Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment RTFA. They DID try it on people. (Score 1) 141

RTFA. Then follow the link to the paper. They DID try it on humans. Worked reasonably well (though the sample was small so it was more "does this maybe work on people, too? Is it worth a big study to check?" rather than "do all the results reproduce in people just like mice or are they quantitatively different in THIS way?").

Interestingly, they used a proprietary commercial boxed Fasting Mimicing Diet - L-Nutra's ProLon (Developed by a team including a USC Davis professor specializing in gerontology and life-extension) - on the human experimental subjects.

Comment Re:How about traveling without? (Score 1) 143

Your reply wandered so much that it's rather difficult to tell if you even had a plan for it. I'll take the most coherent parts of it and try to reply to them:

Yes, you can, especially if you're only vaguely on social networks. But we shouldn't have to jump through hoops like this

If you are so married to your online existence that you consider leaving your laptop behind to be "jumping through hoops" then you probably couldn't be helped by any amount of anything here. Fortunately for you people who are at that level of dependency seldom notice when they are more than 10 miles from their home - as they almost never look away from their screens anyways - so traveling doesn't really matter. As the majority of slashdot readers are far more than 10 miles from an international border, it is reasonable to expect that you wouldn't be a likely candidate to wander far.

when you're visiting friends and whatever while travelling, guess what, social networks are very useful in that case

First of all, if you are visiting other people, that should be your social network, right there. Why do you need to worry about other people at that time? You're taking your attention away from the people who actually cared enough about you to spend time with you in the real world.

Second, if you are visiting people who you interact with in your online social networks, you probably haven't gone some place where you need to worry about a travel mode for your devices; likely you haven't gone more than 10 miles from your home.

Do you think it stops at social networks? Should you leave your phone completely?

Do you really think the two are equivalent in levels of importance?

Social networks today, your phone call history tomorrow? Is that OK?

There are nations that for years have checked visitors' phones at customs. In case you didn't know this before, US laws don't travel with you when you enter another country - you enter another country and you are now expected to adhere to their laws. If you don't like their laws you should have traveled elsewhere.

You can do this at the moment. Then tomorrow when they start doing automatic searches based on your name, and show you an account they've found that looks like you and has your name, what then?

What are you talking about? This is quite a bit removed from the topic at hand. If you're worried that a foreign nation is going to ask you to log in to a social media account, then you've made yourself a slave to social media. I'm guessing you don't leave home often with that attitude, though so you're probably just fine with that.

Comment Re:Weak/nonexistent punishments for faulty notices (Score 1) 81

All patent applications are signed under penalty of perjury. However, the US Patent and Trademark office disbanded its enforcement department in 1974. So, you can perjure yourself on a patent application with impunity.

Unless it's testimony in a criminal case, or the perjury trap in front of a grand jury, or something they want to prosecute like lying on your tax form, the Federal government is in general lassiez faire about perjury, or even encouraging of it with their reluctance to prosecute, especially perjury committed by a so-called intellectual property holder.

Comment How about traveling without? (Score 3) 143

Really, traveling without social media is a very pleasant option in most cases. My most memorable vacations are the ones I took where I was not worried about WiFi or 3G service. Your vacation should get you away from what consumes you during the rest of your existence; if you are worrying about that crap while you are away I'm going to tell you that your doing your vacation wrong.

Comment G+, the only lower-volume network than slashdot (Score 1) 1

I'm quite active on G+. However I find the only way to get in a discussion with other people is to start in a discussion started by the account of someone who is vastly better known in public than myself. Even then, the discussions don't tend to last long. When I post things publicly in my own name I get a few comments from people I know and that's generally about it. In my circles is one person who works for Google, and when he posts he doesn't tend to get a ton of replies either.

I guess if I joined more groups on there, and then posted to them, I might see more volume. The problem with that though is then you are usually just posting to people who already agree with you, which isn't that terribly useful.

Comment Re:About (Score 1) 7

Probably about three or four hundred pages.

Well, according to the wikipedia page it was supposed to be 320 pages. I was just surprised that there was apparently a large amount of interest in a page when all that was known about it was the title, length, and author.

It is suggested on the wikipedia page about the author that the book may have been intended to be autobiographical. I guess that means it belongs in the fiction category then...

Comment Re:What it's about? Simple. (Score 1) 7

I don't have any reason to contest that, but do you have any sources to back it up? If that was the entire subject matter of it, then why would so many conservatives rush out to pre-order it? Even as much energy as the GOP has put in to attacking and suppressing anyone who is not straight, white, male, and Christian, this doesn't seem like a topic that a lot of their base would want to put energy into reading up on.

Or were they just buying it to put on their bookshelves next to the latest books from Coulter, Limbaugh, and the likes? Or were the pre-orders actually coming from PACs and other similar entities that were out to amplify the message for some reason?

Comment Re:Don't blame the publishers ... (Score 1) 8

Therein lies one of the biggest problems in the current situation - we are still in a job market that is toxic to the worker, and it is reinforced by a government that encourages bad behavior. Labor unions have - to be generous - only very marginal power in the US and we're going to see them lose most of what little power they still have soon. Blacklists are coming back in fashion in a big way - where is someone with a dishonorable discharge going to find employment when all their training came from the job that canned them for insubordination?

It doesn't much matter the consequences of following an order on a larger scale; right now the workers will follow damned near any order as long as it means the paycheck keeps coming in.

Slashdot Top Deals

RADIO SHACK LEVEL II BASIC READY >_

Working...