Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! ×

Comment RPG will take that out in a heartbeat. (Score 1) 90

The police wants to escalate to that level, Then the Unrest will also.

Cops with full battle armor are a danger to society, it means the ones that think they need to defend themselves from the police will up their game to a 308 high power hunting rifle that will rip through Military armor like butter, or start using Armor piercing 5.56/7.62 home made rounds.

Want to keep a crowd calm, you don't freaking roll in like storm troopers hell bent on extermination.

In he countries it's built in, RPG's are not hard to come by, hell even a home made IED would take that thing out.

Comment Re:Uhm... (Score 1) 385

Nonsense. Barack Obama, George W Bush, Bill Clinton, George HW Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and Richard Nixon all lied plenty but none - not even Nixon - have come out with as much nonsense as Donald Trump.

I always feel the most ardent Trump supporters don't understand what a false dichotomy is. Because they believed others have lied, they must that Trump is always telling the truth. No, Trump lies regularly but they won't admit it.

Comment Re:Percentage doesn't matter (Score 1) 109

Oh, I think the percentage bit is significant. It shouldn't be news that they've acknowledged reality; but it's remarkable that their responses is so meaningless.

It makes me wonder whether this is just marketing BS or whether they're really that incoherent about strategy.

Many proprietary software companies have prospered in an era of open source acceptance -- even when very good free software alternatives for their products exists (Microsoft, Oracle). But although we don't tend to think of them that way, they tend to be value-priced. You get a lot of (not necessarily great) software engineering for your $199 Windows license fee.

But the play this game you need scale to amortize development costs over many users. If you have more of a niche product competing against a solid open source competitor is going to be really, really hard. As in SAS charges almost $9000 for a single seat license, and that's good for only a year; thereafter you'll have to fork over thousands of dollars every year. That kind of cash pays for a lot of R training.

Comment Re:A way better solution (Score 1) 254

Really?

In the UK, red means DO NOT CROSS the line of the traffic light. If you're already past the line by the time it goes red, you're on your own (e.g. traffic jam in front but no yellow box forcing you to keep the junction clear and nothing moves for a whole phase) but it's not an offence.

The problem is the latter. The cameras check if you are in the intersection on red, so if you cross on yellow, and don't get out (easy if the yellow is too short).

Btw, you are not supposed to enter the intersection unless you can pass all the way through, if you end up being stuck due to a traffic jam you are also breaking the law.

Comment Re:Maybe they shouldn't use Javascript ... (Score 1) 224

Why the hell would anything be in the CPU's memory when you're rendering the screen? All of this should be happening on the GPU, without any bitting of things from CPU memory.

Because that is how most 2D rendering works and how Chrome works (which this product uses). It is rendered with CPU based rasterization to tiles which are uploaded to the GPU and then composited by the GPU.Unless the you disable GPU compositing, then there is also a CPU based fallback.

Note, my base assumption is still that they are doing it wrong and stupidly. Rerendering the entire screen on CPU 60fps. That would fit with 12% CPU. A smart CPU rerendering would only rerender the pixels changing (which is easy on CPU based algorithms because there is no double buffering) and use 0.1% CPU, a smart GPU based rerendering would rerender the entire screen but still use less than 0.1% CPU because only GPU instructions would be issued.

Comment Re:As unpopular as it will be to hear... (Score 1) 109

It still depends. There are a lot of factors. And quite frankly how the product is licensed is way down on the bottom of conserned. Most organizations are able to negotiate better contract with these companies. Do you think a 1,000+ employee companies will be using standard windows licenses? No they will negotiate with Microsoft for a license and conditions that fit there needs. With FOS it is what you get that comes with it. If it is GNU you better be sure that you don't use it in your product if you want to sell it. BSD, MIT and Apache licenses also have their own issues but you get what you get and often have little chance to negotiate with someone to make it suit your needs.
There are costs to an organization that isn't to the individual. For the individual the time wasted learning a FOS software is their own time and often enjoyable hobby. But to a company have to pay someone to learn this is expensive and there are factors such as product lifespan, and ability to find employees who knows how to use that tool and training resources available. All these factors makes the license cost a drop in the bucket.
Not FOS is overall a good thing and companies shouldn't shy away from it there are a lot of professional tools out there that can save you a ton of money. However not all of them.

Comment Re:Maybe they shouldn't use Javascript ... (Score 1) 224

Why the hell would anything be in the CPU's memory when you're rendering the screen? All of this should be happening on the GPU, without any bitting of things from CPU memory.

Because that is how most 2D rendering works and how Chrome works (which this product uses). It is rendered with CPU based rasterization to tiles which are uploaded to the GPU and then composited by the GPU.Unless the you disable GPU compositing, then there is also a CPU based fallback.

Comment Re:Re-writing history are we? (Score 1) 385

Prior to massive regulations insurance was affordable.

Um, that's if they're willing to sell it to you. I could not get insurance for epilepsy pre-ACA because the medications I needed were expensive, and also because people always called 911 after every seizure which meant routine ER visits, about two per month. Since insurers wanted to keep their insurance "affordable" for healthy dickheads trying to decide if they even needed it, that meant telling me GFY- which they did because there were no "massive regulations" preventing them.

Comment Re:So backwards... (Score 3, Insightful) 189

Well, now you're making a very different argument than the original "companies should not profit from products that might kill people." But I'll bite anyway. There are plenty of products that, though used correctly, can under some circumstances cause injury or death.

A very obvious one is medication. There are many medications that can have serious side effects, including death, when taken exactly as prescribed. We continue to use them because the benefits outweigh the risks.

You mentioned chainsaws. It is true that the majority of chainsaw accidents happen because of operator error. However, that doesn't mean that all of them do. The only way to completely eliminate the possibility of harm is to not use a chainsaw. But again, we continue to use them because the benefits are big enough.

There does need to be a standard for how safe autonomous vehicles need to be before we allow them on the roads. But setting that standard at "they need to never cause a death" is not only unrealistic, it is totally inconsistent with how our society deals with other potentially dangerous products.

Comment Re:Not the same (Score 1) 92

This is no worse than back in the 1960s when Ma Bell used to have its people listen in on all phone calls and write down the topics discussed on decks of index cards for each phone account. They then sold stacks of these cards to outfits like Montgomery Ward and S&H Green Stamps, which helped them to mail out coupon offers tailored for customers' interests. They only sent copies to J. Edgar Hoover when he said there was a good reason.

The U.S. Post office enhanced their revenues with a similar program steaming envelopes (note that stamps only cost a couple of cents back then, so it sure was effective at holding down prices). It was a win-win for everybody; what's the big deal?

Comment Re:Beyond idiotic (Score 1) 244

Well, there's good reason to hope on the carbon emissions front.

The global trend toward replacing coal with natural gas will have a massive impact on human CO2 footprint. And this isn't the result of the strangling hand of regulation either: gas plants are simply more economically efficient and easy to run. It also coincidentally generates less than half the CO2 per kwH that coal does.

This trend alone makes hitting world CO2 goals a lot more feasible. A better electricity grid will allow more diverse energy sources as well. It's really quite feasible to increase electricity production while reducing CO2 emissions.

Slashdot Top Deals

Time to take stock. Go home with some office supplies.

Working...