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Comment Re:So make it equally first amendment to block the (Score 1) 147

Fuck that. Set up a robocaller to call a random number from a list of political parties and representatives that use robocallers to give them a message that they suck and their use of rocoballers means you wont use them.

It'll be a short list, so a good parallel caller with access to multiple lines should be able to keep most of the senate permanently engaged.

DOS the fuckers.

Comment Re:Funny humanity (Score 1) 35

The whole Dark Matter thing was based on the presumption that there is NO WAY that WE can't see it.

Not at all. The whole dark matter thing was based on the presumption that there is mass that we can't see and this matter that we can't see was called "dark matter".

Others may have read more into it, but the name itself betrays the real, original intent behind describing this matter that we can't see or identify.

Comment My current installed extensions list... (Score 1) 165

Last updated: Fri Jul 29 2016 23:15:03 GMT-0700 (Pacific Standard Time)
User Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 5.1; rv:43.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/43.0 SeaMonkey/2.40

Extensions (enabled: 6)
* ChatZilla 0.9.92 (http://chatzilla.hacksrus.com/) (disabled)
* ColorfulTabs 18.1 (http://www.binaryturf.com/free-software/colorfultabs-for-firefox/)
* DOM Inspector 2.0.16.1-signed (http://www.mozilla.org/projects/inspector/)
* IE View 1.5.6 (http://ieview.roub.net/)
* PrefBar 7.0.0.1-signed (http://prefbar.tuxfamily.org/)
* WOT 20151208 (http://www.mywot.com/)
* uBlock Origin 1.7.6 (https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock)

I wished there was an updated IE View that didn't have malwares. :(

Comment Re:For those who may have forgotten (Score 1) 57

That certain was an important decision, but the Bell System was still requiring customers to have expensive coupler equipment installed for many years afterwards (that article was from 1974). Those couplers involved transformers that would have made even 56k modems impractical, much less DSL.

For sure, where I lived, the Bell breakup was the dividing line, after which we were allowed to buy phones from someone other than the phone company. I still remember when we got our first non-Bell telephone, though I was a young kid at the time, and it was after Bell broke up. More amusingly, we weren't even in Bell territory; we were served by GTE. That's how wide-ranging the implications of the breakup were. It rocked the industry, and changed things pretty dramatically for the better.

Comment Re:Yes, deleted files are (sometimes) recoverable (Score 1) 59

For spinning rust that works just fine, most of the time. Flash is another story entirely. It's likely that your overwrites will get put into _other_ free cells, and the flash controller will mark the cells you're trying to overwrite as free, rather than overwriting them. Depending on your usage patterns, they might _never_ get overwritten. Aaaaaaand we're back to the problem we were trying to solve... just one layer lower. :(

There actually is a way, but it involves creating a file that's as big as the remaining space on the volume, to ensure that there are no flash pages that don't get rewritten. And even then, that doesn't quite guarantee that it will get overwritten because the flash page you're trying to overwrite could get spared and replaced with a free page. Obviously if you do that enough times, it will eventually get overwritten, but you'll also drastically shorten the life of the flash disk.

A better solution, of course, is to have a flash controller that supports TRIM properly and guarantees that overwritten pages get zeroed in a timely manner. If you have that, then overwriting the data once is sufficient, because the data will eventually get zeroed. And frankly, there's no good reason for a flash controller to not aggressively erase pages that are no longer tied to the filesystem (the old version of the data), because they are unlikely to ever be used again.

Comment Re:Not a SQLite problem (Score 1) 59

In SQLite, you can do "PRAGMA secure_delete=ON;" and it will subsequently overwrite all deleted information with zeros. This is turned off by default because it does more disk I/O. Alternatively, one can run "VACUUM" at any time to ensure that all deleted content has been purged from the database file.

The concern goes deeper than just disk I/O. On flash, there's a limited number of writes per flash erasure block, and using it in a mode that continuously overwrites everything you delete significantly increases the rate at which you burn through those write cycles. The OS is likely to coalesce a lot of those writes if they happen close enough together, but you're still abusing the hardware pretty badly by doing that.

The right approach is to come up with a reasonable policy for retention, e.g. "Guaranteed to not retain data more than n hours" and then vacuum the database every n hours, or when the OS tells you that your app is about to get terminated (assuming you can safely do it in such a short time), or when your app gets backgrounded (if you can't). Either way, vacuuming constantly is bad for the hardware, and never vacuuming is bad for security. The key is to find the right balance, and that pretty much requires your programmers to know that this issue exists, which most SQLite users no doubt do not.

And a couple of aspects of the design of iOS contribute to this problem negatively. If this were on a real computer:

  • You'd probably have a MySQL or PostgreSQL instance holding that data, and it would scrub periodically in the background. You can't do that you iOS, because you can't have a background daemon running when your app isn't running, so everybody ends up using SQLite, which is just barely enough of a database to be usable.
  • You wouldn't have the OS killing your app randomly while it is backgrounded, making it impractical to guarantee that you'll get n seconds to scrub every so many hours.

I'd love to see iOS add a centralized SQL database running on it at all times, with periodic scrubbing, with the ability to selectively share tables across apps, etc.

Comment For example (Score 1) 14

Blocklist: Trump, Hilary, Clinton, DNC, RNC, Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Green, gun control, s**t, f**k, h**l, ...

Actual posts filtered:

  • Google Trumps Apple as #1 on NASDAQ
  • California Drought Finally Over? Green Grass Says "Maybe"
  • Shitake Mushrooms Pulled Over E. Coli Concerns
  • Hello. My Name is...

Word bans don't work. They never did. To do this right would involve significant amounts of machine learning, and you wouldn't need a list of things to ban if they were doing that.

Comment Re:Yes, deleted files are (sometimes) recoverable (Score 2) 59

writing once is enough. It's an urban myth that you have to do it more than once to obliterate the data. Manybe with old 10megabyte RLL and MFM drives you could easily recover information as the head was miles wide and the slop from the track move was insane enough that you cna easily see it. bot for the past 10 years a single wipe of zeros will make it impossible for the worlds best hackers to read the data on a modern hard drive.

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