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Security

Submission + - Diablo 3 Servers Hacked 1

Hyppy writes: Hundreds (thousands) of users have reportedly been hacked simultaneously this weekend, less than a week after Diablo 3 was released. Dozens of threads on the official Diablo 3 forums created over the past 48 hours have been censored by Blizzard customer service officials. Interestingly enough, many players have Blizzard's SecurID-styled Authenticator on their accounts, bringing into question both Blizzard's security and that of the Authenticators.
IT

Submission + - "Configuring VMware" for the complete idiot

bradley13 writes: Another virtualization question... On the side, I play "sys admin" for a micro-company of 3-4 employees. This company has an old VB6 application that they still support, and until now the old Visual Studio and all associated tools have remained installed on the two developers' systems. This summer, it's time to replace the computers, and — because of the numerous problems with running an ancient Visual Studio, Tools, etc. next to more modern versions — I want to create a VMware instance that can be loaded up on the two developer systems "as needed" to maintain the old software. One developer works mainly under Ubuntu, the other under Windows.

This VMware instance, once everything is in place, will access a VSS repository plus home directories across the network. I intend to have it revert-to-snapshop after every execution — it should be able to live on unchanged for years. I have used the free VMware server a couple of times, for example, to set up test instances of various SQL Server environments, but we're talking maybe 8 hours per year of time I spend with it. It's mostly called "accept the defaults and pray".

Could Slashdot experts provide a list of "tips for the complete idiot" on how to set up VMware server instances so that they perform well, and will continue to do so for the long term?

Submission + - Target pharmacy begins scanning driver's licences 2

Muad'Dave writes: This evening I picked up my regular prescriptions at my local Target pharmacy. As I was paying for them, the cashier asked to 'see my ID'. That was not typical, but I assumed she was going to verify the photo. Before I could stop her, she flipped it over without looking at the front and scanned the 2D barcode on the back. I asked her why she did that, and her answer was that the system 'required' it.

I went to the customer service desk and asked them why they thought they were entitled to scan my license. Their first answer was that it was a convenient way to validate my birthday, and that was all that was on the 2D barcode. When I mentioned that I know there's more data than that, she then said that it was a convenient way to verify that the ID was present. I mentioned that verifying the presence of an ID required more data than the DOB, and she agreed, contradicting her earlier statement that all they scanned was the DOB.

The is a Federal law addressing who can and cannot scan licenses, but it's so full of loopholes as to be useless.

Apparently I'm not the only one bothered by their attitude on privacy.

Have you been subjected to this invasion of your privacy by Target?

Submission + - The Terrorists are Winning (slashdot.org) 4

headkase writes: Ask Slashdot indeed. If you travel by plane then you have a vested interest in this story. The terrorists are winning. The purpose of terrorism is not to kill as many people as possible but rather to disrupt the systems of your enemy. In the United States terrorists have succeeded brilliantly. The main agency formed to combat terrorism, the TSA, is a reactionary organization. It does not operate by logic but rather operates by "theater". Its purpose is to say that "something is being done" is more important than actually doing something. The TSA is being manipulated by terrorists. Terrorists are succeeding is disrupting the lives and quality of life of millions of Americans daily. Jerks. This "Ask Slashdot" is to generate ideas and seed them into the wider Internet community so that the purposes of terrorism can be more effectively negated. Please contribute any suggestion, criticize and build on any others, and in general act like a Citizen instead of a sheep. Thank you.

Submission + - Wikipedia: No such thing as Medieval Warm Period

zulux writes: In a manner startlingly reminiscent of Orwell's Memory Hole, Wikipedia's articles have been purged of most references to the Mideval Warm Period and Little Ice Age in order to bolster the current threat of Global Warming. According to The National Post "Connolley created or rewrote 5,428 unique Wikipedia articles. His control over Wikipedia was greater still, however, through the role he obtained at Wikipedia as a website administrator, which allowed him to act with virtual impunity. When Connolley didn’t like the subject of a certain article, he removed it — more than 500 articles of various descriptions disappeared at his hand. When he disapproved of the arguments that others were making, he often had them barred — over 2,000 Wikipedia contributors who ran afoul of him found themselves blocked from making further contributions."

