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Comment Re:Defective by Design (Score 1) 187

Apple pay isn't on android, by definition. Unless you're talking about the competing Google Pay, which is a different competing standard.

You mean Android Pay, not Google Pay. And it's not a different, competing standard. Both Apple Pay and Android Pay use the same NFC technologies and standards.

On the name, I should point out that it's somewhat understandable that you call it "Google Pay", since Android Pay is a successor to Google Wallet, which was Google's original NFC payment solution, released in 2011 (long before Apple Pay). The Google Wallet approach was a little different, though. Because of payment network limitations, Google used a "proxy card" solution, where a Google-issued credit card was what was actually used to pay at the point of sale, and Google then charged your credit card on the backend. That approach had problems both for the user, who might not get full credit from rewards cards, and for Google, who lost money on every transaction due to the difference in fees between the card-present transaction at point of sale, and the card-not-present transaction used for user's payment, but had the supreme advantage that it would work with any credit or debit card. Banks also really disliked the proxy card solution because it threatened to take too much control of the payment systems away from them. With the intermediate routing step Google could have arranged to use any payment system on the back end, and then used its clout to get the point of sale updated to a solution that didn't involve the banks, and removed the banks from the process completely. There's no evidence Google was going to do that, but the banks were afraid of it and chose to make Google's life very hard in all sorts of ways around the NFC proxy card (and its physical, plastic analogue, which Google issued for a while).

Apple waited until networks were ready to do "network tokenization", and until some more banks were ready to handle NFC transactions, both of which are required to enable the Apple Pay model where the payment is done directly against the user's card, with payment clearinghouses routing the the transaction directly to the bank that issued the credit card. Android Pay uses this same model, with the difference that if you have a credit card which was previously used with the Google Wallet proxy card solution, Google "grandfathers" your card in and continues using the proxy. This direct model fixes the disadvantages of the proxy card solution, but means that you can only use cards whose issuers have set up the necessary infrastructure. But these days, lots of them have. In particular, the big bank service providers like First Data have got everything set up so their clients who issue credit cards can do NFC. This means that nearly all small banks and credit unions can do it, and most of the big banks can do it. Some of the big banks, and many of the medium-sized banks still aren't set up.

(Note that I've intentionally left out some details, like the first version of Google Wallet using a direct, non-tokenized approach that only worked with one bank, and some of the other intermediate steps. I figured this was long enough.)

Comment Re:Who would have guessed? (Score 1) 202

Government procurement contracts pretty much preclude the government obtaining goods and services on the open market. Instead it must rely to a large degree on contractors and vendors who have the capability of handling all the special paperwork and requirements.

So if you're on a procurement committee you don't have much choice. Once you discard the vendors who (a) can't absorb the amount of money to be spent on schedule and (b) jump through the statutory federal contractor hoops, what you're left with is a rogues gallery of usual suspects.

Comment Re: Does "not feeling old" mean minimalized? (Score 1) 178

Non-unlockable bootloaders are a bug.

I agree. Talk to your device manufacturer about their bug, but I don't expect them to listen to you. If you want to avoid that bug, you have to buy a device from an OEM that allows unlocking. If enough people voted with their wallets in this way OEMs *would* listen, and non-unlockable bootloaders would disappear.

Comment Re:Nonsense. Hillary supporter lying 2 cover is FA (Score 1) 286

"Libertarians believe you shouldn't go to prison for refusing to vaccinate your children."
  You will not go to jail they just can not go to public school. Unvaccinated children put others at risk and their is no reason to not vaccinate. Putting ideology over science == anti science crack pot.

"In 1973, Stein graduated magna cum laude from Harvard, where she studied psychology, sociology, and anthropology. She then attended Harvard Medical School and graduated in 1979. After graduating from Harvard Medical School, Stein practiced internal medicine for 25 years."

See above plus she called nuclear power plants are, "Nuclear power plants = weapons of mass destruction waiting to be detonated.
Time to shut them down". And she calls trains hauling oil, "bomb trains" and also calls them "weapons of mass destruction"...
AKA crack pot extremist.

See seems to suffer from expert syndrome. She is a doctor so she thinks that she is an expert in everything.

Comment Re:Nonsense. Hillary supporter lying 2 cover is FA (Score 1) 286

Yea well the US and the world has a big problem.
All 4 of the major candidates should not be elected as president.
Trump is a fat cat crack pot. I could list things like the way he talks about women, the crazy wall plan, or his wanting to ban people from coming to the US based on religion but the list is just too long. He is so bad that he makes Clinton look like a not that bad choice.
Clinton just can not be trusted. She still does not admit that she did anything wrong with her email server even after classified data was found on it. Throw in her not having Boko Haram classified as a terrorist group and you just have to say, "WHAT"!!!

Gary Johnson... Anti Vax.... AKA anti science crack pot.
Jill Stien.... Anti Vax ..... AKA anti science crack pot.

It is like we have a choice between the Four Horseman of the Apocalypse.

Comment Re:or, maybe Google screwed up "ownership" (Score 1) 178

Google is sort of doing that now. Incase you have not read more and more new features are being rolled into Google Play services and the Google Now Launcher. Google controls the version of those two systems with the Google Play Store. It is not prefect but it is better than it was.

Yes you have a lot of different ARM chips but the instruction sets are not very different. Most Android devices use a Cortex A series SOC the wifi and cell radios are also limited in number. The big differences are going to be things like the display and camera. Some manufactures will add things like a custom sound system as well to try and make their device standout. The other issue is their custom skins which is probably a huge time sink.

IMHO if Google really wanted to push this they would have kept Motorola. The first fruits of Google running Motorola the MotoX and Moto G where/are really good phones. If Google had kept producing good phones with constant updates then other companies would have had to compete with that.

Comment Re:or, maybe Google screwed up "ownership" (Score 1) 178

If Google had designed (? or something?) Android so that updating the base OS was something that could be pushed direct from Google instead of from each manufacturer's bollixed version of the system, there'd be no problem for any of us.

That may seem obvious now, but it's far from clear that Android would have succeeded the way it has if OEMs hadn't been allowed to differentiate their versions. That was (and is) something that's important to them, and they may well have decided that they wanted to do their own thing instead if Google hadn't given them the degree of control they wanted. Or maybe they'd have adopted Windows, since while it wouldn't allow them to customize it would have had the advantage of being from the then-biggest OS maker around.

It seems very likely that the ability of OEMs to customize was a core component of what made the Android ecosystem successful.

Also, keep in mind that the only way Google could really have kept OEMs from modifying Android however they like would have been to keep it closed. Personally, I'm glad that Google made the choices it did, not because I'm a Google employee working on Android (though I am), but because I've been an open source and free software advocate since before Google even existed. Android is far from perfect, and devices aren't as open as I would like, but I think the mobile software world is much better than it would have been without a F/LOSS mobile OS.

Comment Re:Outrageously short service life for updates (Score 1) 178

I still think that two years of updates is outrageous forced obsolescence that is prematurely adding electronic garbage to landfills.

FWIW, it's actually two years of upgrades and three years of security updates on Nexus devices.

I'm seriously considering going back to an iPhone on my next phone upgrade, despite all the concerns I have about them too. They at least support their hardware for around 5 years.

At least they have done so in the past. Note that they've never made any commitment to that, so they could stop.

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