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Submission + - LinkedIn Testing 1970's-Style No-CS-Degree-Required Software Apprenticeships

theodp writes: The Mercury News reports on REACH, a new software apprenticeship program that LinkedIn’s engineering team started piloting this month, which offers people without Computer Science degrees an opportunity to get a foot in the door, as Microsoft-owned LinkedIn searches for ways to help diversify its workforce. For now, the 29 REACH participants are paid, but are only short-term LinkedIn employees (for the duration of the 6-month program). LinkedIn indicated it hopes to learn if tech internships could eventually be made part of the regular hiring process, perhaps unaware that no-CS-degree-required hiring for entry-level permanent positions in software development was standard practice in the 70's and 80's, back when women made up almost 40% of those working as programmers and in software-related fields, nearly double the percentage of women in LinkedIn's global 2016 tech workforce. Hey, even in tech hiring, everything old is new again!

Submission + - Teenager arrested for 'swearing near pensioner' 1

oobayly writes: The Daily Telegraph reports that a Louisiana teenager has been arrested for swearing near 75 year old. According to the the Ouachita Parish Sheriff's Office the charge is for "DISTURBING THE PEACE / LANGUAGE/ Disorderly Conduct" and that:

While standing next to my 75 year-old complainant, Jared yelled the word "fuck" and clearly disturbed her peace.

As an outsider to the US — who is seriously envious of the 1st Amendment — how is this even an arrest-able office? Given that 43% Slashdot readers describe themselves as liberal/libertarian I doubt that many will support this — especially as Smith is only accused of shouting "fuck", not verbally abusing the lady — but is it likely the Sherif's office actually have a case?

Submission + - Physicists create negative mass (sciencedaily.com)

wisebabo writes: So, what's to keep me from getting a lot of this stuff (I know, the quantities that they have now are nanoscopic), putting it into a (very cold and well insulated) box and having it float upwards? (Antigravity). I mean gravity is a force and if this accelerates in the opposite direction then couldn't I harness it to do that?

Of course that means you could use it to make a machine that could generate energy from nothing so there must be a flaw in my reasoning somewhere. Also possibly useful for weight loss (if you could eat it).

Comment Bulletin board of drivers (Score 1) 145

Any legal action might be a tough sell. Both Uber and Lyft try to say that they are simply a bulletin board (a very modern one) that pairs riders and drivers. If you are a bulletin board, you cannot get angry at anybody coming over to look at your board and see what's going on, even if they are a competitor. It is public information after all.

Submission + - Brian Krebs is back online, with Google Cloud Hosting (krebsonsecurity.com)

Gumbercules!! writes: After the massive 600mbps DDOS on http://krebsonsecurity.com/ last week that forced Akamai to withdraw the (pro-bono) DDOS protection they offered the site, krebsonsecurity.com is now back online, hosted by Google.

Following Brian Krebs breaking an article on vDOS (https://developers.slashdot.org/story/16/09/08/2050238/israeli-ddos-provider-vdos-earned-600000-in-two-years), leading to the arrest of the two founders, his site was hit with a record breaking DDOS. It will certainly be an interesting test of Google's ability to provide DDOS protection to clients.

Submission + - SPAM: Obama used a pseudonym in emails with Clinton, FBI documents reveal

schwit1 writes: President Barack Obama used a pseudonym in email communications with Hillary Clinton and others, according to FBI records made public Friday. The disclosure came as the FBI released its second batch of documents from its investigation into Clinton’s private email server during her tenure as secretary of state.

The 189 pages the bureau released includes interviews with some of Clinton’s closest aides, such as Huma Abedin and Cheryl Mills; senior State Department officials; and even Marcel Lazar, better known as the Romanian hacker “Guccifer.”

In an April 5, 2016 interview with the FBI, Abedin was shown an email exchange between Clinton and Obama, but the longtime Clinton aide did not recognize the name of the sender.

"Once informed that the sender's name is believed to be pseudonym used by the president, Abedin exclaimed: 'How is this not classified?'" the report says. "Abedin then expressed her amazement at the president's use of a pseudonym and asked if she could have a copy of the email."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - White House Names First Federal CISO

wiredmikey writes: The White House today announced that Brigadier General (retired) Gregory J. Touhill has been named the first Federal Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). Back in February, President Barack Obama unveiled a cybersecurity "national action plan" (CNAP) which called for an overhaul of aging government networks and a high-level commission to boost security awareness. As part of the plan, the White House said it would hire a federal CISO to direct cybersecurity across the federal government. General Touhill is currently the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications in the Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C) at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

The key hire comes at a time when the government needs cybersecurity talent more than ever. Earlier this week a report published a U.S. House of Representatives Committee said the data breaches disclosed by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) last year were a result of culture and leadership failures, and should not be blamed on technology.

Submission + - Hot Debate Raging on The Proposed Super Particle Collider in China (scmp.com)

hackingbear writes: Chinese high-energy physicists proposed four years ago to build a particle collider four times the size of the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. On Sunday, Dr Yang Chen-ning, co-winner of the Nobel Prize in physics in 1957 and now living on campus at Tsinghua University in Beijing, released an article on WeChat opposing the construction of the collider. He said the project would become an investment “black hole” with little scientific value or benefit to society, sucking resources away from other research sectors such as life sciences and quantum physics. Yang’s article hit nearly all social media platforms and internet news portals, drawing tens of thousands of positive comments over the last couple of days. The first stage of the project was estimated to cost 40 billion yuan (US$6 billion) by 2030, and the total cost would exceed 140 billion yuan (US$21 billion) when construction is completed in 2050, making it the most expensive research facility built in China. Yang’s main argument was that China would not succeed where the United States had failed. A similar project had been proposed in the US but was eventually cancelled in 2012 as the construction far exceeded the initial budget. Yang said existing facilities including the Large Hadron Collider contributed little to the increase of human knowledge and was irrelevant to most people’s daily lives. But Dr Wang Yifang, lead scientist of the project with the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of High Energy Physics, argued research in high energy physics lead to the world wide web, mobile phone touch screens and magnetic resonance imaging in hospitals, among other technological breakthroughs.

