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Comment Re:Heads-up Texas Holdem (Score 1) 156

You have never done any game development, it's obvious.

The step from single-player game to multiplayer game is not a simple upgrade, it's a complete shift in everything. It requires a completely different approach, not a refined version of the same approach.

In any non-trivial multiplayer game, the interactions between all the players matter, and the complexity of those is subject to combinatorial explosion. Poker being a relatively low-interaction game will not make this as bad as some others, but beating one person and beating a table of people is not the same system with a little more cycles, it quite possibly requires a different approach altogether.

It will be interesting to see the jump happen, but it is a jump, not a step.

AI beating humans at a game is merely a beta test. The real application will feed unending greed, which will never die.

Greed is a game.

Comment Re:saving money (Score 1) 109

Is that US-only or is that the story they are telling?

I look at Spain and Italy and Greece and while they didn't have the best economy to start with, it was the bailouts that did them in.

I also wonder, where did these billions come from? The stock exchange is a zero-sum game. So who paid these billions to the taxpayer?

Comment test run (Score 1) 199

Which manufacturing capacity does ISIS have left? Which engineers have not yet run away from the sinking ship?

Someone is using ISIS as a test run for their latest toy, and it's not the Russians (they would test by themselves). Expect the US or some of its allies to use weaponized small drones in the next war against the next terrorists, the result of "years of military research".

Comment Re:Compromise (Score 4, Informative) 114

Different problem.

Yes, the provider could initiate a man-in-the-middle attack against all users from the start. However, let us assume that he didn't do that, for various reasons that are for a seperate discussion.

In such a scenario, Alice conversation with Bob is secure. It requires only the initial secure key exchange. Once that is complete, they are fine.

But with the backdoor of silent key-renegotiation, the provider can at any time decide that now they want to eavesdrop into this or that conversation. Say, because a government agency asked them nicely, or a FB employee looked up that woman he met last night in the database and found her WhatsApp number...

It is a different scenario with different ramifications.

Comment missing the point (Score 4, Informative) 114

He is missing the point.

The article is not speaking about an encryption flaw or anything like that, but about a backdoor - a feature that allows Facebook, without any code changes on your device or other intrusion - to eavesdrop on any conversation you are having.

A good encryption would be impenetrable even to the vendor. It should not allow the keys to be changed underneath you. It should not warn you afterwards about this fact, and only if you have a special option enabled, but it should tell you before it does a key change, and require your consent.

Comment Re: Unlimited? (Score 1) 196

Small cells negate the "limited amount of spectrum" argument. It's a financial + logistical + political/regulatory limitation, not a technical one.

Technology will eventually advance to the point that the financial consideration is less important. We're already working with beam-forming -- a technology that's existed for decades, in radar applications -- for instance. Wireless is the future, no matter what the naysayers think, and if you're still thinking of "spectrum" as the limiting factor you're behind the curve. Makes me think of the folks who deploy IPv6 for the first time and start worrying about the "waste" of addresses.

Comment Re:Unlimited? (Score 1) 196

There's no technical reason why an LTE network can't be engineered to provide truly unlimited data with acceptable speeds in most instances. There is, however, a financial reason, plus the usual regulatory/political concerns that get in the way of new cell sites. It's worth noting that T-Mobile manages to offer unlimited with an asterisk (video throttled to 1.5Mbps) and in many cases delivers superior speed than Verizon, so it's clearly POSSIBLE and PROFITABLE to use as a business model.

In rural/fixed-wireless settings LTE is actually cheaper than DSL/cable and the favorable contention ratios (i.e., low population density) make unlimited possible with today's network. It's a mystery to me why they won't offer an unlimited product for this market segment at least; it would be the death blow for satellite internet.

Comment Re:Lame (Score 1) 168

>Less space than a Nomad

In all fairness, I rarely need to control more than one starship in battle at a time with my phone, so a fraction of Nomad's space works fine . . .

hawk

Comment Re:Only remove it for California (Score 1) 218

> But the 1st amendment is not a law in that respect

Yes, it is, as applied through the 14th, as are all other parts of the Bill of Rights "fundamental to the concept of ordered liberty." [*]

hawk, esq.

[*] And the establishment clause, which is applied, well, whenever a court feels like it . . .

Comment Re:Only remove it for California (Score 1) 218

>Well Hollywood better put a goddamn end to the
>practice. I, for one, am sick and tired of Hollywood
>using actual children to portray children in movies
>and television. They should be using only actors
>above the age of 18.

Uhm, isn't that that Matthew Broderick is for?

Although I think he's finally ready to play college students instead of high school . . . :)

hawk

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