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Comment Re:Android CUPS Printing (Score 1) 72

Android CUPS Printing. Advertises through AVAHI, works on Smart Phones, solves the problem. No Google involvement.

My Android phone with the HP print service installed just finds my HPLJ2300 on the network. No server involvement, beyond the Jetdirect card. ISTR paying $200 for it, and then I went ahead and ponied up another hundred bucks for an additional tray, a postscript DIMM, and a 128MB DIMM.

Comment I'd have paid that in a geek house (Score 1) 314

Back when I lived at the Marshmallow Peanut Circus near downtown Santa Cruz, CA, yes I would have paid that — or rather, my share of it. With six of us in the house and a fairly decent television (and pretty nice stereo), $25 would have been a shoo-in and even $50 would probably have been feasible for some pictures. But there would have been some conditions. Wave a wand and ignore the technical restrictions of doing this in the early 2000s; it would have had to have been as good quality as rental, and it would have had to have been downloaded ahead because you still can't trust streaming now and we didn't actually have the bandwidth to do it back then.

If I'm not trying to see the movie with other people, then I can wait. I don't need to see it when it comes out if I'm going to see it at home anyway.

As others have suggested, I would pay a premium to get to stream the movie early, provided I had a physical disc coming to me when it was released. But I wouldn't pay so much only to watch the movie. For $25 I might even accept a DVD, if it were an anamorphic transfer and came with DTS audio. For $50 I expect a Blu-Ray.

Perhaps my expectations are high. So be it.

Comment Re:Science coverage with AD (Score 1) 122

apparently, study of ancient history falls apart if we require the kind of proof that you're looking for for a historical jesus.

That's fine. We should require that kind of proof. Otherwise, it should be acknowledged to be the study of mythology, and the places in which it intersects with observable reality.

AI

AI Will Disrupt How Developers Build Applications and the Nature of the Applications they Build (zdnet.com) 86

AI will soon help programmers improve development, says Diego Lo Giudice, VP and principal analyst at Forrester, in an article published on ZDNet today. He isn't saying that programmers will be out of jobs soon and AIs will take over. But he is making a compelling argument for how AI has already begun disrupting how developers build applications. An excerpt from the article: We can see early signs of this: Microsoft's Intellisense is integrated into Visual Studio and other IDEs to improve the developer experience. HPE is working on some interesting tech previews that leverage AI and machine learning to enable systems to predict key actions for participants in the application development and testing life cycle, such as managing/refining test coverage, the propensity of a code change to disrupt/break a build, or the optimal order of user story engagement. But AI will do much more for us in the future. How fast this happens depends on the investments and focus on solving some of the harder problems, such as "unsupervised deep learning," that firms like Google, FaceBook, Baidu and others are working on, with NLP linguists that are too researching on how to improve language comprehension by computers leveraging ML and neural networks. But in the short term, AI will most likely help you be more productive and creative as a developer, tester, or dev team rather than making you redundant.

Comment Re:So. 50,000 more H1-B visas need to be issued (Score 1) 321

Go back a year ago, even at rallies when he was talking about the wall he said there would be breaks for natural barriers. You're moving the goalposts.

If those breaks are patrolled with the same fervency as a border crossing, then I'll allow it. Otherwise, the whole thing is even more of a sham than I thought.

Comment Re:Science coverage with AD (Score 1) 122

... revisionism at its best. was christ born in that vicinity of years? yes, the man later to be known as christ was born in a 30 year window of that time.

[citation needed]

There is not one single historical point of evidence for the man's existence. Every supposed eyewitness account is from the same collection of related works allegedly created by three authors. I love the idea of Jesus Christ as much as the next guy, but there is literally no historical evidence for his existence. The closest thing you get is one historian repeating hearsay.

This doesn't mean there was no Christ. The absence of evidence is not the same as incontrovertible evidence of absence. But please, let's at least try and stick with facts here. I know, I know. I must be new here.

