before I saw it on Slashdot...

It's more interesting than you might think as the people polled are from different technical fields, so the answers are a lot more varied than you usually get in a predictive piece.

If you take a step back though what is really interesting is how much the whole thing together looks like the parable of the blind men and the elephant, each describing only the part they could feel.. The actual future we reach by 2027 will be a really odd mash of all the answers given, where a breakthrough in any number of fields could change the dominance of one answers probability over the others..

Personally I hold out for the dark horse of computational biology taking the forefront by 2027. Perhaps that ship at the end of System Shock 2 was... US!

Comment You have got to be joking (Score 2) 63

*virtue_signal*I don't mind these are all women, I think it's great.*virtue_signal*

However, how many times on Facebook now have I seen an image of "Tumps Economic Team" noting that it's all men and a few of them named Steve to boot? (Never mind that he has already appointed a few women for various roles, or that he won the election because of a team of women)

You seriously do not think MS would be roasted if in this ay and age they came out with a think piece like this, all from men?

Heck, you are doing that RIGHT NOW.

Comment Re:China's Trump is named Xi (Score 2) 378

China has 1,448 naturalised Chinese in total. Almost no foreigners are able to become citizens (source).

Even Japan, better known for hostility to immigration, naturalises around 10,000 new citizens each year; in America the figure is some 700,000.

If you aren't Han, you are in trouble in China.

Comment Re:cheap chinese crap (Score 1) 73

How loud it is in the headphones depends on the output of the amplifier

If you are sneaky, you could have a circuit that limits the voltage amplitude coming into the headphones. This could be stupid dumb (a diode limiter) or something more complex like an active gain control.

However I suspect most kid headphones are assuming the input maxes out at 2 VRMS, and use resistor dividers to reduce the voltage into the speakers. This dumb solution means that sometimes kids might not be able to hear overly quiet videos (such as on Kids Youtube) where audio loudness is not well managed.

Comment Glitchless streaming. (Score 4, Interesting) 150

Can you name one thing that your customers actually want that is actually being prevented by network neutrality regulations?

Glitchless streaming.

Streaming (things like audio, video, phone calls) requires relatively small and constant bandwidth (though compression adds variability) but isn't good at tolerating dropouts or variations in transit time. When it does get dropouts it's better to NOT send a retry correction (and have the retry packet risk delaying and/or forcing the drop of another packet).

TCP connections (things like big file transfers) error check and retry, fixing dropouts and errors so the data arrives intact, though with no guarantee exactly when. But they achieve high bandwidth and evenly divide the bandwidth at a bottleneck by deliberately speeding up until they super-saturate the bottleneck and force dropouts. The dropouts tell them they've hit the limit, so they slow down and track the bleeding edge.

Put them both on a link and treat the packets equally and TCP causes streaming to break up, stutter, etc. Overbuilding the net helps, but if the data to be tranferred is big enough TCP will ALWAYS saturate a link somewhere along the way.

Identify the traffic type and treat their packets differently - giving higher priority to stream packets (up to a limit, so applications can't gain by cheating, claiming to be a stream when they're not) - and then they play together just fine. Stream packets zip through, up to an allocation limit at some fraction of the available bandwidth, and TCP transfers evenly divide what's left - including the unused part of the streams' allocation.

But the tools for doing this also enable the ISPs to do other, not so good for customers, things. Provided they chose to do so, of course.

IMHO the bad behavior can be dealt with best, not by attempting to enforce "Network Neutrality" as a technical hack at an FCC regulation level, but as a consumer protection issue, by an agency like the FTC. Some high points:
  - Break up the vertical integration of ISPs into "content provider" conglomerates, so there's no incentive to penalize the packets of competitors to the mother-ship's services.
  - Treat things like throttling high-volume users and high-bandwidth services as consumer fraud: "You sold 'internet service'". Internet service doesn't work that way. Ditto "pay for better treatment of your packets" (but not "pay to sublet a fixed fraction of the pipe").
  - Extra scrutiny for possible monopolistic behavior anywhere there are less than four viable broadband competitors, making it impractical for customers to "vote with their feet".

Comment Re:Civic society implies civil rights (Score 1) 378

Well, depending on how much you believe the rhetoric, anyone who isn't a white male might feel safer in China. I'm hoping that almost all of it is just rhetoric, but I don't feel any certainty about it. In fact if you believe *some* of the rhetoric anyone who isn't a rich white male might feel safer in China. This strikes me as unlikely, but remembering how a prior German democracy fell it's not beyond the bounds of possibility.

