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Comment Re:IAPs (Score 1) 137

I thought Apple was only renting space to developers [slashdot.org], and got a fixed percentage from them. Isn't setting/raising prices something developer's should decide to do? Or are things somehow different in the UK?

Basically, when you sell something in any of Apple's stores, you choose a price tier in your default currency, and prices in other currencies are based on that price combined with the current exchange rates. For example, if I create a book right now, and specify tier 10 everywhere, that's $9.99 in USD, or $13.99 in CAD. If the Canadian dollar increases relative to the dollar, in a year, tier 10 could be $9.99 in the U.S. and $12.99 in CAD. In theory, the amount paid will always be approximately equal to $9.99 in USD.

To add further complexity, Apple provides some alternate price tiers that let you charge lower prices in developing countries, and for books, even lets you set per-country price tiers, IIRC, which could distort pricing even further... but that's a side discussion. :-)

Comment Re:love the subtle anti-brexit push (Score 1) 137

A better measure is the Big Mac Index [wikipedia.org]. A McDonalds Big Mac contains more commodities, and a significant portion of the price is in the service sector. In the UK, the average price of a Big Mac is 2.99UKP. In America, it is $4.79. So the fair market conversion should be about 0.62. So the pound is currently undervalued against the dollar, and Apple is screwing the Brits.

That's silly. The Big Mac in the UK is likely made with British beef, British bread, British lettuce, British tomatoes, etc. Expecting the same exchange rate is completely unrealistic when you're talking about buying goods that are made outside the EU.

Mind you, I'm not saying the 1:1 conversion rate that Apple is using isn't Apple's way of giving the middle finger to the UK for Brexit, nor am I saying that I agree with it, but the rate ought to be set based on roughly the average conversion rate over the past few months or so, and that rate isn't anywhere near 0.62:1. Realistically, looking at recent trends, a 0.82:1 rate is probably pretty reasonable. Add to that Apple's usual safety margin, and I'd expect more like 0.85:1.

Comment Re: So Oracle discriminated (Score 1) 221

We have to vote for a person, not specific positions. While I generally agree with him on visa workers, there are many other things I don't. And he says really obnoxious things.

Also, it's not about "those leftists". Conservatives and GOP have been happy to give businesses what they want to make a profit, including exploitable and cheap visa workers, and in many cases "illegals".

Lefties have been somewhat more likely to complain about visa worker issues than righties over the years in my observation. Overall, Trump is a generally centrist, by the way.

Comment Re:Merit over Intersectionalist Bingo Quotas (Score 2, Interesting) 221

claptrap. You don't hire to fill quotas ... You hire the best candidate to do a job.

I've been in the work-world long enough to know that social factors play a large role in actual hiring decisions/preferences. Humans are social animals and tribal by nature/habit.

We like to THINK we are objective, but in practice we are not. We unconsciously prefer people who think like and have a background similar to ourselves. We don't want mental-world-view-mismatches that take us out of our comfort zone.

Once I inadvertently got the results of my own job interview due to a mix-up. The hiring manager stated, "Tablizer [alias] is technically competent and experienced, but has no personality. He is a stick-in-the-mud. We want somebody more interesting." [paraphrased]

Submission + - Meet Kubo, the robot that teaches kids to code (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: "Kubo comes with its own programming language called TagTile. The language consists of puzzle pieces that fit together to give Kubo instructions. For example, you could connect three pieces together – forward, turn, then another forward. Kubo then drives over these pieces oncer to “learn” the command, then can remember and perform it without needing the pieces.

Kubo reads the puzzle pieces using an RFID technology – each piece has an individual embedded RFID tag, and Kubo itself has a reader built in." — TechCrunch

Submission + - How the Human Brain Decides What Is Important and What's Not (neurosciencenews.com)

baalcat writes: A new study in Neuroscience News sheds light on how we learn to pay attention in order to make the most of our life experiences.

"The Wizard of Oz told Dorothy to “pay no attention to that man behind the curtain” in an effort to distract her, but a new Princeton University study sheds light on how people learn and make decisions in real-world situations.

The findings could eventually contribute to improved teaching and learning and the treatment of mental and addiction disorders in which people’s perspectives are dysfunctional or fractured."

Comment Re: Eight function toilet? (Score 1) 173

The nozzle is just under the seat, not in the lower part of the bowl. Most modern Japanese toilets have the nozzle on a retractable wand that is always out of the "drop zone" and emerges only when commanded to do so with the controls.

So no, you cannot pee or crap on them* and they keep pretty clean on their own. But there is also a button that will extend it for a wipe down.

*If you push the button while dropping a load, all bets are off. If you push it while peeing, it'll piss back at you, but the modern Toto units won't deploy if there's no one on the seat.

Submission + - Quimitchin: The First Mac Malware of 2017 Arrives

wiredmikey writes: Security researchers have a uncovered a Mac OS based espionage malware they have named "Quimitchin". The malware is what they consider to be "the first Mac malware of 2017" which appears to be a classic espionage tool. While it has some old code and appears to have existed undetected for some time, it works.

It was discovered when an IT admin noticed unusual traffic coming from a particular Mac, and has been seen infecting Macs at biomedical facilities.

Comment Re: Share and Enjoy! (Score 5, Informative) 173

It's not "enema"

It's Stop, Butt Rinse, Butt Rinse (gentle, for hemorrhoids), Feminine Wash, and Air Dry.

Opening the cover for those controls you usually only mess with once is just for comedic effect. But those controls are for moving the jet forward or backward to bullseye the target area, stream strength, pulsed or non-pulsing streams, temperature, and seat warming settings.

Yeah, we had one of these. Don't knock them till you try them, your sphincter will thank you later, especially when wiping is like trying to get peanut butter out of a shag carpet.

Submission + - Robotic Sleeve Mimics Muscles to Keep a Heart Beating

randomErr writes: 5.7 million adults in the United States have heart failure each year with about 41 million worldwide. Currently treatment involves surgically implanting a mechanical pump, called a ventricular assist device (VAD), into the heart.The VAD helps maintains the heart's function. But patients with VADs are at high risk for getting blood clots and having a stroke. Researchers at Harvard University and Boston Children's Hospital have created a soft robotic sleeve that doesn't have to be implanted. The robotic sleeve slips around the outside of the heart, squeezing it in sync with their natural rhythm..

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