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Comment Re: s/drug trials/climate change/g (Score 1) 241

Are you unfamiliar with the phrase "hand waving", or just being deliberately obtuse?

Science is about numerically accurate, falsifiable predictions. We need some of those in the Climate Change debate, but the science isn't there yet. Non-scientists like yourself, however, are happy to substitute hand waving (like a magician, hoping to distract the audience from the lack of substance).

Comment Re:Shocking!!!! (Score 1) 162

Cultures differ. I find the European mindset of desiring the state to provide for their needs to be immature. Maturity, in my opinion, requires a realization that no one has a right to another person's labor....no matter how much they claim to "need" it.

I get that: and I look down on people at the outer suburban shopping centre who are mooching off my labour.
But. we already have plenty of overproduction of the basics of life, with tons of automation coming that will displace lower skilled jobs. So were are heading for a more socialist society whether we like it or not, and the USA is behind the 8ball on this paradigm shift.

Comment Travel mode, AKA... (Score 1) 123

My phone has a global "travel mode", AKA "Airplane mode."

IOW, I just disconnect when traveling. Also when sleeping. And working.

The Internet in all its various forms and guises serves me. Not the other way around. If it's not that way for you, you need to stop selling death-sticks, go home, and rethink your life. Go on. Go.

Comment Idiocracy doubles down (Score 1) 98

You've really missed the point.

No, I really have not.

You are after complexity of the OS so that you can do complicated things with the OS.

I just want bloody subfolders and the ability to get at the filesystem. I don't care if I have to turn it on specially. I don't care if your snowflake pilots can't see it. I just want it to really work without having to root the bloody phone.

You think you're arguing for sophistication and intellect

Good grief, no. I'm arguing for pre-1990 levels, almost prehistoric levels by computing standards, of organizing capacity. There's nothing wrong with most user's intellects -- other than the intellects behind the reasoning that says "one level is all you get", now those intellects are simply downright crippled.

Your use cases differ wildly from most of the billions of the users of iOS devices in where you feel the need for complexity.

Yeah, my use case incorporates the concept of organization far beyond what these crippled devices allow, and yes, I readily admit this is beyond most phone-only users comprehension at the moment (although not if they have ever used a desktop or laptop computer), but just as you said, they (you mentioned pilots, I'd add four-year-olds) could cope with it if it was there. I don't even think they they should have to; I just think I should be able to.

The idea that everyone must suffer because pilots - or whomever - want simple is nothing less than anathema to me. I despise it, and I despise its proponents, and I find their reasoning (which is being far too generous) to be unworthy of serious consideration.

Filesystems promote organization. Single level folders went out of use in the 1980's, and the reason they did is because they are insufficient to organize any amount of data beyond a cupful. And no, "search" is not a valid replacement, before anyone tries to jump into that moldy old corner. The very fact that my home screen overflows onto additional pages and I am unable to properly, reasonably, organize my apps and data is a huge red flag that the system itself is deficient. Multiple cores, GHz+ clock speeds, gigs of ram and storage... and I can't have bleeding subfolders? Jesus. Hosiphat. Christ.

And the Long-Dong-Silver sized irony here is that if you DO dig into the actual systems underneath the sadly flattened icons to see how the phone actually works, what will you find? YOU. WILL. FIND. SUBFOLDERS.

There's simply no adequate justification for the intentional, irreversible crippling that's been done to end-user level of these devices. None.

Comment Might want to move providers... (Score 2) 33

It might be a good idea to change art hosting providers then... I'm sure every artist has given deviantArt a (non-exclusive0 icense to commercially display and use the artwork shown on the site, which means Wix can use that. And chances are, they'll let customers use some of that artwork on their website, both as a hook and a retainer (because the art can only be used on Wix hosted websites without obtaining a license).

And only Wix has access to unique artwork that only Wix customers can use, so it's more attractive to join Wix.

Meanwhile, everyone who posted art on the site sees their work ripped off and used on customer's web sites.

Comment Re:Social media? (Score 2) 113

Because really, however bad the news was, 20 years ago you'd be waiting for the nightly news to find out about it. Several decades before that, you'd be waiting for the following day's newspaper. Now, we're getting constant updates, and those updates may be causing a device in your pocket to vibrate and make noise every time something new comes out. We know that checking all of those notifications is addictive, and not checking causes stress. However, constantly feeling the need to check also causes stress. (human nature)

It's the reason we have the term "FOMO", or Fear of Missing Out. By not being attached to our phones 24/7 we fear we're going to miss big news about something (... almost always trivial in the big scheme of things).

If you hate that term, get used to it - it's a root of the term for the phobia, and as a medical diagnosis.

Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 96

I want crypto that has a good chance of outlasting the heat death of the universe

Why, are you Doctor Who and got the key to unraveling space and time or something? And even if someone should bother, do you really care if crypto-archaeologists find your tin foil hat conspiracies or pr0n collection (I was considering saying love letters and gf sex video, but it's /.) many thousand years from now when you and everyone who ever knew you is countless generations dead? I do care about 20 or 50 years from now but unless we make significant progress towards immortality in that time, I hardly care what happens after I become worm food.

Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 96

The cheapest EC2 node has one CPU at a reserve pricing as low as $0.003 for a t2.nano instance. The exact math I used is:

(6500 * 365 * 24) * 0.003 = $170,820

I realize that a nano instances don't really have much CPU power available (they're intended to be used for bursty tasks), but Google didn't define what a "CPU hour" was, so neither did I.

Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 96

Assuming Amazon has sufficient capacity, it could be completed in an arbitrarily short amount of time by spinning up enough instances. Amazon bills by aggregate time, so the cost of one node for two days is the same as the cost of two nodes for one day.

My point was more to show that it's potentially achievable without Google or NSA sized budgets, and that the cost would only shrink from there over time.

Comment Re:The magic is dead. (Score 2) 128

Computing is pretty much ubiquitous nowadays. When I first got into computing back in grade school around 1981-82, computers were just this incredibly awesome thing.

And no matter how fast technology goes there's a diminishing return, like the difference between CGA, EGA and VGA is never coming back no matter how much people talk about 4K, 10 bit, HDR, Rec. 2020 and so on. Doubling from 1MB to 2MB meant more than 1GB to 2GB. The last time I was genuinely floored by new hardware was in 2002 with Morrowind when I installed a new GPU with hardware T&L. Suddenly the grass looked like grass, the sea looked like sea, things started to have realistic textures and shadows and whatnot. Sure in sum we've come far since then, but never in huge leaps like that. That and modem -> DSL was also huge, but of course not as huge as getting Internet in the first place.

Comment Re:Are two hashes better than one? (Score 1) 96

Taking the MD5 and the SHA1 of something isn't significantly more secure than just taking the SHA1 of said something. This was demonstrated in 2004 here: http://link.springer.com/chapt... This was then further elaborated and improved upon here: http://eprint.iacr.org/2008/07... So, don't concatenate hashes kids. It doesn't do what you think it does. Using a proper hash from the start is the only safe way to do things. Even if nobody has figured out how to do it yet the math conclusively shows that breaking SHA1+MD5 is not significantly harder than just breaking SHA1. This is why TLS 1.1 and earlier need to go away.

That's for concatenated hashes. As in, you hash the two hashes to form one number, usually by XOR'ing the numbers together. Which can be shown to increase the solution space considerably.

What I've been curious about, is if you maintain two hashes separately.

You have blob X here, with SHA-1 of S(X) and MD5 M(X). Can you find a blob Y with both a SHA-1 of S(X) and MD5 of M(X)?

It's easy to see if you XOR S(X) and M(X) you make it much easier - but what if we kept them separate, so the SHA-1 AND MD5 has to match. (With concatenation, you don't have to match, the final result has to match, but individually inside you have to find a S(Y)+M(Y) that equals S(X)+M(X), and not S(Y)==S(X) AND M(Y)==M(X).

The only concatenation that wouldn't be easier is if you literally concatenated the bytes together - so 128 bits of MD5 followed by 160 bits of SHA-1 to form a 288 bit MD5/SHA-1 hash that enforces the property that the two hashes individually MUST match simultaneously.

Comment Re:Shocking!!!! (Score 1) 162

It has always surprised me how little protection a US worker gets. Like your health care system; it sucks compared to the rest of the modern world (unless you are rich)

There seems to be this culture in the US of : There is nothing stopping you from becoming rich and powerful; and if you don't work hard enough, then you don't deserve anything.

Its like a society that got stuck at the selfish adolescent stage if independence, rather than moving to the mature state of interdependence. (ie like the EU, Canada, Australia, NZ), where society realises it need to provide basic health and employment protection services for those that aren't as smart, healthy or motivated as others.

Comment Re:Practical? (Score 1) 96

Yeah, um...except for a 3 letter agency with a 10 or 11 figure budget or a Google no one has the money to devote this much CPU time to one attack. SHA-1 is still fine unless your worried about 3 letter agencies in which case you probably have bigger problems than just encryption -- problems like drones with missiles attached.

I can easily throw 1 million cores at a problem. That's 2.5 days to get an answer. My company would be pissed at me for wasting the resources, and would fire me, but I could do it. There are lots of people like me in the world.

Fun fact: a core-year on EC2 Spot generally costs less than $100. No clue how many cores you could get in parallel, but lots of organizations could throw $500k in IT spending at a problem, they just need to achieve something worth more than that by doing so.

I bet doing the same with an ASIC solution would be surprisingly cost effective if you had a lot of digital signatures to forge.

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