OTOH, there are a lot of signs that Trump is not an actual racial bigot, but merely someone who feels right in taking advantage of any power he can get his hands on. I'd feel happier with this interpretation if his cabinet picks were different.

Comment Re:No Innovation in China (Score 1) 378

It NEVER made sense. Not ever. In the early days it took inventors and coerced them into chasing around the country looking for people who might be infringing on their patents. As companies took over it became more and more about getting patents so vague that nobody could tell for sure what what infringing, and getting the legal decisions that meant that was a case that would be found in favor of the patent holder.

The basic idea was reasonable, but the implementation was flawed from the beginning, and my guess is that the grant of a monopoly was the basic flaw. Perhaps instead it should have been a law that the government would only buy from the holder, or a licensee, of the patent.

Comment Why does it have to more than convenient? (Score 3, Interesting) 103

I always thought...Apple watch was a solution looking for a problem that doesn't exist.

You can make toast easily in a pan or an in an oven. A toaster then, is an answer to a problem that doesn't exist.

Why does everything have to be the only possible answer to a problem? The Apple Watch is not the ultimate answer to any one problem - but it is more convenient for a lot of things. It's been really handy for dismissing calls in meetings because I can quickly glance to see if I need to take it, and cover the watch if I want to dismiss it so my phone stays in my pocket. It means my phone is not left on tables as much and is less likely to be forgotten...

It also is handy around the house, I don't have to have my phone with me to see I've got a text message or receive a call. Would I use the watch normally for a phone call? No but in that one case, it's quite handy.

It also does make for a really great fitness device. After all it is fully programmable so you have custom apps for any purpose that you can quickly glance at. Again the phone would serve also but the watch is just much handier.

It also means that I am less tied to a particular form factor of phone. I like to run so if I were just using my phone for tracking I'd be inclined to get a smaller phone so I could strap it on my arm... but since I have the Apple Watch I have the larger size of phone than I might otherwise.

Now, if the device was truly stand alone, that's one thing

The airily named "series 2" includes GPS so you can indeed do some things (like record runs) without a phone. That is a natural evolution but for the moment I'm a lot happier with a watch that easily lasts a 16-20 hour day than I would be with a cell connection I almost never use.

Also of course, around the house all of the Apple Watches are connected via WiFi and so do not need the phone on your person...

Comment Re:Mandate reporting when antibiotics are prescrib (Score 1) 72

Yes. But we need to be aware that man is not the only source of antibiotics. They naturally occur. We get a good lot of them from plants and bacteria, starting of course with penicilin which we got from mold, and which was already present on salted food and damp environments. What we did was to make antibiotics present in organisms other than their natural sources.

Comment What is your problem? (Score 2, Insightful) 221

they'll censor whatever the fuck they want to.

Dude, WTF? Wake up. ... It's freakin' FACEBOOK! They can and could always do whatever the f*ck they want! With your content, with your data, ... they could eben change their TOS to allow them to superimpose everyones portrait on animal porn images and there'd be nothing for you to do about it other than delete your account and and all your data and hope that no one downloaded those images to their computer or other parts of the intarweb.

I'd say FB and Twitter curbing hate-propaganda is actually the lesser evil. People who are dumb enough to post such stuff on FB are probably best kept from doing serious harm. To others *and* themselves.

Comment Re:Hey Slashdot: (Score 1) 131

The paywalled sites are monetizing the news, and that almost always makes for biased reporting.

Just the opposite. Breitbart is not only non-paywalled, but they're one of relatively few sites who still offers full-text RSS feeds. Paywalled sites are trying to pay for their unbiased reporting, rather than taking funds from partisan sources who will be happy with endless financial losses to further their agenda.

Comment Re:The survey between the commercials. (Score 1) 134

it must also be annoying to know that when they for example do show movies, between the commercials, then it has been cut to fit the time slots. So you can never expect to see a full movie on TV.

Longer movies aren't always better. Plenty of cases where the TV version cuts out the tedium and really improves the film over the original version (Pluto Nash comes to mind). Plenty of examples where the added material to the "Director's Cut" slows down and basically ruins a decent movie, rather than improving it (Dumb and Dumber, Chronicles of Riddick, etc, etc.)

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