Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! ×

Comment Re:This is why i didn't buy day 1 (Score 1) 62

Back in the day, we rarely had these problems with first day console released hardware. And when we had them, it was using bleeding edge technology (original Gameboy LCD screen recall). Where the hard break from this trend ended and began was after the 5th generation and beginning of the 6th generation consoles. It continues to this day. Software follows a similar pattern, but more egregious with the advent of the Internet; with the idea it can be patched later with quick delivery. In fact, auto-update is now expected in apps. But there's no excuse for sloppy electronic engineering and manufacturing; not in the year 2017 FFS!!!

Comment Probabilities (Score 1) 363

TFA: [A simulation] would require everything in the universe, at its smallest scale, has some definite property, some obvious state of yes or no. We already know that isn't true, explained Hossenfelder. There are few definite things in quantum mechanics, only probabilities. Elementary particles like electrons have a property called spin, for example. Quantum mechanics says that if we're not looking at the particles, we can't say what their spin value is, we can only model the probability of each spin value. That's what Schrodinger's cat is all about...

I don't see how that rules out simulation. Just because we "mortals" cannot see the probability computations doesn't mean they are not part of the simulation.

Further, some argue quantum physics supports the idea of simulation because it allows the details to remain fuzzy until somebody actually observes it. This is a common game strategy to avoid pre-building the details of an entire world: only fill in the details when the players get close to or enter something.

Comment Re:No complaints here (Score 1) 261

This is the 2nd winter in a row with less than average snow and higher than average temps. I certainly don't mind.

The best part is that it extends boating season by a month, another month when I get to run twin 350s and burn 20 gallons an hour!

If I can keep it up I may be able to warm it up to get another month!

Comment Charitable crime-fighting (Score 1) 277

"$450 billion ($1,800 per resident) per year from 1987–1990."

Yeah, and the next sentence explains that figure as: "These losses included $18 billion in medical and mental health care spending, $87 billion in other tangible costs, and $345 billion in pain, suffering, and reduced quality of life."

Different ways to count it can result in vastly different numbers — depending on what one wishes to demonstrate, ha-ha... The point remains, though, the cost of crime, however you count it, is still below the "commie socialist programs" that serviscope_minor attempted to justify.

And, the "war on poverty" isn't solely about reducing crime

Of course, it is not! Moreover, I argue, that it is not about reducing crime at all. It is about genuine compassion for some and the ability to spread the wealth around for others. That "spreading" of the wealth of captive taxpayers is pure unadulterated tyranny, of course, and the folks advocating it usually have a vast conflict of interest.

The overhead of charities ranges from 15% to as much as 70% — with government's operations being on the greater side of it. It is an incredibly lucrative and powerful position to be in control of spending even $1 billion, even if a mere $150 million of it are yours to dispense on the "overhead". With $800 billion per year you can find words, sponsor poems, finance movies and other artworks, and even find a smooth talking nincompoop, who will sincerely protect your trough, while denouncing opponents as greedy and egoistic bastards...

Comment Re:goodbye jiffy lube hello $60-$100 dealer oil ch (Score 1) 221

The problem is, does screaming legalese and acts of Congress when you're standing there in the dealership to pick up your car (late for daycare pickup or something) and some low-wage flunky is telling you that you owe $1,787 because the repair isn't covered by the warranty really get you very far?

Sure, you might be *right* but they can say no, not give you your car back until you pay, and generally make your life miserable until you sue them and then they can drag that out until it costs you 10x what the invoice was.

I recently had some work done where the invoice exceeded a written estimate by 20% and explaining the fact that such an overage is illegal in this state really was not effective. They were literally more afraid of me screaming on social media or disputing the charge on my card than they were in breaking the law.

The legalese is great idea, but unless you can call the cops and get somebody arrested for violating consumer protection laws, the imbalance between a large business and the average consumer is so great that its almost like having no protection at all.

Comment Re:Features? Look Elsewhere (Score 1) 210

I was thinking about this yesterday in a similar way, how once a product's core functionality reaches a certain level you reach a point in its life cycle where as a user you're at risk of significant instability.

Inevitably the desire to add new features to justify additional licensing fees will lead to the "need" to rewrite or significantly restructure the core functionality and they never get that right the first time, often plunging products back to levels of instability not seen in many versions. And often not fixed for a long time, either, as feature bloat dilutes engineering resources and product managers and marketing fall on their sword to preserve the new version.

I sometimes wonder if a strategy to deal with this wouldn't be planning on switching to a rising competitor, even if it meant suffering a competitor's marginally lower stability. The idea being that the competitor hasn't hit a functionality & stability plateau yet and will be mostly increasing stability first and functionality second.

Comment Re: Presumption of innocence (Score 1) 445

Thank you for the compliment, however foul-mouthed, but... With that freedom to endanger oneself, comes the responsibility to pay for one's own healthcare and/or disability. Pay for it, or beg other people's charity — with Pauper's Oath, etc. — but not vote to force others to pay for one's follies.

I sure hope, you are just as prepared to agree with this...

Comment Libertarianism 101 (Score 1) 277

Among those laws was the 1979 Department of Education Organization Act that established that entity.

Yep. As I said: a mission creep. Government looking, what else it can do...

The rules are simple. If (what seems like) a problem:

  • does not endanger the nation's very survival;
  • can be solved by private entities — commercial or charitable;

then the government must not touch it.

For the government to violate this principle is tyranny — taxpayer's money is confiscated to pay for things, he would not have paid for voluntarily.

And, like all other tyrannies, it is also inefficient. Your own example of public education is an ongoing disaster: per-pupil costs of public schools have quadrupled since the 1960-ies (inflation-adjusted), but 70% of the 8th-graders still can not be said to be "proficient" in reading.

Space-exploration is fascinating — leave it to Musk, Bezos, and Branson. They spend their own monies on it...

Comment Scale it... (Score 1) 236

Who really cares if I can get a loop to run in 800ns instead of 1500ns

Indeed. A human being can not even perceive a difference between 1 millisecond and 1 microsecond.

But, repeated a million times, the former turns into 15 minutes, whereas the latter is still merely a second. Food for thought...

Slashdot Top Deals

"Marriage is low down, but you spend the rest of your life paying for it." -- Baskins

Working...