Submission + - Did China suffer the first space launch failure of 2016? (gbtimes.com) 1

schwit1 writes: A scheduled Chinese launch has apparently ended in failure, though exactly what happened remains presently unknown.

China was early this morning expected to launch its Gaofen-10 Earth observation satellite from Taiyuan, following the issuance of an airspace exclusion zone days in advance. However, it seems the launch did not go to plan. Gaofen-10, nominally part of the ‘CHEOS’ Earth observation system for civilian purposes, was due to be launched on a Long March 4C rocket between 18:46 and 19:11 UTC on Wednesday (02:46-03:11 Thursday Beijing time). China usually releases information of launches once payloads are successfully heading towards their target orbits around an hour after launch. Much earlier, spectators and insiders often share details and photos of the launch on social media.

However, many hours after the launch window passed there was still silence, with the launch timing and location of the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Centre apparently limiting opportunities for outside viewers.

The launch however was not scrubbed, as first stage launch debris was found as expected along the flight path, suggesting that some failure occurred with the upper stage.

Like today’s Falcon 9 failure, this Chinese failure could have a rippling effect on their ambitious plans this fall, including the launch of their next space station followed by a 30-day manned mission.

Submission + - Clinton E-Mail server was hacked, so says the FBI (politico.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Politico has an article today which states that An unknown individual using the encrypted privacy tool Tor to hide their tracks accessed an email account on a Clinton family server, the FBI revealed Friday.

The FBI disclosed the event in its newly released report on the former secretary of state’s handling of classified information. According to the bureau’s review of server logs, someone accessed an email account on Jan. 5, 2013, using three IP addresses known to serve as Tor “exit nodes”

Submission + - Palo Alto, CA to ban software coding firms? (nytimes.com)

davemc writes: Palo Alto to ban software coding firms? Seems there is a little-known (and definitely not enforced) regulation on R&D. Including software coding. I guess the residents in Palo Alto already have their slice of the pie, so want to ban pies altogether.

"... the mayor is looking to enforce, in some form, an all-but-forgotten zoning regulation that bans companies whose primary business is research and development, including software coding. (To repeat: The mayor is considering enforcing a ban on coding at ground zero of Silicon Valley.)"

Submission + - Russians Hacked Arizona Voter Registration Database -Official (time.com)

alir1272 writes: Russians were responsible for the recent breach of Arizona’s voter registration system, the FBI told state officials in June.

Matt Roberts, a spokesman for Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan said on Monday that FBI investigators did not say whether the hackers were working for the Russian government or not, the Washington Post reported. He said hackers gained access after stealing the username and password of an election official in Gila County, rather than compromising the state or county system.

Comment Re:Well no kidding (Score 1) 94

I was about to mention NYC. I wouldn't say it works fine, but it does work better than most places. The subway stations also have a fairly restricted number of people at a time though, and that is where it works best for me. Also, not everybody business and local is trying to down on it 24/7. I wonder what the peak usage is? I guarantee it is much lower than other places.

Comment Re:"free" never fails to disapoint (Score 1) 94

His point is that the government will never had enough of oversight of itself -- it shouldn't have had this bad of a failure for so long -- to fix these problems. Saying it would all be better if the government just did something it historically never been able to do well is a fool's dream. Lacking a profit motive, governments have very little natural force correcting them, especially when it comes to bureaucrats paid according to union standards and protected by them. They really don't care if anything works out at long as then can show then put forth even the smallest effort.

You asking for more regulation after giving tax money to a corporation reminds me of the Ronald Reagan quote: "If is move, tax it. It is keeps moving, regulate it. If it stops moving, subsidize it."

The problem with government run anything (from democratic socialism to Marxism) is that it never works out like its planned, and those that support it just keep up with the same hitting their head again the wall mantra, "But that wasn't what was supposed to happen; that wasn't real [insert personal economic philosophy]." They never seem to learn that there will always be a huge gulf between theory and practice when it comes to the political economy. Capitalism self corrects around it and uses our worst side -- the greed -- to make the world better.

Submission + - Clean out Distros

wnfJv8eC writes: There needs to a user site to survey distro packages. I just went to remove xfsprogs, some hang over from SGI from the early, very early 2000s. Why is Gnome dependent on this package? Remove it, remove Gnome? Really? The dependency tree is all screwed up. Never mind XFS, which by now I can't imagine anyone using, why aren't such addons a plugin? Why are they still supported. Who uses them. Once Linux dropped support for minix. Now one used it.
It's time for a house cleaning. That starts with a good vote on what is and isn't being used. Then dependency trees can be corrected, not just grandfathered in.
There are many examples of stupid dependencies. For example Rhythmbox requires gvfs-afc, which rpm -qi describes as "This package provides support for reading files on mobile devices including phones and music players to applications using gvfs."
So if I never plug my phone or other mobile device into my computer to play music I must have this thing loaded and running? But remove gvfs-afc, and pull Rhythmbox. The dependency is all wrong.

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