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Comment Re:Yes but (Score 5, Interesting) 459

Thought experiment. Let's suppose you're a CIVIL engineer -- the type of engineer the regulations are intended to target. You're on vacation in Oregon, and you notice a serious structural fault in a bridge which means that it is in imminent danger of collapse.

Under this interpretation of the term "practice engineering" you wouldn't be able to tell anyone because you're not licensed to practice engineering in Oregon. In fact anyone who found an obvious fault -- say, a crack in the bridge -- would be forbidden to warn people not to use it until it had been looked at.

Which is ridiculous. Having and expressing an opinion, even a professionally informed opinion, isn't "practicing engineering". Practicing engineering means getting paid -- possibly in some form other than money. At the very least it means performing the kind of services for which engineers are normally paid.

A law which prevented people from expressing opinions wouldn't pass constitutional muster unless it was "narrowly tailored to serve a compelling public interest" -- that's the phrase the constitutional lawyers use when talking about laws regulating constitutionally protected activities. In this case the public interest is safety, which would be served by a law which prevented unqualified people from falsely convincing people that a structure was safe. But there is no compelling interest in preventing an engineer from warning the public about something he thinks is dangerous or even improper.

So if the law means what they claim it to mean, it's very likely unconstitutional.

Comment Re: How can they patent it? (Score 1) 68

You might tell that to India. Parts of traditional medicine involving plants that grow locally have been patented by US companies. India objected and was ignored.

Note that in this case neither the use nor the product were either discovered or invented by the US patent holder. Check Tree-tea oil, for one example. (Unless it's Tea-tree oil.)

Comment Re:Good Idea (Score 1) 46

Having to print out the html pages is unreasonable. Having to print a pdf would not be unreasonable.

Possibly after I'd installed Gentoo once or twice I'd feel confident enough that I wouldn't think I needed the instructions in front of me as I did it, but just now I would want the full instructions. Which is why I said "a second computer on your desk".

P.S.: Why you format your disk, and have a boot disk, it's difficult to tell what info you are going to need to proceed in a way you haven't previously gone. You don't *KNOW* what info you are going to need. Before I get in that situation I like to have a visible plan of action. Thus a printed pdf would be reasonable. I don't have a phone or tablet that would act as a surrogate internet browser. So I want a printed copy of instructions before I get into something really new.

Submission + - Murdered woman's Fitbit nails cheating husband

BarbaraHudson writes: A murdered woman's Fitbit data shows she was still alive an hour after her husband claims she was murdered and he was tied up, contradicting her husband's description of events.

Richard Dabate, 40, was charged this month with felony murder, tampering with physical evidence and making false statements following his wife Connie's December 2015 death at their home in Ellington, Tolland County.

Dabate called 911 reporting that his wife was the victim of a home invasion, alleging that she was shot dead by a "tall, obese man" with a deep voice like actor Vin Diesel's, sporting "camouflage and a mask," according to an arrest warrant.

Dabate alleged her death took place more than an hour before her Fitbit-tracked movements revealed.

Submission + - Why Did Google Really Block A Guerrilla Fighter In The Ad War? (fastcompany.com)

tedlistens writes: Google's decision to ban the Chrome plug-in AdNauseum due to a violation of its "single purpose policy"—shortly after the app began supporting the EFF's new Do Not Track standard—was only the latest salvo in an ongoing war over online advertising. The ad industry knows that ads are a nuisance, and it's now taking pre-emptive measures to make them more palatable—or, in Google's case, to block the unpalatable ones. But Google's positions also point to a crucial disagreement at the heart of the ad war: What makes ads such a nuisance to begin with?

Ads aren't just ugly, annoying, and bandwidth-sucking: They pose a risk to privacy, as the networks of software behind ads—cookies, trackers, and malware—watch not only where you go on the web but, through your phone and your purchases, what you do in real life. But privacy is largely missing from Google's discussion of problematic ads, says Howe. By avoiding mentioning AdNauseum's actual intent, Google's explanation for banning it echoes the advertising industry's discussion of web ads, which focuses on aesthetics rather than privacy.

Submission + - Windows 95 and 98 still power Pentagon's critical systems

SmartAboutThings writes: The Pentagon is set to complete its Windows 10 transition by the end of this year, but nearly 75% of its control system devices still run Windows XP or other older versions, including Windows 95 and 98. A Pentagon official now wants the bug bounty program of the top U.S. defense agency expanded to scan for vulnerabilities in its critical infrastructure.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Cheaper cellphone and internet? 3

An anonymous reader writes: I pay $50 a month to AT&T for cellular service, and $60 a month to Comcast for Internet access. I don't have or want a smartphone, and use maybe 10% of my call minutes every month, and have a bare-bones plan. I use the Internet lightly, and would be happy with DSL speeds instead of 8Mb/S if it were cheaper, but can't completely get rid of Internet access entirely. How can I make these cheaper?

Comment Incompetent Board of Directors? (Score 1) 154

I know what you're saying. But the big question is, why did the Yahoo Board of Directors make such a HUGE mistake.

A few of the Marissa Meyer stories, over several years. Major problems were reported almost 5 years ago:

The Truth About Marissa Mayer: She Has Two Contrasting Reputations (Jul. 17, 2012) Quote: "She used to make people line up outside of her office, sit on couches and sign up with office hours with her. Then everybody had to publicly sit outside her office and she would see people in five minute increments. She would make VPs at Google wait for her. It's like you've got to be kidding."

Yahoo! CEO Mayer Is Delusional and Must Go - RealMoney.com (Oct. 21, 2015)

Marissa Mayer: A Case Study In Poor Leadership - Forbes (Nov. 20, 2015) Five reasons people don't like Yahoo's Marissa Mayer (Oct. 7, 2016)

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer led illegal purge of male employees, lawsuit charges (Oct. 6, 2016)

How was Marissa Mayer viewed within Google? - Quora

What made Marissa Mayer an incompetent CEO? - Quora

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Thoroughly Failed on Promise to Not Screw Up Tumblr (Jun. 16 2016)

Comment Re:AI killing industry (Score 1) 120

Except in a real movie, you wouldn't just take the audio stream straight from the algorithm; you'd have some kind of highly skilled specialist tweaking it to get the exact effect the director wanted.

A combination of art and science will eventually be able to produce completely convincing audio forgeries, very likely long before science alone will be able to.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Concidence or Questionable Data Harvesting?

FerociousFerret writes: I haven't been to P.F. Chang's in something like 15 years. I went with my brother and friends on Sunday. On Monday I receive an email from P.F. Changs (noreply@pfchangs.fbmta.com) with a promotional coupon. I have never received an email from P.F. Changs before. I mentioned the email offer to my brother who does programming work in the banking industry and the first thing he said was "You paid with your credit card". I was the only one to use a credit card and the only one to receive an offer by email from P.F. Changs. But how did they connect the credit card to my email? Well, I am signed up for the Pei Wei rewards program and get fairly regular emails from them (peiwei@peiwei.fbmta.com) with offers and such. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, Inc. owns and operates two restaurant concepts in the Asian niche: P.F. Chang's® and Pei Wei®. Looks like a clear case of data harvesting and matching up my name and credit card to my Pei Wei account to send me P.F. Chang offers. If my credit card is being used for anything other than making the payment transaction, it would seem like some questionable data harvesting and privacy issue. Thoughts?

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