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Comment Re:Do Software Engineers Need to Register? (Score 1) 313

If you didn't graduate with a degree in software engineering then you are not really a software engineer.

Really? No. A degree in anything is a fucking degree, and isn't a prerequisite for professional status or taking on a given role.

Shit, you think chartered accountants all have degrees in accounting?

I'll measure someone's software engineering credentials by their knowledge, their practices and their ability to deliver working software, not by the fucking degree they managed to pass.

Comment Re:I hope he wins his suit (Score 2) 313

Technically, it is possible to get into med school with only three years of undergrad education, and a fraction of a percent of M.D. degrees are actually awarded to people under those circumstances, but realistically, you won't get into medical school to get an M.D. without first obtaining an undergraduate bachelor's degree. Similarly, you won't get into law school to get a J.D. degree without an undergrad degree.

You could certainly argue that they're equivalent to Master's degrees, but they most certainly are not undergraduate degrees.

Comment Re:Finding Patterns in Crime (Score 1) 55

there aren't obvious patterns in criminal activity. Sometimes they use code words, but the code words are different for every criminal.

I heavily used code-words at one place simply because the office politics were so intense that little things created drama storms.

Bob: "How's the hopper rider and the green peas?"

Me: "Oh, the Flanagan popped a rabbit, which agitated the mountaineer again."

Bob: "Yeah, their fiddle-sticks pack a punch. Good thing the Flux Whopper can plug the hole, otherwise Mr. Owl's tree branch would hang the cheese and us with it."

Me: "I know what you mean. Hammerheadding almost always beats painted planetariums."

Bob: "At least Spiderman didn't frisk the Joker's tentacle."

Me: "Indeed, I hate it when that happens. Take care, see ya tomorrow."

Bob: "Sure, don't let the plaid horse-bugs bite."

People thought we were on LSD, but at least we avoided trouble.

Submission + - US ISP Goes Down as Two Malware Families Go to War Over Its Modems (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two malware families battling for turf are most likely the cause of an outage suffered by Californian ISP Sierra Tel at the beginning of the month, on April 10. The attack, which the company claimed it was a "malicious hacking event," was the work of BrickerBot, an IoT malware family that bricks unsecured IoT and networking devices.

"BrickerBot was active on the Sierra Tel network at the time their customers reported issues," Janit0r told Bleeping Computer in an email, "but their modems had also just been mass-infected with malware, so it's possible some of the network problems were caused by this concomitant activity."

The crook, going by Janit0r, tried to pin some of the blame on Mirai, but all the clues point to BrickerBot, as Sierra Tel had to replace bricked modems altogether, or ask customers to bring in their modems at their offices to have it reset and reinstalled. Mirai brought down over 900,000 Deutsche Telekom modems last year, but that outage was fixed within hours with a firmware update. All the Sierra Tel modems bricked in this incident were Zyxel HN-51 models, and it took Sierra Tel almost two weeks to fix all bricked devices.

Submission + - Are accurate software development time predictions a myth? (medium.com)

DuroSoft writes: For myself and the vast majority of people I have talked to, this is the case. Any attempts we make to estimate the amount of time software development tasks will take inevitably end in folly. Do you find you can make accurate estimates, or is it really the case, as the author suggests, that "writing and maintaining code can be seen as a fundamentally chaotic activity, subject to sudden, unpredictable gotchas that take up an inordinate amount of time" and that therefore attempting to make predictions in the first place is itself a waste of our valuable time?

Submission + - Oregon fines man for writing a complaint email stating "I am an engineer..." (vice.com) 2

pogopop77 writes: In September 2014, Mats Järlström, an electronics engineer living in Beaverton, Oregon, sent an email to the state's engineering board. The email claimed that yellow traffic lights don't last long enough, which "puts the public at risk." "I would like to present these facts for your review and comments," he wrote. This email resulted not with a meeting, but with a threat from The Oregon State Board of Examiners for Engineering and Land Surveying stating "ORS 672.020(1) prohibits the practice of engineering in Oregon without registration — at a minimum, your use of the title 'electronics engineer' and the statement 'I'm an engineer' create violations." In January of this year, Järlström was officially fined $500 by the state for the crime of "practicing engineering without being registered."

Submission + - Murdered woman's Fitbit nails cheating husband

BarbaraHudson writes: A murdered woman's Fitbit data shows she was still alive an hour after her husband claims she was murdered and he was tied up, contradicting her husband's description of events.

Richard Dabate, 40, was charged this month with felony murder, tampering with physical evidence and making false statements following his wife Connie's December 2015 death at their home in Ellington, Tolland County.

Dabate called 911 reporting that his wife was the victim of a home invasion, alleging that she was shot dead by a "tall, obese man" with a deep voice like actor Vin Diesel's, sporting "camouflage and a mask," according to an arrest warrant.

Dabate alleged her death took place more than an hour before her Fitbit-tracked movements revealed.

Submission + - Why Did Google Really Block A Guerrilla Fighter In The Ad War? (fastcompany.com)

tedlistens writes: Google's decision to ban the Chrome plug-in AdNauseum due to a violation of its "single purpose policy"—shortly after the app began supporting the EFF's new Do Not Track standard—was only the latest salvo in an ongoing war over online advertising. The ad industry knows that ads are a nuisance, and it's now taking pre-emptive measures to make them more palatable—or, in Google's case, to block the unpalatable ones. But Google's positions also point to a crucial disagreement at the heart of the ad war: What makes ads such a nuisance to begin with?

Ads aren't just ugly, annoying, and bandwidth-sucking: They pose a risk to privacy, as the networks of software behind ads—cookies, trackers, and malware—watch not only where you go on the web but, through your phone and your purchases, what you do in real life. But privacy is largely missing from Google's discussion of problematic ads, says Howe. By avoiding mentioning AdNauseum's actual intent, Google's explanation for banning it echoes the advertising industry's discussion of web ads, which focuses on aesthetics rather than privacy.

Submission + - Gene silencing may treat two fatal neurological disorders

An anonymous reader writes: In studies of mice, scientists discovered a drug, designed to silence a gene called ataxin 2, may be effective at treating ALS and SCA2.NIH/NINDS
In two studies of mice, researchers showed that a drug, engineered to combat the gene that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), might also be used to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Both studies were published in the journal Nature with funding from National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Our results provide hope that we may one day be able to treat these devastating disorders,” said Stefan M. Pulst, M.D., Dr. Med., University of Utah, professor and chair of neurology and a senior author of one the studies. In 1996, Dr. Pulst and other researchers discovered that mutations in the ataxin 2 gene cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, a fatal inherited disorder that primarily damages a part of the brain called the cerebellum, causing patients to have problems with balance, coordination, walking and eye movements.
Read the full story here:
http://healthwithfitness.org/g...

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