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Comment Re:Heads-up Texas Holdem (Score 1) 146

You have never done any game development, it's obvious.

The step from single-player game to multiplayer game is not a simple upgrade, it's a complete shift in everything. It requires a completely different approach, not a refined version of the same approach.

In any non-trivial multiplayer game, the interactions between all the players matter, and the complexity of those is subject to combinatorial explosion. Poker being a relatively low-interaction game will not make this as bad as some others, but beating one person and beating a table of people is not the same system with a little more cycles, it quite possibly requires a different approach altogether.

It will be interesting to see the jump happen, but it is a jump, not a step.

AI beating humans at a game is merely a beta test. The real application will feed unending greed, which will never die.

Greed is a game.

Comment Re:Fairness has a role (Score -1) 208

Government laws cause the drugs to be that expensive in the first place. There shouldn't be such a thing as government ran FDA. A rating agency can exist without a government involvement. But of course I am 100% on board that there shouldn't be any copyright or patent laws in the first place. Let the authors protect their own rights without any artificial government created and protected monopoly.

I say drug companies need to rely on trade secrets if they want that monopoly, not on any dorm of government intervention. As to prices being 'unfair', that is a load of crock in the free market. Unfortunately we don't have a free market especially where it comes to the drugs, we gave government oppression instead.

If I invent a cure for cancer or HIV or anything serious, I would only sell it as a treatment in a protected facility, so that the information in it would stay private for as long as I can keep it. The price would be whatever I say and if a government comes for it I would much rather see it destroyed, wiped out rather than sine collectivist government violate my private property rights.

Comment Re:Gouge the middle class to make them poor (Score 0) 208

Of course, the nuclear family of the 1950s had:
a 1200 (not 2200) sqft house,
formica (not granite) counters, ...

But the house was owned - with a mortgage affordable on a single income and substantial equity in place.

The car was also either owned or being purchased on an auto loan (rather than leased), again with substantial equity from the down payment, and again paid for out of that single income - which was also feeding and clothing the 2.3 children and taking a nontrivial vacation once a year or so.

And I have no idea where you are getting those square footage numbers. Our family's houses (we moved a couple times once Dad got done with his degree and was buying rather than living in a student ghetto) were substantially larger than you describe, and were typical of the neighborhoods around them.

Yes, Formica: It was the big deal of the time. Granite is a recent vanity - and a REALLY STUPID idea if you actually USE the kitchen to prepare food on a regular basis. Drop a ceramic or glass utensil on a granite counter and it breaks. Drop it on Formica-over-plywood-or-hardwood and it usually bounces.

stainless steel appliances,
automatic dishwasher,
automatic dryer,
*might* have had a TV (not a 54" LCD),

Yeah we had all those boxes (though the appliances were be enamel rather than stainless). Also a console sound system - pre "Hi Fi" - AM, FM, and four-speed record changeer with diamond needle in the pickup.

The non-electronic appliances lasted for decades, too. (Even the electronics lasted a long time with occasional maintenance - which was required for vacuum tube based equipment - and was AVAILABLE.) Quite unlike the modern stuff. (My own family has been in our townhouse for about 17 years now and is on its third set of "stainless steel appliances", thanks to the rotten construction of post-outsourcing equipment by formerly high-end manufacturers. We're even on our third WATER HEATER: The brain of the new, governent mandated, eco-friendly, replacement flaked out after less than a year - and the manufacturer sent TWO MORE defective replacement brains and one defective gas sensor before lemon-replacing it.)

Comment Re:Yes, custom ROMs are still necessary (Score 1) 155

even Google itself washes their hands of any phone that is older than about 2 years.

Three years. Google devices get system upgrades for two years, and security updates for three years. That's still well short of five years, as you say. On the other hand, while Apple has a history of supporting devices for that long, they've made no commitment to any specific support timeline.

Comment Re:As someone with a masters in this -exact field- (Score 2) 195

you are a true master, you should be able to explain concepts in a way that even a child can understand. Richard Feynman was famous for this. So was Albert Einstein. Of course you can go too far, and simplify too much, so the children only think they understand.

Richard Feynman and Albert Einstein both did exactly this. You really can't understand quantum mechanics or general relativity without math. You can think you do, and both of them were great at providing simple explanations that gave the illusion of understanding... but it was only an illusion, which of course they knew perfectly well.

Comment Re:Deliberately missing the forest for the trees (Score 1) 314

"Yes, the weather is generally nice"

You're a liar. You've never actually been to San Francisco.

Also, why do you think it's worth your time to pontificate on why you don't understand why someone else likes something that you don't? I mean if you're really "just another old guy" surely you've gathered enough wisdom in your time on earth to realize that a lot of different people like a lot of different things, and if you can't understand why someone likes something, the reason is probably NOT because they are deluded, but it's actually because you're just not familiar enough with the thing to know it's good qualities, or maybe it's just fundamentally not your cup of tea.

I mean, seriously. I think your entire post was just to make yourself fell better about your house payment. That's how it reads anyway.

Comment Re:Just what we needed (Score 4, Insightful) 195

As a C++ programmer, I don't know if I'll ever use "concepts" in my own code.

That said, I'm nevertheless very much looking forward to them becoming part of the language, if only so that when I do something wrong when using an STL class, the compiler can come back with an error that tells me what I did wrong, rather then five pages of incomprehensible gibberish.

Many C++ features are like this, aimed not primarily at the average C++ user, but rather at the STL developers.

Comment Re:Gouge the middle class to make them poor (Score 4, Insightful) 208

It sounds more fair when you say charge less in poorer countries. However when you turn it around, it is gouge the people in less poor countries.

Especially given that GDP is not evenly distributed among the population. The bulk of the added revenue from technology driven productivity improvements (at least in the US) has gone to the denizens of the C suites and the government, not to the workers. GDP has soared while real-inflation adjusted after-tax income has stagnated or dropped for decades.

That's much of why a nuclear family in the '50s got along fine on a single income and a two-parent family now involves both parents working and the kids in child care, and the bulk of kids are in "non-traditional" family arrangements and/or on some form of public assistance.

So "gouge the developed world's middle class" is indeed what such a GDP-based scheme would accomplish.

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