Comment Re:Banish cars from the city center (Score 1) 227

Plus also, you have to be really pretty rural before you can't get things delieved.

You don't have to be very far before it becomes much more expensive, though. Since I live in a crappy little county with a crappy little retail store selection, I can only have most large things shipped to a freight depot. Some people will ship them to the foot of my driveway, but they can't get a big truck up it.

This is not about me, though, this is about the city. And if you seldom leave it, and you happen to live where you can walk to work or where public transportation works for you then yes, it surely makes sense to have no car. In a lot of cities, it's not reasonable to relocate to be closer to work — finding any housing at all is often an epic struggle. So we're going to need either to fix that problem, or to build public transportation systems which actually let people go where they need to go in a timely fashion. For example, it has to be faster than walking. Certainly in San Francisco that is often not the case, depending on which boroughs you're traveling between.

Even with the rentals, I spend much, much less per year than I would on maintainance, insurance, road tax etc.

In the USA we pay the same road tax regardless of whether we own the vehicle. Our registration fees only pay for... well, they don't apparently pay for much of anything actually. But that's another rant. EVs will cut maintenance costs. Insurance is based on the number of miles driven.

And, I can also rent an appropriate vehicle for the journey, like a nice long wheelbase transit if I'm moving big things or a normal car for simply getting me somewhere.

If you're commonly making trips which can be made in a total econobox then that can be viable. If you are commonly making trips which require a larger vehicle, that becomes prohibitively expensive in fairly short order. I, for one, am two meters tall, and I always require a larger vehicle. Only a very few mid-size vehicles are even large enough inside to accommodate me. Nissan and Subaru are the only Japanese manufacturers which leave enough space for a human of my dimensions, for example, in anything other than the largest vehicles from a luxury sub-marque. In Panama I was able to rent an Almera (Sentra) at one point and that was not great but okay, but then I got stuck with a Yaris later and it was a knee-cramping nightmare.

There are lots of considerations which might lead people to need to own a car even if they live in a city. Most of them could be eliminated by implementing elevated PRT, for those people who tend to stay within its borders.

Comment Re:So. 50,000 more H1-B visas need to be issued (Score 1) 320

I get it, you're opposed to Trump ideologically. But you have to stop saying retarded things like "you can't build a wall" or no one will ever take you seriously again, and you'll keep losing.

Tell you what. I'll bet you a dollar that we never build a contiguous wall under a Trump or even Pence presidency. It doesn't have to be effective for you to win this bet. It only has to be without breaks which are not intentional. (Border crossings are permitted, so long as a highway or equivalent runs through them, and they are patrolled.) I'm allowing for the apparent attempt to build a wall, so it really does have to reach completion.

Comment Re:Performance? (Score 1) 84

The applications that lose in this scenario are the ones the rely on raw single thread performance. Certainly some games are in this camp, but many games which make efficient use of threads are not.

It's not that simple. Games are multithreaded now, yes, but they do not have a crapload of threads which can make use of a crapload of cores. If you're taking a substantial clock rate hit and another substantial hit from translation overhead, the truth is that it's not just the high-end games which are going to suffer, nor the low-end ones, but any of them which are not very old — as defined by coming from the era when PCs had even lower clock rates. It's already true that Intel processors with less cores still beat AMD processors in gaming benchmarks, notably in the area of minimum frame rate — the torque of graphics performance, where the max frame rate is horsepower. We all like high max frame rates, but high minimum frame rates are what really matter. (price:performance is also relevant, which is why I went AMD anyway; both CPU and motherboard are cheaper, which translates into a big savings at the system price level. I am not in competition, and I can live with slightly degraded graphics.)

Comment Re:God no (Score 3, Interesting) 91

I have 2 AMD cards on a windows 10 and windows 7 machines, never had any of these issues. Sounds like you just suck

I've never not had these problems. I've never had AMD drivers work properly without being hacked up by DnA. AMD has been crashing Windows for me since the Mach32 and Windows 3.1. (Don't even get me started on all the different Mach64 chipsets with different drivers.)

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