Read more: http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/12/18/370719.aspx#ixzz0acuhm3RB
The Courts

Submission + - SPAM: FTC rules outlaw damned annoying robocalls on 9.1

coondoggie writes: "Nearly a year after announcing the plan, new Federal Trade Commission rules prohibiting most robocalls are set to take effect Tuesday, Sept. 1. With the rules, prerecorded commercial telemarketing robocalls will be prohibited, unless the telemarketer has obtained permission in writing from consumers who want to receive such calls. Hopefully the rules will go a long way to helping consumers eat dinner in peace without being interrupted by amazingly annoying telemarketer blather or in this case prerecorded blather. The requirement is part of amendments to the agency's Telemarketing Sales Rule (TSR) that were announced a year ago. After September 1, sellers and telemarketers who transmit prerecorded messages to consumers who have not agreed in writing to accept such messages will face penalties of up to $16,000 per call. [spam URL stripped]"
Link to Original Source
Portables (Apple)

Submission + - When iPods Go Boom! Apple Goes Shhhh..... 2

TechnoGrl writes: The http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/personal_tech/article6736587.ece >London Times Online reports that, when Mr. Ken Stanborough tried to get a simple refund from Apple after his iPod exploded and caught fire, Apple responded by demanding that Mr. Stanborough first sign an agreement that he never talk about the incident. Mr. Stanborough responded by talking to the Times saying ,

"They're putting a life sentence on myself, my daughter and Ellie's mum, not to say anything to anyone. ... We didn't ask for compensation, we just asked for our money back".

Think Different?

I Think Not.

Security

Free Rainbow Tables Looking For New Admin 95

lee writes "After almost three years online, the admin of Free Rainbow Tables has decided to call it a day, citing a lack of time to keep it running. (I'm sure that you all know a rainbow table is essentially a giant list of precomputed hashes.) This is a shame, as the site is a useful resource for those occasions when you really need an existing password exposed, rather than simply changing it. I'm a Windows admin, and this site has come in very handy in the past. The currently computed tables weigh in at well over half a terabyte, are available as torrents from the site, or from a couple of mirrors (and alternatives are available). When the site was active, it featured a downloadable BOINC client to put your idle cycles to work computing ever-greater tables, and a space-saving format for storing the tables. The admin is willing to hand over source code if you wish to take over, though I suspect hosting is not included!"
Security

Submission + - Free rainbow tables looking for new admin (freerainbowtables.com)

lee writes: After almost three years online, the admin of Free Rainbow Tables has decided to call it a day, citing a lack of time to keep it running (I'm sure that you all know a rainbow table is essentially a giant list of precomputed hashes). This is a shame, as the site is a useful resource for those occasions when you really need an existing password exposing rather than simply changing it; being a Windows admin, this site has come in very handy in the past! The currently computed tables weigh in at well over half a terabyte, are available as torrents from the site, or from a couple of mirrors (and alternatives are available). As well as being useful in that you can download your own copies of the tables, the site also has a downloadable client that'll put your idle cycles to work computing ever-greater tables, and a space-saving format for storing the tables. It's not all bad news though — he is willing to hand over source code if you wish to take over, though I suspect hosting is not included!
The Courts

Submission + - Australian website bans Australians

Nazlfrag writes: Earlier this month the blog and discussion forum ZGeek was sued for $42 million AUD over a users comment. The plaintiffs are aspiring movie producers who claim to have lost a movie deal due to a 9/11 conspiracy discussion thread. Even though the initial lawsuit has been thrown out and the company complied with lawyers demands by taking down the offending posts it is believed the plaintiffs will file suit again. In addition to suing the forum, in an Australian first they have been granted an injunction to force the ISPs to disclose the IP addresses of the two posters involved. Due to the risk of incurring even greater legal costs the company is closing its doors in Australia and will ban their fellow countrymen from posting there again.
The Courts

Submission + - RIAA Loses Bid To Keep Revenues Secret (blogspot.com) 1

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "The RIAA's motion to keep secret the record companies' 1999-to-date revenues for the copyrighted song files at the heart of the case has been denied, in the Boston case scheduled for trial July 27th, SONY BMG Music Entertainment v. Tenenbaum. The Judge had previously ordered the plaintiff record companies to produce a summary of the 1999-to-date revenues for the recordings, broken down into physical and digital sales. On the day the summary was due to be produced, instead of producing it, they produced a 'protective order motion' asking the Judge to rule that the information would have to be kept secret. The Judge rejected that motion : 'the Court does not comprehend how disclosure would impair the Plaintiffs' competitive business prospects when three of the four biggest record labels in the world — Warner Bros. Records, Sony BMG Music Entertainment, and UMG Recording, Inc. — are participating jointly in this lawsuit and, presumably, would have joint access to this information.'"
The Courts

Submission + - US gouple gets prison time for Internet obscenity (idg.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "The husband and wife owners of a California company that distributed pornographic materials over the Internet have been each sentenced to one year and one day in prison. Extreme Associates and owners Robert Zicari, also known as Rob Black, 35, and his wife, Janet Romano, aka Lizzie Borden, 32, pleaded guilty in March to a felony charge of conspiracy to distribute obscene material through the mail and over the Internet."
Networking

Submission + - Comcast intercepts and redirects port 53 traffic (wordpress.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: An interesting (and profane) writeup of one frustrated user's discovery that Comcast is actually intercepting DNS requests bound for non-Comcast DNS servers and redirecting them to their own servers. I had obviously heard of the DNS hijacking for nonexistent domains, but I had no idea they'd actually prevent people from directly contacting their own DNS servers.

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